Tech Warped brake pads

wexford

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Jul 3, 2012
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#1
Took the rear pads off tonight to look at them. Have been getting not so good performance out of them and was going to clean them and fix the toe. Was surprised to find that one of them was bulging out in the middle. I thought it was uneven wear at first but then I noticed that the middle of the pad appeared to be out of the metal holder... Image probably explains it better.

I tried removing the little screw holding the rubber in place with the metal but I couldn't slide the pad out of the metal guides. As this is my first bike in decades, I'm not sure if you replace just the rubber bit or the complete rubber/metal holder thing all in one. I guess I'll go visit a bike shop tomorrow and find out as I don't seem to be able to re-sit the rubber myself and don't want to continue using the brake like this.

These are ultegra pads. I guess I'll get the same ones.
 
Dec 21, 2013
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France - moving to Shizuoka
#2
Sometimes you have to tap out the pad - the metal part should be fine - check no damage to the groove etc. Then buy new pads and replace. Make sure that when you fit to the bike it goes the right direction.
 
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Sibreen

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Jul 23, 2010
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#3
Looks like removeable pads set to me.
I've recently moved from DA to Koolstop brake pads (on 105 brakes), and they're a completely different kettle of fish.
 

FarEast

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#5
I've seen this issue before and its basically where the pad was inserted in at a slightly wrong angle and forced in to the pad mount, the edges of the pad holder are sharp and if the pad is forced in they will cut a new grove and cause the pad to sit incorrectly - thus in the image.

It is extremely easy to do this with cork or graphite pads. Replacing you pads is an easy job - seriously far easier than operating a bicycle ;)
 
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#6
@wexford once you've removed the little retaining screw the pad should slide out to the rear of the bike. Check on the other side to see what I mean. You don't normally need to remove the holder from the brake assembly to do this.

In your case, as the pad has become derailed, you might have to 'persuade' it with some pliers. But it will probably then slide right back in and you can carry on using it. Looks like there's plenty of wear left.

If you buy replacement pads, they'll come with a new pair of retaining screws. I always use the new ones, even if the old ones look fine. Being small, they are easily damaged.

Check using the pad from the same side at the front that the rails still work OK. If and only if the rails have somehow become damaged would you need to replace the holders.

As you've already taken the holders off the bike, be careful to put them back on the correct sides. The rotation of the wheel must force the pad into its holder, not out.
 

wexford

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Jul 3, 2012
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#8
Thanks for the replies all. I guess the little bugger is just jammed in place as I was as persuasive as I could be last night without damaging the rubber. Then again - anyone who has seen me climb knows I'm a little weakling so perhaps a little more effort might work. Oh and yes - this was all with the retainer screw out. Thanks for the warnings on the brake pad direction. I'm well aware of what might happen should I get the direction wrong. Hmmm. That might help pop the rubber out!:innocent:

I'll drop by a bike shop tonight and get some spare pads anyway just in case I can't force the bugger out without damaging it.

@Sibreen is the kettle of fish a better kettle of fish or just a different kettle of fish? I can never stop in the rain but then again that could also be tires too.

Tom.
 

Sibreen

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Jul 23, 2010
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#9
@Sibreen is the kettle of fish a better kettle of fish or just a different kettle of fish? I can never stop in the rain but then again that could also be tires too.
A much superior kettle of fish. There's a big enough difference that I'll be replacing the Shimano pads on my single speed with Koolstop in the near future, too.
I've not tested them in the wet, although I do have the wet-weather pads.
 
Likes: wexford
Apr 3, 2012
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Tama Center <-> Otemachi
#10
I've switched to the Swiss Stop green pads, the all weather version. They have a version compatible with Shimano holders and straight forward to get them on. I did have to use wide pliers to get the shoes seated all the way in. After a few months of use, they are wearing well and braking performance is noticeably better compared to the stock Shimano ones. I have not really used them in the wet.

Not clear about your use case but the improved braking performance with after market blocks is a worthwhile change.
 

wexford

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#11
Dropped into Y's yesterday on the way home with the pads in hand. Turns out I'm a weakling as the guy got them out. He did have quite a job getting it out though and was far more aggressive on the rubber than I was. Once out, it was easily re-seated. There was no real damage to the rubber pad or metal so I decided to put off buying new ones for a while longer. Seems like buying the rubber inserts is a lot cheaper than buying the complete metal/rubber combo. That's good to know. I did see the Swiss pads but not the Koolstop. Anyway - happy camper for now. Thanks for the advice everyone.
 

leicaman

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Sep 20, 2012
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#12
I don't quite understand why people need/want better braking power than the stock shimanos offer. For me, the limiting factor is always the tyre. With stock shimano pads , I could, at any given time, lock up the rear wheel or go sailing over the handlebars should I wish to. And that is was a minimal effort at the levers. I've never felt like I needed more power (in the wet, now that's a different story). Do you feel the shimanos lacking in power?
 

TCC

Tokyo Cycling Club
Jun 30, 2013
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#13
I have said this before- if there exists better and more powerful braking than Shimano Dura Ace 9000 brakes, pads and alloy rims, I dont want to experience it.

I can easily lock up the rear with one finger with a full DA9000 set up, and that is with my brakes set as late as I can get them.

I do have the strongest hands and forearms in the club by a massive margin though.
 

Yamabushi

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Jun 1, 2010
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fudoushin.com
#14
I don't quite understand why people need/want better braking power than the stock shimanos offer. For me, the limiting factor is always the tyre. With stock shimano pads , I could, at any given time, lock up the rear wheel or go sailing over the handlebars should I wish to. And that is was a minimal effort at the levers. I've never felt like I needed more power (in the wet, now that's a different story). Do you feel the shimanos lacking in power?
YMMV, but for me compared to the DA pads, both the KoolStops Salmon and the SwissStop GHPII offer superior modulation, power, and feel! The difference is even more pronounced in wet conditions.
 

TCC

Tokyo Cycling Club
Jun 30, 2013
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#15
More modulation- just undo your brakes and stop having them bite 0.01mm away from the rim like a disgusting cringe.

More power- deadlifts and bench, and doing building work and plumbing. And strangling.
 

wexford

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#16
I don't quite understand why people need/want better braking power than the stock shimanos offer. For me, the limiting factor is always the tyre. With stock shimano pads , I could, at any given time, lock up the rear wheel or go sailing over the handlebars should I wish to. And that is was a minimal effort at the levers. I've never felt like I needed more power (in the wet, now that's a different story). Do you feel the shimanos lacking in power?
Not sure if you are asking me or not, but I'd like to stop better in the rain. (In the dry I'd like maybe a tad more control over locking and not locking the wheels although that is probably user related). Stopping in the rain sucks for me though. Can't seem to stop at all quickly. I'm not sure if its the caliper, the pads or the tires. I think its the water on the rim which is why I'm interested in hearing peoples impressions of other pads being able to more effectively get to the braking surface or dry the braking surface? I mostly don't cycle in the rain though but I still get caught out sometimes. For the most part I think I can tune dry braking with the toe whether that is the correct approach or not I've not read up on the subject. Regarding locking tires etc, I guess braking performance is also down to rider weight and weight distribution on the bike, size of tires, surface type etc. I am a weakling though compared to the shop guy so chances are it's just my weak grip:rolleyes:
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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#19
Instant braking improvement:

  • Clean your braking surface with a graphite eraser so they reflect your manliness in all its glory
  • Use the Park Tool or Elite Brake calibration tool for perfect toe-in set up.
  • Replace your brake cables annually
  • Clean your brake pads when you clean the bike and adjust toe-in as well as offset
READ THE ROAD AND LEARN TO BRAKE PROPERLY!

Never in all my years (apart from when I used Campagnolo Delta's) have I ever felt the need for better braking performance and that includes descending Mt Fuji from the 5th station in wet conditions on a closed road after the Japan EliteTour Hill Climb race.
 
Likes: wexford

AlanW

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#20
Never in all my years (apart from when I used Campagnolo Delta's) have I ever felt the need for better braking performance and that includes descending Mt Fuji from the 5th station in wet conditions on a closed road after the Japan EliteTour Hill Climb race.
You have never used Zipp wheels in the wet then. Utterly terrifying.
Good tips.