What's in your bag? - 2012 edition

Apr 3, 2012
401
98
48
Tama Center <-> Otemachi
#1
I'm curious what people carry when cycling in different situations. Commuting, touring, and touring in remote areas. Both bicycle and people repair kits to non-bicycle items.

My real motivation is to find what to bring when taking day trips to remote areas.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#2
Heroin. <just kidding> --- but:

1) GEAX or Cafe Latex Sealant
2) Tissues
3) Few band aids and larger wound patch
4) 10-15 200mg Ibuprofen
5) Mini-tool
6) Valve Extender
7) 1000 yen Note
8) Valve core removal tool and small length of silicone tube (for the sealant)
9) Spare KCNC 'magic link' for my chain.
10) Universal dropout hanger
11) Couple of plastic tie-wraps
 
Apr 3, 2012
401
98
48
Tama Center <-> Otemachi
#3
I have a Topeak rack and bag with panniers. Ugly but I have a lot room for gear. No backpack. Recently I got a top tube bag.

Always with me:
Self adhesive patch kit.
Spare tube x 1
Spare tire x 1
Tire levers
Mini pump
latex gloves
Forward lamp (From Chitan (johnikedawilliams) and blinkers for the rear.

Commute:
Torx Security bits (to phreak the bicycle lock up, if something goes wrong like a power failure)
$dayjob clothing + shoes
body wipes
extra shirt for the ride home
500ml bottle

Touring:
500ml bottle x 2 (Never more then an hour away from a vending machine it seems)
Food for the entire trip + legal stimulants. :confused:
Cache battery to power the iPhone
iPhone case attachment for the handle bar.
Rinko bag

Missing is a first aid kit and tools to deal with emergency repairs.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,445
922
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#4
Always:
- puncture kit
- single spare tube
- tyre levers
- pump (Mini Morph)
- tyre boot (2 x 4 cm inner tube piece)
- 1000 yen note
- multi tool (Crank Brothers m10)
- about 1/2 dozen zip ties
- plastic bag to cover Brooks saddle against rain
- wallet with ID, insurance card, cash, plastic
- Android phone
- bike lock

Unless there is 0% chance of rain:
- removable mud guards

Any non-local trip:
- two 0.5l water bottles
- 8,000 mAh USB battery for the Android phone
- digital camera (Canon S95)
- two spare Li-polymer batteries for camera
- small bottle of sunscreen

This is probably more than most people carry. On the other hand I don't carry any medical kit, no second tube, no spare tyre.
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
2,519
650
133
Kanazawa
#6
I've been having trouble finding a source, but I'd like to have at least one of those Doraemon doko-de-mo holes in my bag all the time.
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#7
I am thinking about taking a more holistic approach to all this, and just taking Joe Wein with me.

:D

Thanks for lending me your tools when we did Tomin No Mori mate!
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#8
Hmm, just going over this thread as I'm packing now for the Haute Route. The organizers will transport a backpack on each stage. There is no neutral support except for serious mechanicals - whcih means every rider for him/herself, basically. I want my 'on bike' stuff as minimal as possible - any pockets will be used primarily for food stashing on the descents and flats.... So - here's what I'm thinking:

My 'usual' list as above. Plus

1 CO2 Canister
1 Spare tire (pre taped)
100y store rainjacket that I cut down
Carmex
Small tube of sunblock

For the 'Daily Bag'

4 jerseys (2 HR, 1 HFC and 1 Hapi-GO!)
2 bibsets (1 HR and 1 Lightweight)
4 base layer shirts - 2 long and 2 short sleeve
4 sets of socks
1 compression socks
2 set arm covers (NRit and Outwet)
1 set leg warmer / cooler (Outwet)
1 membrane Jacket
1 Longsleeve Jersey
1 Jinbei
1 Day Clothes (light cotton trouser, shirt,combo)
2 Bandanas
2 Towels
Bikes Spares (spokes, cable, chain link, bar tape, cassette lower gears)
Netbook PC
Cache Battery / Charger - Thanks, Joe!!
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#9
Tim, I've tried the pre tapping of tires and honestly its a PITRA! It's best just to cut enough tape to do one wheel and then store seperately. Much easier to apply and doesn't get soiled when being carried.

In my always pouch:

1 - emergency blanket
1 - First Aid kit
1 - Mini Pump
2 - Co2 canisters and a valve head
1 - Puncture repair kit containing numerous patches, sandpaper, chalk, valves and extenders, Tyre boots
2 - Alu tyre levers
2 - spare inner tubes 60mm valve length
1 - multi tool with chainbreaker
2 - zip ties

Commute:

Used to leave everything at work and then just then just get it all dry cleaned locally.

5 days worth of shirts, 2 x suits, selection of ties, 2x shoes
Lock left at my usual parking space.

Touring:

If you can't fit everything in to 3 pockets and a saddle bag then you're doing it wrong :D

But can't stand back packs so any multiday riding I've always just sent a bag to each location then Tukubin it home next morning. Every place I've stayed at has been able to supply towels and toiletries.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#10
The organizer will send our stage bags ahead each day - so that helps. I just need to cover the on-the road essentials including food - which is kind of a hassle. Yeah - I've got a couple of 'pull offs' that are already taped - they are great for spares as long you keep them in a ziplock bag. I'm also bringing a roll of tape just in case. I don't expect many flats - but I'm paranoid especially when there is no neutral support for it.

Have to get CO2 bombes at location cause can't fly with them! (thanks for the heads up).
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#11
OH and don't for get to run with a slight lower Psi for the big mountain stages! Very easy to forget on the day and suffer a blow out. If you are running tires that can take a Psi up to 200 then you don't need to worry (Vittoria are rated to this) however you might want to check the psi limit of the rims as I've known people to kill wheels this way.

Also one of the biggest issues friends who have ridden this event tell me is rims overheating and warping due to the constant breaking - the roads down can get pretty choked and you can be constantly on the brakes - many riders opted for Alu breaking surfaces for this reason. Also take spare brake pads for same reason!
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#13
Good points!

1) I've got several different compound pads - including some of the new kwikstops design for hi-temp carbons.

2) I'm now hardgluing AND taping the tires due to seeing some bleeding of the Miyata tape on a couple hard descent tests recently. No issues at all with the fronts (thankfully) only the back.

3) I'm riding tubulars which are inherently less vunerable to pressure issues - and I run quite low anyway (85-95psi) as I'm not heavy and prefer a slightly more supple ride - especially on the faster pavement.

4) Also due to my lower weight I really have to tuck in to get anything faster than 70-80kph. The 70kg+ riders can easily get into the 100kph range and the braking force required to haul them back down is tremendous.

Right now I'm banking on the fact that -

1) Very few of the descents are much more than 6%-9% - especially for any length of time. In fact most are in the 4-8% range.

2) I will be taking it very conservative on the descents - mostly upright and so my natural wind-braking will keep me in a good safety zone. "Arrive Alive" is my motto. I can make hay on the ascents.

3) The ambient temp is cooler than Japan (right now) and with much less humidity - so everything (including the body) runs a little cooler - especially at the higher elevations.

Yeah - forgot about the holiday season - the roads will be jammed - especially gettting off the summits could be a real hassle.

Well, this will certainly be an experience - and I'll feedback exactly what I used or not used. I'm going pretty much on the last couple 'long rides' we7ve done, plus 'alpha' for the paranoia component.

OH and don't for get to run with a slight lower Psi for the big mountain stages! Very easy to forget on the day and suffer a blow out. If you are running tires that can take a Psi up to 200 then you don't need to worry (Vittoria are rated to this) however you might want to check the psi limit of the rims as I've known people to kill wheels this way.

Also one of the biggest issues friends who have ridden this event tell me is rims overheating and warping due to the constant breaking - the roads down can get pretty choked and you can be constantly on the brakes - many riders opted for Alu breaking surfaces for this reason. Also take spare brake pads for same reason!
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,445
922
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#15
OH and don't for get to run with a slight lower Psi for the big mountain stages! Very easy to forget on the day and suffer a blow out. If you are running tires that can take a Psi up to 200 then you don't need to worry (Vittoria are rated to this) however you might want to check the psi limit of the rims as I've known people to kill wheels this way.
Air pressure drop at altitude really shouldn't be much of an issue. I think that's a bit of a myth, same for loading bikes on planes without deflating tyres. The highest col on the HR is the Cime de la Bonette at 2802 m, just a little higher than Mt Norikura. Lots of people have gone to Norikura from sea level without bursting their tyres.

Air pressure at the top is some 26 kPa (about 4 psi) lower than at sea level, but assuming you pump every day and not just back in Tokyo at sea level, what matters more is the pressure differential for the maximum daily climb, which is less than 1600 m, for a 15 kPa / 2 psi difference, not a huge amount even for clincher tyres rated at 1050 kPa / 150 psi.

The other factor you mention is far more relevant: heat. Braking in the mountains can heat up the air in the tyres and that leads to much more of a pressure differential increase than the outside air pressure decrease. For example, heating air from 20 C to 70 C increases its pressure by about 1/6, 25 psi in a fully inflated 150 psi tyre.
 

AlanW

Maximum Pace
Jan 30, 2007
1,214
436
103
Tokyo
#16
The problem is not low pressure in planes or at the top of cols (even going from sea level to a full vacuum, you're only increasing the gauge pressure by 1 bar), but pressure due to heat from braking.
Clincher tyres can blow off the rim if their max pressure is exceeded. As Tim said, tubulars are unlikely to do this but can melt their glue and roll off or slip radially on the rim, damaging the valve. I've seen both happening as people ride down from the top of hillclimb races. In this situation, usually the speed is controlled by a lead car, and held down a lot slower than normal decending. People drag their brakes constantly and the brakes are doing nearly all the work, instead of air drag. All the energy dissipated as heat which has to go somewhere - and it goes into the wheels, and then the tyres and tubes.
But riding as Tim describes, he'll be fine :)
 
Jun 9, 2011
241
1
36
tokyo
#17
back to the original topic:

always:
1x spare tube
2x tire levers
2x spare axle bolts (for yobi hubs. i've broken one before)
1x 6mm hex key
1x 5mm hex key
1x 4mm hex key
1x 2mm hex key (maybe 2.5? for brake pads)
1x 10cm hand pump (to get the tube started)
2x CO2 canisters (to finished the tube off)
1x CO2 valve head
1x removable core valve extender
1x valve extender for non-removable cores
1x valve core removal tool
1x long velcro tape (spare and also holds hex keys and extenders)

and rear axle tools depending on the bike i'm riding
1x small 15mm wrench
or
1x pedro's tool (for couplers)
1x torx (for rear axle bolts on yobi hub)

i pack this in a small bag which either goes in a bottle cage tool holder or a jersey pocket depending on how many water bottles i'm carrying.

longer rides:
Mont-bell compact rinko bag (smallest i could find. still too big for my frame)
lezyne smart wallet (craptacular. looking for a better phone/ID/cash option)
ride food (figs, dates, black sugar, umeboshi in hot weather)
first aid kit with
- 1x scissors
- 1x bandage tape
- 3x medium size bandages (for abrasions or big cuts)
- 2x bandaging netting (more comfortable than tape)
- 3x-5x band-aids
- 1x small liquid antiseptic bottle
- maybe some other first aid stuff? don't remember

I keep the rinko bag and first aid kid under my saddle. everything else goes in jersey pockets. Many of the folks i've ridden with don't carry ride food and seem to do fine with picking things up at convenience stores along the way. I carry food because I've run out of gas on long climbs before so i like to eat a little about 15 minutes before starting a long climb. I also like to avoid convenience store food during physical activity because it's full of crap things.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,445
922
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#18
I also like to avoid convenience store food during physical activity because it's full of crap things.
Maybe I'm a bit naive, but I tend to think of conbini food as upmarket supermarket food. Mostly they sell more a expensive but better quality segment of what's available in supermarkets.

They have a very short shelf cycle compared to large stores. Things like sandwiches or onigiri either sell the same day or get thrown out.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#19
Have to agree with Joe the rice balls and sandwiches are one day only items.

I live off Tunamayo and Egg sandwwiches when out on a ride and they are packed with everything you need to keep energy levels up.