Where I can buy a big size Bicycle in Tokyo and what kind of bicycle I should buy.

Cactaur

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Disc brakes are nice but it doesn't automatically make rim brakes obsolete. There might be good deals to be found on the used or new old stock market.
 
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stu_kawagoe

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You can see a lot of second hand bikes on the Cycly and Buychari websites. They have a mark up as they are commercial sellers but you’ll get an a idea of what you can get for your money.
 

kiwisimon

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OP, make sure you buy the bike you think is best for your purpose and fit. Many people are trempted to buy a great deal but end up regretting not getting the bike they should have paid a little more for. What make or models have you decided on?
 

stu_kawagoe

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If you wanted a proper road bike because you like going fast, there’s always the Allez. I’m presuming you’re young and in pretty good shape so what you sacrifice in a bit of comfort on a short commute, you make up for with speed and handling. This would be a great bike for hammering up the Tamagawa on your way home from class. You can also upgrade the parts easily if you get more into tinkering with your bike. The Allez has a great pedigree and is way cooler than a more commuter friendly rig, too😎

I do like these hypothetical bike buying threads😆

 
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OreoCookie

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I do like these hypothetical bike buying threads😆
Yes, spending other people's money feels great. Your recommendation (with the caveats) of the Allez is great. Another one could be the CAADX or CAAD12/13 from Cannondale, which should be in plentiful supply.
 
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kiwisimon

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If you wanted a proper road bike because you like going fast, there’s always the Allez.

I do like these hypothetical bike buying threads😆
Allez a good choice if he is not in town traffic too much. Not so good for fenders or racks etc.


CAADX or CAAD12/13 from Cannondale, which should be in plentiful supply.
     budget and size constraints I'm not so sure.
 

microcord

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I don't understand the fuss about disc brakes on a bike primarily intended for commuting within Tokyo. Even single-pivot caliper rim brakes should be fine as long as they're set up right and the pads aren't ancient. But what you'd get would instead be dual-pivot calipers or V-brakes: even better. I'm 75 kg or so and have no problems with rim brakes in Tokyo. (Admittedly I don't ride either during heavy rain or through slush, but neither to most people.) My rim brakes don't require special care in transit, they don't squeal, and (not that I'm much interested) they weigh less than disc brakes.
 

OreoCookie

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I don't understand the fuss about disc brakes on a bike primarily intended for commuting within Tokyo. Even single-pivot caliper rim brakes should be fine as long as they're set up right and the pads aren't ancient. But what you'd get would instead be dual-pivot calipers or V-brakes: even better. I'm 75 kg or so and have no problems with rim brakes in Tokyo. (Admittedly I don't ride either during heavy rain or through slush, but neither to most people.) My rim brakes don't require special care in transit, they don't squeal, and (not that I'm much interested) they weigh less than disc brakes.
If you have N bikes with N > 1, you may be right. But most normal people (think of the opposite of @bloaker) only have a single bike to do it all.
 
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microcord

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If you have N bikes with N > 1, you may be right. But most normal people (think of the opposite of @bloaker) only have a single bike to do it all.
Yes, I ride any of three bikes. [Hangs head in shame.] They all have rim brakes. The one I've used for most adventures has rim brakes that are about thirty years old (and weren't expensive even when new); I can hardly tell the difference in stopping power between them and the 105 rim brakes on the bike I've used in the last couple of weeks. (I greatly prefer the feel of the old ones; but that's because I find their cheapo Dixna levers far more comfortable than Tiagra brifters.) I had no worries about descending from Kazahari in the drizzle five days ago. (I was worried about the many wet manhole covers, but their slipperiness is independent of braking systems.) Coming down from Umenoki yesterday, my hands did get tired and they'd have been a lot less tired if I'd instead had hydraulic disc brakes.

It's true that I don't do it all. While I routinely ride along decaying, rock-strewn rindō, I never ride "offroad". If I did, I'd want hydraulic disc brakes. I'm sure that some people who do often ride offroad routinely use the same bikes for commuting. But I don't think that there are many of these people.

The dazed bike buyer is persuaded that disc brakes are a must. If this depresses the demand for and price of bikes with rim brakes, good. (As for the notion that rim brakes will soon be obsolete and parts unobtainable. I don't buy it. Not when I consider that you can still buy 126 mm rear hubs, "27-inch" [=630] tyres, etc etc.)
 

stu_kawagoe

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For 160,000 you get a Domane with the relatively new Tiagra hydraulic disc brakes and group set. A fair bit over the OP’s budget but a step up in quality. If I was looking for my first “proper bike” again, I’d consider this.


 

OreoCookie

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Yes, I ride any of three bikes. [Hangs head in shame.]
No need to be ashamed. I'd have three if my wife didn't forbid me from having more than two :p
Coming down from Umenoki yesterday, my hands did get tired and they'd have been a lot less tired if I'd instead had hydraulic disc brakes.
That and much better modulation (in part due to feedback) is the difference, not stopping power. On a road bike stopping power is limited by your tires and hands, but not your brake power.
The dazed bike buyer is persuaded that disc brakes are a must. If this depresses the demand for and price of bikes with rim brakes, good. (As for the notion that rim brakes will soon be obsolete and parts unobtainable. I don't buy it. Not when I consider that you can still buy 126 mm rear hubs, "27-inch" [=630] tyres, etc etc.)
I'm coming from the world of mountain biking and I bought my first disc brake bike over 15 years ago (either 2004 or 2005, not sure). No way I am going back to rim brakes, even for commuting, but that's just me.

Even for commuters and entry-level riders, hydraulic (rim or disc) brakes offer advantages as they need much less actuation force. My mom has hydraulic rim brakes on her bike and she loves them. (Although I doubt she knows they are hydraulic.) I don't think they have been bled once in 10, 12 years, I think. Hydraulic brakes have come a long way and are dead easy to maintain. I wish my wife's bike had hydraulic brakes (even hydraulic rim brakes), because they are just a lot easier for a beginner as you need less force. Unfortunately, she has these stupid integrated shifters, for otherwise I would have ordered a set of Magura HS-11s for her.
They all have rim brakes. […] (I greatly prefer the feel of the old ones; but that's because I find their cheapo Dixna levers far more comfortable than Tiagra brifters.)
Given my background, I have to say the brake feel of all rim brake bikes I have tried recently was a reminder to me how far we have come (which is, admittedly, only two in the last two years, SRAM Force and Shimano Ultegra). Stopping power was alright, but it was just 0 or 1 and I had zero feedback from the brake (because cables can only be pulled and not pushed, unlike hydraulic fluid).
 
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AlexF

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Jul 21, 2020
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I don't understand the fuss about disc brakes on a bike primarily intended for commuting within Tokyo.
Having lived here for just a short time, I'm already finding the weather here (esp during rainy season) to be quite unpredictable. This, if anything, makes disk brakes even more valuable - as a safety feature - on a commuter. The last thing you want, especially when in traffic, is to have your brakes behave differently from one minute to the next because your rims are slightly damp due to a few errant drops of water.

Sure, disk brakes may weigh a bit (or even a lot) more, and may take a bit of (different) fiddling to set up, but those are the only downsides. Whether mechanical, hydraulic, or hybrid, they all offer predictable, consistent response. The extra stopping power, lower activation strength needed, and modulation are of course nice bonuses.
 
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microcord

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I think that every friend of mine who rides a bike with disc brakes got the bike with the brakes set up properly but thereafter at least once had problems, more or less serious, with one or occasionally both of the brakes: unwanted friction, mysterious non-braking, sudden brake pad wear, or of course plain old squeaking. Perhaps these people are atypical. (Or indeed perhaps they/we are all paid stooges for the rim brake industrial complex: Yoshigai, most likely.)

Mastering the art of unpredictable rim brake response: (i) pull on brake levers with moderate force. If the response is insufficient: (ii) pull harder.

But shtum: Don't tell everyone! I'm delighted to read yet more criticism of rim brakes. As riding a bike with rim brakes (even for commuting) comes to be regarded as reckless, even mad, I can expect the prices of good old suicidal old bikes equipped with rim brakes to keep falling.
 

OreoCookie

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But shtum: Don't tell everyone! I'm delighted to read yet more criticism of rim brakes. As riding a bike with rim brakes (even for commuting) comes to be regarded as reckless, even mad, I can expect the prices of good old suicidal old bikes equipped with rim brakes to keep falling.
And a few years earlier we had friction shifters, which worked just fine. They also allowed us to shift, no? You didn’t even have to twiddle with the cable tension to make sure shifts happen properly. Maintenance was so much easier back then. Once you learnt how to shift properly, you could do it in your sleep. Who needs these STI levers anyway? The shift mechanism in STI levers literally got rusty from all the sweat and I couldn’t shift any longer — that wouldn’t have happened with friction shifters. ;)
 

microcord

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And a few years earlier we had friction shifters, which worked just fine.
Well said! One of my bikes still has the friction shifters that I suppose came with it when it was new, back in 1982. You're right: when I ride it, I don't miss STI. (I do however miss 21st-century chainwheel sizing.)

Another bike has STI shifters on the downtube. LBS man's list of suggested fittings for building up the frame included Dura-Ace shifters. That was a big shock. I was much relieved when he quickly added that they were somehow immune from the "luxury goods" pricing normally applied to Dura-Ace. Anyway, perhaps just because they have the "mystique" of the Dura-Ace brand, they haven't noticeably corroded.