What does "DH" bar stand for?

baribari

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May 28, 2010
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#1
I get that "DH bar" is the term people use in Japan for TT/triathalon bars, but what does it stand for?

Or does it come from the old Scott DH bars? In that case, what did DH stand for?
 

baribari

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#6
They do refer to drop handles as "doroppo handoru" but they don't ever say "DH." DH bar in this case refers specifically to tri-bars. Which do not have "drops" per say.
 

kiwisimon

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#7
Nah. That would make sense, which is probably why it's incorrect.
Oh bugger it's time for a real history lesson from "grandma", ok a long time ago there was a ski equipment designer who branched out into cycling handle bars, his name Ed Scott, the company got it's name from him. . When Lemond beat Hinault in 1989 he was using them. Prior to that breakout moment his bars had been used by multiple Ironman and triathlon champions for a number of years and he called those tri-bars the DH bar. It kinda became generic here in Japan for all tri-bars regardless of manufacturer. They were very popular with flat track heroes when they had following winds. Here is what they looked like, That's a Kestrel frame they are on. Probably one of the first monocoque frames to be mass produced.
 
Likes: wexford
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#9
"DownHill"

Not because they're used for riding downhill, but because you're so 'æro' that you feel like you're going downhill. Apparently.
To support my case - with the best of intentions, with all due respect for my learned friend, and in full recognition of the inherent limitations of my own internet research (relevant XKCD) - I offer a citation (in Japanese, which is what the OQ was about).

In fact I'll revise my explanation:

Not because they're used for riding downhill, but because you're so 'æro' that you look like you're skiing downhill.
 
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dastott

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May 10, 2012
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#11
Oh bugger it's time for a real history lesson from "grandma", ok a long time ago there was a ski equipment designer who branched out into cycling handle bars, his name Ed Scott, the company got it's name from him. . When Lemond beat Hinault in 1989 he was using them.
Sorry to be pedantic but Hinault retired in 1986. It was Fignon that Lemond beat in 2 TTs in the 1989 Tour de France to popularise these bars, stage 5 and most famously the final stage into Paris. They were actually first used in pro cycling by the 7 Eleven team in the 1989 Tour de Trump (!) prior to the TdF. More info here: https://www.bikeradar.com/blog/article/part-2-the-greatest-tour-of-all-by-greg-lemond-22650/

The picture shown above is similar to the large 1 piece bar Lemond used in the 1990 Tour.
 
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kiwisimon

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#15
That's really interesting. Thank you. So 'DH' stands for... "Defeated Hinault"?
in my alternative history yes.
Not because they're used for riding downhill, but because you're so 'æro' that you look like you're skiing downhill.
Which brings us back to Mr Ed Scott a ski gear manufacturer, I wonder where he got the inspiration to call them DH.