Wet weather gear recommendations.

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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#1
What does everyone use to keep dry especially trousers? Any recommendations for cycling specific wear? I have tried cheapie waterproofs but the cut around the knees isn't roomy enough for pedalling. Thanks.. I have been looking at Wiggle and also O2. Gore is maybe another option. Is anyone riding with Pearlizumi wet weather gear?
 
Jan 14, 2007
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Noda
japanichiban.com
#2
What does everyone use to keep dry especially trousers? Any recommendations for cycling specific wear? I have tried cheapie waterproofs but the cut around the knees isn't roomy enough for pedalling. Thanks.. I have been looking at Wiggle and also O2. Gore is maybe another option. Is anyone riding with Pearlizumi wet weather gear?
1) Wear less and keep dry clothes in my small back pack. (get wet. It doesn't hurt).

2) Carry some tightly packed rain pants and jacket. (hate having to re-pack them after drying them out).

I find that trying to keep my clothes dry with rain wear and pants just makes me sweat more than the rainfall.
Easier to just get wet.
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#3
I have a set of DHB rain trousers, they are great! I also have a "Night Vision " rain jacket, also great, the night vision rain gloves worked for about 6 months, now they are rain sponges :rolleyes: The GoreBike overshoes also work great!
 

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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#5
sorry i should have said this is for cycling between appointments. I have about 30 minutes riding between jobs and I am looking for something I can peel off and on. Have fenders and the rain falling from the sky still gets my trousers wet.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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#6
My 'wet-commute' system is thus;

-Full racing gear; tights / shorts and jersey depending on temperature.
-I am a speccy-****, so my glasses stop the rain hitting my eyes (unless it is hammering it!)
-Work clothes, ironed, folded and put into a polythene bag, inside my rucksack.
-Wallet in a zip bag inside my rucksack.
-Phone wrapped in Cling-Film (that is Saranwrap to my trans-atlantic cousins)

Done
 
Mar 20, 2012
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Tokyo
#7
My own solution thus far has been to simply not cycle in the rain, if I can avoid it. It has less to do with a dislike of getting wet (on the contrary, the rain induces fond memories of old Blighty), and more to do with being nervous about tackling bendy corners and hills (and sometimes a combination of the two) on slick road bike tyres.
Problem is, given the crappy weather we've had recently I eliminate a significant proportion of my cycling days this way, which leaves me a grumpy train commuter. Am I being excessively nervous and lacking in confidence I wonder? I don't wish to hijack the thread, but does anyone actually do that whole summer bike/winter bike thing?

As for actual decent rain gear for cycling, I have not much experience myself, but I do remember reading the blog of a serious cyclist a while back who absolutely swore by a cycling-specific poncho. Epically uncool look I have no doubt, but it sounds like it could be a practical option for fairly short rides if you have no time to change. Quite how dry they keep your legs though, I have no idea. Personally I have a (much better looking) Rapha rain jacket (courtesy of their women's half price sale a while back), but due to fear of riding in the rain it has yet to experience anything much more substantial than a brief shower so not sure I can really make fair comment on effectiveness.
 

joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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#8
I use rain gear (trousers and hooded jacket) from a home centre for 3480 yen. Works very well for me. I wear it either on top of my regular clothes or on top of underwear, depending on temperatures and weather outlook. I originally bought this for a hiking trip on Yakushima Island, but also used for climbing Mt Fuji in rain and for many winter bike rides.

I've been doing all my shopping in rainy weather in the past weeks in this. My son uses the same gear for commuting by road bike from Setagaya-ku to Bunkyo-ku (19 km one way) every day, hasn't missed a day of cycling since the start of the month :)

It comes with a nylon bag and folds to about the same size as my compact folding bike rinko.
 

zenbiker

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Mar 4, 2008
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#9
For commuting, I find my Subaru Forester keeps me dry in even the most dreadful storms. Other than that, everything I've tried has let in the rain or soaked me in sweat.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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#10
My own solution thus far has been to simply not cycle in the rain, if I can avoid it. It has less to do with a dislike of getting wet (on the contrary, the rain induces fond memories of old Blighty), and more to do with being nervous about tackling bendy corners and hills (and sometimes a combination of the two) on slick road bike tyres.
Yeah, you get into it. Have you properly decked it yet? I am guessing no. Same with MTB tyres, you just need to get used to them. They are designed really ++++ing well, and can handle it. Just a case of testing your limits, I guess. Maybe go out and do a load of cornering by yourself. You can really go mad on this modern stuff.

Problem is, given the crappy weather we've had recently I eliminate a significant proportion of my cycling days this way, which leaves me a grumpy train commuter. Am I being excessively nervous and lacking in confidence I wonder? I don't wish to hijack the thread, but does anyone actually do that whole summer bike/winter bike thing?
- F+CK trains. Full of UTTER scum.
- You are lacking in confidence, that is all. Get out on some rides. Will fix you up completely.
- Summer/Winter thing; what do you mean?
 

m o b

Speeding Up
Jun 22, 2008
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Bremen
cyclitis.wordpress.com
#11
For commuting to work I use DHB rain trousers as well as they are not as expensive as brand stuff and OK. Very wide, cheap rain jacket for sailing with hoodie. Waterproof overshoes and waterproof gloves (Gore).

The most important improvements I made are:

(1) Wearing a cycling cap below the hood to keep the rain water away from the glasses.

(2) Using detachable mud guards of good quality at the rear and at the front. That made a huge difference how fast feets are getting wet.

http://www.sks-germany.com/?l=en&a=product&r=mudguards&i=5288300000&RACEBLADE SET
 
Mar 20, 2012
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Tokyo
#12
Yeah, you get into it. Have you properly decked it yet? I am guessing no. Same with MTB tyres, you just need to get used to them. They are designed really ++++ing well, and can handle it. Just a case of testing your limits, I guess. Maybe go out and do a load of cornering by yourself. You can really go mad on this modern stuff.



- F+CK trains. Full of UTTER scum.
- You are lacking in confidence, that is all. Get out on some rides. Will fix you up completely.
- Summer/Winter thing; what do you mean?
No decking experience thus far! Again the concrete isn't my primary concern, but rather cars - my commute right now is 15km along mostly main roads with 50km/h speed limit, and I worry that if I did slip taking a corner then me and my bike might get squashed by a truck! (I also now commute Setagaya-ku to Bunkyo-ku, perhaps I take a similar route to joewein's son?)
Guess I need to try taking it slow on a wet day to just see how the bike handles.

Agree on the train front, on my grumpy commute yesterday I saw a guy who appeared to be covertly filming some women with his mobile on the Marunouchi line and I remembered one of the reasons I hate the trains :mad:
(though actually this was the first time I have ever witnessed anything like that!)

And as for summer/winter thing, I read something somewhere else on the Tinterweb about having one bike for riding in the summer and another more weather-hardy bike for riding in the winter. If you're not familiar though, I guess that would be a no for separate bikes? :warau:
 

kiwisimon

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#13

Sikochi

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#16
sorry i should have said this is for cycling between appointments. I have about 30 minutes riding between jobs and I am looking for something I can peel off and on. Have fenders and the rain falling from the sky still gets my trousers wet.
When I had no option and had to commute in all weathers, I borrowed someone else`s suggestion from a while back and just used a pair of swim shorts. You can peel them off when you get where you are going (or keep them on underneath if not too wet), dry your legs with a towel, if needed, and just put your trousers on. For waterproof stuff, you can also check out the Sealskinz range. I have some of their socks and gloves.
http://www.sealskinz.com/

And as for summer/winter thing, I read something somewhere else on the Tinterweb about having one bike for riding in the summer and another more weather-hardy bike for riding in the winter. If you're not familiar though, I guess that would be a no for separate bikes? :warau:
In general, if it is raining (like last night), I just switch and ride the mama chariot - full mudguards.
 
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#17
Bumping the wet weather thread early this year. (If it's not obvious why, look out the window.)

My beloved REI waterproof pants aren't, any more. REI don't do their own brand these days. They are beyond salvage with Scotchguard, I fear. Two years ago I bought a pair of DHB things from Wiggle. While waterproof, they are horrible to use because they don't have a drawstring and slide down all the time. These have been excellent excuses for not riding in the rain.

So I've just splurged on a pair of Gore Bike Wear "Path" Waterproof Cycling Trousers. The reviews read well. Will let you know how I get on.
 
Jun 9, 2011
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tokyo
#18
i'm on my bike every commuting day. in cooler weather i use a non-ventilated helmet (bern baker), Altura Night Vision Overtrousers, a gore-tex proshell jacket (no insulation), waterproof (not really) shoe covers, and waterproof gloves or no gloves depending on the temperature. this keeps me completely dry except for my face and the bottoms of my shoes. in the summer i'm usually drenched whether it's raining or not so i wear as little possible and bring a change of clothes and use towels to dry off.

my winter gear would probably be fine for multiple trips as long as wet shoes/socks weren't an issue. multiple trips in the summer would be a little tougher but still do-able as long as you're not having to put your wet and dry clothes in the same bag.