Washing bibs in cold water

baribari

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It just occurred to me that Japanese washing machines only use cold water, which might prevent cycling clothing from getting sufficiently sanitized, hence my saddle sore issue.
Does anyone use any special precautions (e.g., a special sports wear detergent) to clean their bibs?

Or should I just give up and hand wash with 30 degree water like the instructions say?

Presumably Japanese detergent is formulated for low temperatures, but it's never going to be as effective as using warm water.
 

wexford

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I have a tough bottom. I even climbed mount fuji once with my bibs inside out and only noticed when I got back to the car. haha. They were still comfy.

I wash my bibs every ride. I usually use a hand wash detergent for all my cycling gear. I have never had any trouble though. I guess one thing is to ensure that they are rinsed well as maybe the detergent is what's causing you the issue? I usually use a laundry bag too.
 

OreoCookie

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I was my gear after every ride. I use either “sports detergent” or an antibacterial detergent, and put each item of clothing in a separate laundry bag (aka netto). This prevents smells that are really hard to avoid with time, because of the bacteria that break down byproducts of sweat.
 

baribari

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I have a tough bottom. I even climbed mount fuji once with my bibs inside out and only noticed when I got back to the car. haha. They were still comfy.

I wash my bibs every ride. I usually use a hand wash detergent for all my cycling gear. I have never had any trouble though. I guess one thing is to ensure that they are rinsed well as maybe the detergent is what's causing you the issue? I usually use a laundry bag too.
As do I. I could swear I had less sores when I was hand-washing (or even just soaking them in very diluted bleach solution), though.

I was my gear after every ride. I use either “sports detergent” or an antibacterial detergent, and put each item of clothing in a separate laundry bag (aka netto). This prevents smells that are really hard to avoid with time, because of the bacteria that break down byproducts of sweat.
I might get some sports detergent. I already do put my cycling stuff in lingerie bags and use antibacterial detergent. Maybe I should stop washing it together with my other clothes to prevent cross-contamination. Also I think I need to clean my washing machine.
 
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kiwisimon

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Best prevention is just washing (cold water is fine) not too much soap or scented detergents (as those are irritants) and leaving to dry well. Baking soda and vinegar is a good substitute for shop bought detergent. I always just throw my gear in the washing machine with all the other stuff. Rinse everything well which your machine should do. Sweat is not typically an irritant unless left to get a bit nasty.
If you are sensitive down there, use a chamois creme before you pull on your fresh clean gear. I use a mix of natural oil ( Shea butter the last few years)a few drops of pure tea tree oil and a tablespoon or two of Oronine H ointment all mixed together and it seems to do the trick and also has a pleasant scent. It's also important to get out of your sweaty gear as soon as practical. I don't think cross contamination in a washing machine is possible and maybe the irritation is in the scented detergents softeners that are sold promoting freshness. Those scents are typically irritants.
 
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OPPL200

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A good chamois cream is an absolute must for me when going on longer rides. If nothing else, it smells lovely and makes my balls tingle.
 
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andywood

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All good advice regarding hygiene and reducing friction with chamois cream.

In the short term,

If your saddle sores are not healing by themself, I'd recommend going to a skin doctor and getting a course of antibiotics and a decent cream. Fusidic acid (antibiotic) and betamethasone (steroid) are common active ingredients in effective creams.

In the long term,

Saddle sores are basically abrasions of the skin which then become infected. So if you can stop the abrasions, then with basic hygiene you should be problem free.

I'd say saddle height, fore/ aft position and saddle type is most important in that order.

Get someone in the know to adjust your fit. Minimize any friction. If you have you and the bike set up to reduce friction, then a decent chamois and chamois cream are just the icing on the cake.

Hope it all works itself out!

Andy
 
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MattRyuu

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I ride naked. No need for washing or any sort of clown bells on my handlebars. In all seriousness though, get a damn good bib after following @andywood's advice. Some pretty good reviews over at intheknowcycling.com. Next chamois cream. After that, wash that bib and other skin contacted gear as soon as possible. This goes for your jersey, socks, cap, anything that has been soaking up sweat.
 
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joewein

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If you're worried about bacterial infections, hanging your kit to dry in the sun is pretty good as the UV will gradually sterilize it.

A lot of cycling wear is treated with antibacterial silver, to reduce smells from microbial breakdown of sweat. Aggressive laundry treatment may gradually strip this out. That's why hand washing with mild soap is best.

Unless the skin is injured, the only real concern with bacteria is smell. It's only when you have skin abrasions or similar injuries that bacteria on your clothes become a health issue.
 

thooms

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I cheat the system with my washing machine. I open the lid after it has figured out how much stuff is in there, but before it has started filling the water, and dump a bucket of warm/hot water in.

Most Japanese washing machines probably do this to allow the user to add warm water from the bath. Could be worth a look? Mine's a dirt cheap Haier, for the record.

I've never thought about hand washing though, that's a smart idea. Might do that as it's probably a lot less hard on kit to do that, as well.

If it's a regular occurrence, chamois cream is a real life saver.
 

speedwobble

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Bacteria that cause mega pongs can build up in synthetic clothing in spite of washing. Skiing base layers, Patagonia's Capilene material, used to be notorious for it. Washing in diluted vinegar or lemon juice used to be the way to get rid of it.

I can't say I've had any bother with washing my cycling gear. I use a net thing and have enough kids to ensure it never has to wait long till we do another load. I heard that fabric conditioner wrecks the DWR repellency of jackets, but you can renew it by tumble drying for a short while. I've got a second hand Gabba that it did wonders for. It saves you using Nikwax etc.
 
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baribari

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I just measured myself and it turns out I was actually using bibs that were a size too small... I needed an XXL instead of an XL because I have massive hips for my waist (although that dimension is going down gradually!).

I started riding on some of my older, stretchier bibs and at the very least my sores haven't got worse. Guess it's time to buy some new bibs.