Help Unexplained gradual loss of strength/fitness - advice sought

jmbattle

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Jun 27, 2010
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Hamamatsu
#1
Good afternoon chaps,

I'm rather concerned about my general health and fitness and would like to request advice from some fellow cyclists.

Last April or so I began noticing that my cycling performance was deteriorating. I grew tired more quickly, became out of breath, and was unable to sustain the usual average and sprinting speeds.

As the spring temperatures began to increase, I also found myself sweating a great deal more than usual, and often feeling a 'prickly heat'/itchy sensation on my body and limbs when out cycling or doing stronger forms of yoga.

I'm 29 and lead what many would consider to be a healthy lifestyle. I don't smoke or drink, eat a mostly raw-food vegetarian diet (albeit including egg yolks and salmon sashimi), cycle 25-30 km a day (more at weekends), and practise various forms of yoga 3-4 times a week. A year or two ago on a summer's Sunday, I would cycle 15 km in the morning, attend an outdoor morning yoga class, ride another 50km around the lake, attend another yoga class, then ride back into town and enjoy a BBQ with friends. I always had plenty of energy, which I attributed to my healthy diet and lifestyle. I was really happy.

Anyway, back to last Spring, my sweating and lack of physical energy was really starting to worry me, so a visited a local naika clinic and explained my symptoms. The doctor performed various blood, urine, and stool tests, along with an X-ray, breathing performance test, and ultrasound. Everything came back negative - he even complemented me on my health, suggesting that I had the breathing capacity of an 18 year old. I visited him on several more occasions, each time to collect another test result, only to be told that everything was perfectly normal. I ask him why he felt I was sweating so excessively, and had limited energy - he believed it was simply a case of this year's summer being hotter than usual. I've lived in Japan for over 7 years, so have lived through my fair share of hot summers, but never had I experienced these symptoms when exercising.

Then disaster - I had an accident while out on my daily lunchtime ride (as documented in this thread), so my concerns switched away from my lack of energy to focus on my injured ankle.

I started light cycling three months or so after the accident, usually just riding to work and purchasing groceries etc. After being given the all-clear by my (ankle) doctor, I gradually stepped-up my cycling until I was more or less back to my regular daily riding routine. However, I was still lacking energy, breathing heavily during light exercise, and sweating a great deal - even though the hottest part of the summer had passed. so I returned to my initial naika doctor, who referred me to one larger hospitals in the city centre. Again, I explained my symptoms, underwent more blood and urine tests, in addition to an MRI scan and an endoscopy. But still nothing - according to their results I was absolutely fine, yet my health hadn't improved. Eventually I exhausted all of the tests available at that hospital, and was more or less told there wasn't nothing else that could be done for me.

So I returned to my riding again, and even though my ankle still didn't feel 100%, just continued to ride daily in an effort to regain my strength and fitness.
I lost around 6kg in the weeks following my accident (presumably through lack of exercise), and with limited mobility in my ankle, I decided to try swimming instead of practising yoga. Swimming was tough - I quickly grew out of breath, and would occasionally feel the same prickly sensation on my skin (as if my body was try to sweat, yet in the water...), however I believed it was the best form of exercise to regain my health and fitness.

At the beginning of November I joined a nearby sports club (closer than the public pools) and have been making a habit of swimming every day, straight after work. I swim breast stroke; 25 lengths (or a 25m pool), then a five minute break stretching in the water, followed by another 25. I hoped that by maintaining this routine, in addition to my 25k of cycling and floor exercises at home, my energy would gradually return. However, the truth is, I actually feel weaker now that I ever have done. This morning I went out riding and it was a real struggle - pedalling into the chilly coastal wind. Even when I reached my halfway point, cycled over the bridge and returned home with the tail wind, I didn't really enjoy the ride. After this, I stopped-off at the gym for a swim, but felt so tired after my 25 lengths just decided to call it a day, have lunch at home, then try again in the afternoon/evening. I was just swimming breast stroke, slowly, but at the end of each stroke was left breathing very heavily. Honestly, if felt like I was 69 not 29!

Well, I've decided to try visiting another hospital, this time a large university hospital in the north of the city. I will also take time off work to concentrate on my health.

Here are a few other points that may be worth mentioning:

- when cycling, my comfortable cruising speed is approximately 25km/h, whereas when I felt healthy it was closer to 35km/h. Moreover, I find it much harder to step-up a gear, and push to a sprinting speed. It's if I have no energy...nothing in the tank. Like I've already been out riding all day, when I'm only half an hour or so into my journey.

- I feel very cold, my hands and feet are icy, and the skin on my finger tips is dry and cracked. So I have to wear lots of layers of clothing in order to keep warm. However, once I'm riding, I'll start to sweat (even if my body still isn't that hot).

- I've noticed a nervous twitch/tick when cycling and swimming...usually when I try to push myself to go faster, or whenever I'm straining by cycling into the wind.

- As noted above, I've lost around 6kg since my accident, and currently weight 66kg. Because of my lifestyle, I've always been skinny, but had quite a toned body, thanks to the yoga and floor exercises/stretches. These days however, I feel like I'm also losing muscle tone, and my face is puffier.

Okay, well, I think that's everything. My apologies for this lengthy post. I realise that this doesn't have a great deal to do with cycling per se, however I know that there are folks here who are very knowledgeable about health and fitness, and being passionate about cycling, and living in Japan...I wanted to post something, just in case others have experienced similar health issues, and can perhaps suggest ways to overcome them. Good health and fitness is incredibly important to me - as I'm sure it is to everyone, so my current condition is terribly concerning.

Many thanks for reading!

Cheers,
James
x
 
Jul 13, 2010
279
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Shinjuku
#2
I am sorry to hear about you health issues.
It sounds like you have been examined by doctors in every way possible without finding anything wrong.

A couple of things that comes to mind though:
Have you had any tests taken during actual exercise?
I believe that it is possible to have health issues that doesn't show up until you physically push yourself. It would be interesting to know if your oxygen saturation looks adequate during the exercise.
Have you taken a glucose tolerance test?

I am NOT a physician so please take my advise for what they are....


I hope you can find out what is going on with your body.

/Andreas
 

FarEast

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#3
Im not a Doctor and I seriously suggest you go to a sports specailist doctor rather than the local clinic and certainly not a University Hospital!

But it really sounds like burn out, you've been pushing the body ridculously hard and now its telling you something.

If the Doc's are telling you that you are in amazing shape then cut back on the excersise. I train no more than 3 times a week and thats both on and off the bike. Looking at your schedule its no wonder you have no energy especailly if you've been doing this for several years without a break.

Also what you are eating to fuel the body is hard and I think its going to be even harder on a vegetarian diet to consume the amount of Kcal you need on a daily basis..... race season I find it hard to consume the 3500+ Kcal I need and thats having meats available.
 
#4
Scary and lame.
If you are in Tokyo, I can reccomend an accupuncturist-- because western medicine is not helping you.

Personally, I gave up wheat this october in kind of a last ditch effort to get migraines under control-- and it's been a huge difference in energy levels, fewer headaches and migraines than in years. Its annoying but so very worth it to me Apparently in the late 20s/30s it's not an uncommon thing to have your body shift to liking/disliking foods.

What do your yoga mentors say?
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#5
As koribeyer mentions about the whole wheat thing, you should get tested for being a Celiac, my mother is a Celiac, which means her body does not handle gluten well, and it can really mess with you. It is VERY hard to get tested here in Japan, I tried about two years ago, and only found a Uni hospital up in Nagano that would do the test. There is a lot of info on Celiac on the web, so maybe you should look into that?
Maybe you should also see a sports nutritionist, it sounds like you are close to being a Vegan, or such, and maybe there is something that you are not getting in your diet that, over time is causing this to happen?
Your health is one of your most precious gifts, and I fully understand why you are concerned, keep looking and asking questions.

Cheers!
 

jdd

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Jul 26, 2008
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#6
Since this pre-dates your ankle injury, it is likely separate from that. I say likely, but I am not a doc.

Posts above suggest going to, and also avoiding uni-hospitals. That seems confusing to me--the local one is 'supposed' to be good, and I've had specific docs there recommended to me, but OTOH, I also know (and this is certainly something different) that they don't like to deal with chronic, palliative care patients--they like to be aggressive in their approach.

How long has it been since you've had a full physical? Perhaps you should opt for a complete one, since they might find something with an overall general look that they might not see when responding to and thinking about specific symptoms that you've presented them with.

Also, tho you don't mention them, things like:
Chronic fatigue syndrome,
Mononucleosis,
...or something similar as possible?
 

FarEast

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#7
Ok my wife works in THE industry. Uni hospitals do not get the same exposure to patients and surgeries that public hospital doctors do. The Japanese Oylimpic surgeons all work in public hospitals for this reason.... more surguries, more consultings and they aren't up their own arses.

She knows her stuff as she worked in the Tokyo Blood and Heart Research Hospital in Roppongi and some other famous places and we met while she was in the UK teaching and practicing.

I suggest taking a month off the training you seem to be doing maybe hit the Yoga and bike once a week at the most and enjoy the winter vactions. Then go back to the bike and see if anything has changed. If not go get a full work out by a sports specailist.
 

jmbattle

Warming-Up
Jun 27, 2010
14
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0
Hamamatsu
#8
Good evening chaps,

Many thanks for your prompt replies and kind words of support.

I'll try to answer some of the question you raise directly:

japanviking said:
Have you had any tests taken during actual exercise?
I believe that it is possible to have health issues that doesn't show up until you physically push yourself. It would be interesting to know if your oxygen saturation looks adequate during the exercise.
I had an ECG that tested my heart rate both before and after a five minute period of climbing up and down a small staircase (three steps, two down), however I have not taken any kind of test while under physical exertion such as cycling or running on a treadmill. I actually enquired into the possibility of doing this (I believe it usually involves electrodes attached to your body, in addition to a mask/tube to test breathing capacity, correct?), but was told that none of the hospitals in the area had such facilities.

japanviking said:
Have you taken a glucose tolerance test?
Yes, I believe so. There is a history of diabetes on both my father and mother's side - indeed, my mother is diabetic - thus this is another test I requested. Again, negative.

FarEast said:
Im not a Doctor and I seriously suggest you go to a sports specailist doctor rather than the local clinic and certainly not a University Hospital!
A sports specialist doctor would certainly be worth pursuing - I will have to enquire about this when I visit the university hospital. To clarify, I visited a local naika clinic first, and was then referred to a larger hospital here. The university hospital meanwhile is one of the largest medical facilities in the city - it's a proper hospital, not just a place to train doctors.

FarEast said:
But it really sounds like burn out, you've been pushing the body ridculously hard and now its telling you something.

If the Doc's are telling you that you are in amazing shape then cut back on the excersise. I train no more than 3 times a week and thats both on and off the bike. Looking at your schedule its no wonder you have no energy especailly if you've been doing this for several years without a break.
I see the point you're making, but I don't feel like I was exercising *that* strenuously - just enjoying a hobby. The doctors were not necessarily telling me I was in great shape - just noting that according to the tests, there's nothing wrong with me. If I was an average 29 year old kaishain who did absolutely no exercise like some of my colleagues, I probably wouldn't be concerned. However, I'm obviously rather more active than that, but right now my current health and fitness is preventing me from doing the things I enjoy the most.

FarEast said:
Also what you are eating to fuel the body is hard and I think its going to be even harder on a vegetarian diet to consume the amount of Kcal you need on a daily basis..... race season I find it hard to consume the 3500+ Kcal I need and thats having meats available.
Yes, I agree. I don't consume anywhere near 3500 calories per day, however I personally don't feel most modern adults require this amount of energy. My job is office based, sat at a computer from 8am-5pm. We have ten minute breaks at 10am and 3pm (during which I do stretching and star jumps etc.), and 40 minutes for lunch (which I use as cycling time). More calories would be great, but it's finding the time to consume them!

koribeyer said:
Scary and lame.
If you are in Tokyo, I can reccomend an accupuncturist-- because western medicine is not helping you.
I hear you man! Believe me, I'm a strong advocate of alternative medicine. I have visited an acupuncturist recommended by a friend who, as a surfer, has suffered numerous injuries throughout his sporting life. This chap swears by him. I originally visited the therapist to help the mobility in my ankle, but during the first consultation, also explained about my low energy levels, sweating, etc. The treatment went well, however the following day my ankle felt very sore - almost as it did when the plaster cast was first removed. I understand that acupuncture requires several treatments before one begins to notice the benefits, however that incident scared me somewhat. I even wondered if the visit may have aggravated the injury.

koribeyer said:
Personally, I gave up wheat this october in kind of a last ditch effort to get migraines under control-- and it's been a huge difference in energy levels, fewer headaches and migraines than in years. Its annoying but so very worth it to me Apparently in the late 20s/30s it's not an uncommon thing to have your body shift to liking/disliking foods.
It's interesting to hear your experiences of a changed diet. As mentioned in my previous, I am a raw-food pesco vegetarian, and have been for almost five years. I don't eat bread, rice, noodles, beans (soy), however I do consume organic oats - soaked in either cold or boiling water. I drink a lot of smoothies (banana mostly, but add other fruits/vegetable depending on the season), and use the softened oats and olive oil as a base. I went out for another short swim this evening and upon returning home ate a bowl of softened oats, olive oil, two mashed bananas, and three egg yolks - it probably doesn't sound terribly tasty, but I love it..and it's a pretty nutritious post-exercise snack. ;)

koribeyer said:
What do your yoga mentors say?
My main tutor knows that my mobility and flexibility has deteriorated as a result of my injury, so on the occasions when I do join her class, she will recommend alternative poses that don't stress my ankle too much. I explained a couple of times that my energy is now very low, so she has suggested I try to focus on breathing exercises. I haven't told her that this drop in energy happened before my ankle accident...actually, I'm somewhat embarrassed to tell too many people how I'm really feeling. Most of the people I know consider me to be a fit and healthy person who lives on fruits and vegetables and cycles everywhere - I'm often the guy folks come to asking advice about improving their health/diet etc. For me not to be healthy is perhaps as alien to them as it is to me.

StuInTokyo said:
As koribeyer mentions about the whole wheat thing, you should get tested for being a Celiac, my mother is a Celiac, which means her body does not handle gluten well, and it can really mess with you. It is VERY hard to get tested here in Japan, I tried about two years ago, and only found a Uni hospital up in Nagano that would do the test. There is a lot of info on Celiac on the web, so maybe you should look into that?
I've looked into Celiacs disease also, and asked the doctor at the hospital if I can be tested for wheat/gluten and other grain allergies. Unfortunately, he was unfamiliar with the term - I wrote it down for him in both romaji and katakana, but it wasn't even in his medical dictionary. As you say, it would appear to be very rare in Japan, although I did once have a JET friend who suffered from the disease, so will have to drop her a line. As noted above, I do eat quite a lot of oats (currently 200g per day - 100g in my smoothies, 100g after returning home from swimming), however I believe this grain is safe for celiacs sufferers, with the only risk being from contamination with other grains in processing plants.

StuInTokyo said:
Maybe you should also see a sports nutritionist, it sounds like you are close to being a Vegan, or such, and maybe there is something that you are not getting in your diet that, over time is causing this to happen?
Yep, that's a good call. But where do you find a sports nutritionist over here? I'm not strictly vegan as I still consume raw egg yolks and sashimi. However, aside from this and my soft oats, the rest of my diet is made up of fruits, nuts, and vegetables. I like to think I have a pretty complete diet, although I've never studied nutrition formally. As you say though, it could just be one mineral or vitamin that is deficient...and something that has yet to show up in any of the tests I've undergone.

jdd said:
Since this pre-dates your ankle injury, it is likely separate from that. I say likely, but I am not a doc.
Yes, I agree. In fact, the philosopher inside me is inclined to believe that the accident and subsequent injury may have been intended to slow me down, take stock, and try to get to the root of this larger health issue.

jdd said:
How long has it been since you've had a full physical? Perhaps you should opt for a complete one, since they might find something with an overall general look that they might not see when responding to and thinking about specific symptoms that you've presented them with.
Well, I have the annual health checks, just like every other company employee, however they're not terribly detailed - it's certainly not a full physical check over. Pardon my ignorance, but is this something I should request upon visiting the hospital?

jdd said:
Also, tho you don't mention them, things like:
Chronic fatigue syndrome,
One doctor suggested Chronic Fatigue syndrome, and referred me to a psychotherapist at another hospital (the university hospital, as it happens...). I waited several hours to see this chap, and once I was eventually called in he read through the other doctor's referral notes, asked me a few questions about my mental health, then proclaimed "I don't know why you're here - I don't think you have 慢性疲労症候群.", then referred me back to the previous doctor. I took the entire day off work for that five minute consultation... perhaps I should have asked for a second opinion?

[post continues]
 

jmbattle

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Jun 27, 2010
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#9
Well, I hope that answers some of your questions chaps - once again, thank you so much for your useful suggestions. As I mentioned above, I haven't told too many people about my true health situation, so I'm terribly grateful to finally get talking about all this. This is a great forum!

Cheers,
James
x
 

GSAstuto

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www.roadfixie.com
#10
Couldn't agree more with James. As a person who recovered from a very serious leg injury, I can tell you that sports-centric professionals have a much deeper understand and more common exposure to various illnesses and injuries that are caused by a hyper-active (yes, thats what we are) lifestyle - or show up under that stress. And they7ll be able to get you on track with conditioning PT progams that work.

BTW - you can get full cardio / lactate / vo analysis done at the Tokyo Metro Gym - and this includes a consultation by a sports physician. Its a good way to get a benchmark reading of 'your engine'. Subjective comparison is not always accurate mode of determining your conditioning.

CFS is a bitch to diagnose because it could be the culmination of several interacting issues - including mental. Allergies are oftentimes culprits of extended low energy periods and especially blood borne yeast infections and candidas related. You need to get tested especially for this. Its not likely to show up in a standard CBC / BMP scan. You can ask for these extended tests from your physician - it just costs extra for the lab work and you may need to get referred to a specialist - that's fine - just tell your physician you have that concern and want a referral. Japanese medial system is very gracious about these things.

Again - get some good data from professionals in your field of activity or concern. That can't be stressed enough. And don't stop until you feel you either have the answer or are comfortable with the situation.
 

StuInTokyo

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#11
.........CFS is a bitch to diagnose because it could be the culmination of several interacting issues - including mental. Allergies are oftentimes culprits of extended low energy periods and especially blood borne yeast infections and candidas related.......
GSAstuto's comment here made me think of the dreaded Kafunsho, or hayfever. I've lived here in Japan for 20+ years now, and my wife and both of my daughters suffer from this to varying degrees, I was immune to it, but last year, I too started to show signs of it. The docs checked and yep, I now have Kafunsho, and when the levels get very bad, I too suffer, it is something that you can become allergic to with long term exposure.

Trying to figure this kind of thing out by yourself is a challenge, but you certainly seem up for it, and you are obviously informed. You are your own best advocate, keep asking questions, my mom likes to say that "MD behind a doctor's name does NOT mean 'Minor Deity' " so question and ask for more info.
 

Sikochi

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Sep 13, 2010
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#12
I paraphrased your post
previous routine:-
cycle 25-30 km a day (more at weekends),
practise various forms of yoga 3-4 times a week.
summer's Sunday, I would cycle 15 km in the morning, attend an outdoor morning yoga class, ride another 50km around the lake, attend another yoga class, then ride back into town

current routine:
swimming every day, straight after work. I swim breast stroke; 25 lengths (or a 25m pool), then a five minute break stretching in the water, followed by another 25.
25k of cycling and floor exercises at home
We have ten minute breaks at 10am and 3pm (during which I do stretching and star jumps etc.), and 40 minutes for lunch (which I use as cycling time).
As FarEast says, my speculation would be simple over-training caused by some form of (if you don`t mind me saying) exercise addiction. I wouldn`t describe your schedule as just pursuing a hobby: your exercise schedule is probably above some pro-triathletes. If you put all the various forms of exercise together, you are probably not far off doing the equivalent of an olympic distance triathlon every day.

When are your rest periods? Or recovery sessions? You shouldn`t be doing more than the 3/4 training sessions a week, and any more exercise should be done as recovery. I note you say that you don`t feel you exercise `strenuously` but if you are going beyond recovery level, then it is strenuous for your body.

If you exercise, the adaptations (increased fitness) occur when your body is stressed beyond its current limit but then the body needs time to rest and repair the tissue that is damaged from this stressing and that is where the adaptations (increased fitness/strength) occur. Your body sounds like it has been over-stressed for a long period of time without enough rest and it is now showing the effects.

Here`s a couple of quick articles on overtraining.
http://www.slowtwitch.com/mainheadings/coachcorn/overtraining.html

http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2009/05/overtraining-threshold.html
 

FarEast

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#13
Sikochi...... he's training way more than I am which is why I raised burn out... seriously

jmbattle, you seem a little closed to what Im telling you and seem to be focused on that its your body thats at fault.

I seriously think you are fried.... you're over training and the lack of power is a result of this. 40 minute bike ride at lunch time 15 minutes bike rides in the morning and after work 3 Yoga classes a week then more riding at the weekend..... all on a almost vegan diet. I'm getting burnt out just thinking about it!

Take a break, seriously take a month off and totally off the training and then come back and see what the body is doing. You should have completely stopped the moment you start consulting medical experts.

Oh, and the Uni hospital specailist sent you away without a proper diagnostic? Typical. :D Like I said go to a public hospital.....bigger isn't better.
 

jmbattle

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Jun 27, 2010
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Hamamatsu
#14
Sikochi, FarEast,

Thank you once again for your replies, and for posting the articles about over-training.

I hadn't really considered the possibility of over-training, largely because I don't really consider what I'm doing to be 'training' - it's just exercise that is integrated within my daily routine.

But do you really believe that cycling around 1 hr. a day (and spread over three rides throughout the day) is too much? I know folks that do more than this on a mamma-chari.

Regarding yoga, the classes I used to attend ranged from hatha (breathing) to ashtanga (movement and stretching) styles, so it was a nice balance of activity and restorative relaxation. I attended yoga after work as it helped me to unwind and stretch-out after sitting at a computer for several hours - it wasn't really intended as a calorie burning work-out.

FarEast, I apologise if I sound closed to your suggestions. I'd like to think I'm pretty in tune with my body, and through practising yoga understand the importance of listening to one's inner-voice, taking time to rest etc. When my leg was in plaster, colleagues kindly took it in turns driving me to the office and the supermarket for my groceries. For the best part of a month my routine was essentially: wake up, eat, drive to the office, sit down at a computer for 4 hours, eat, work for another 4 hours, drive home, eat, and then go to bed. I was doing very little exercise and felt absolutely terrible as a result.

Again, thank you very much for your useful replies chaps - I will go away and read those over-training articles.

Cheers,
James
x
 

StuInTokyo

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#15
James, I just got off talking with my mom on Skype, our daughter is over in Canada going to school so we talk each week on Skype, got to love that Skype.

My mom says that Oats are certainly NOT gluten free, unless you are specifically buying oats that are gluten free, which are hard to find and expensive, she says.
She mentioned that you should have your B-12 levels checked, there is a condition called "Pernicious Anemia" that would match your general symptoms, especially the prickly sensation on your skin, which can be the onset of numbness. My mother had this problem, it often goes hand in hand with the Celiac disease, because your body is not getting enough B-12. Do some more research on this and see if you can have your B-12 levels checked.

The other thing she mentioned that was more of a general symptom thing is your Thyroid, an over, or under active Thyroid can cause a lot of these same problems.

I profess no expertise in any of this, I'm just relating what my mom passed along, she too is no doctor, but she has a long experience dealing with her own health issues over the years. She now gets monthly B-12 shots and this has solved her Pernicious Anemia problem almost completely, except for the fact that the shots hurt for about two days afterwards :D

I hope this helps, keep at it, you will find out what is wrong and right it!

Stu
 
#16
The consensus sounds like you should find a really good nutritionist, especially one who focuses on athletes. If you feel that your health is in serious decline, you might need to go to a bigger city to find a good enough doctor.

Different bodies need different things and your needs change, right. A friend of my family was totally OCD about food and only ate peanuts, a specific type of fruit juice...and maybe one or two other things. Very weird. But somehow he was totally ok, until he switched to a different type of fruit juice and everything went haywire. (when they figured it out, he was ok again) Point being, it sounds like you are on a very specific diet and even if it worked before your body could have changed or the people manufacturing the oats or whatever could have changed.

A coworker has Pernicious Anemia (diagnosed in Britain) and has found it very hard to find a doctor who knows anything about it here. Apparently his blood levels of B12 are fine but his liver levels get depleted... or something weird like that. Hard to diagnosis, apparently. But the damage can be lasting if it isn't treated.

Get someone who knows what they are doing to really assess how much nutrition and calories you need and how much you are actually consuming. Your ideas vs what this forum is guess are very different, so seek a good professional. Competent people are hard to find but this sounds serious. right?

As for acupuncture, the first time I did it I felt like I'd been hit by a truck for 3 days. But I trusted him and we've worked together to find what works. Much like a massage, it's common to be sore the next day. It's probably not for everyone, but as you are already an alternative health type of person (diet, yoga), it seems up your alley. But again, you need to find someone who you can build a real relationship with.

Good luck.
 

andywood

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#17
just skimmed over this thread so apologies if I missed something

breathing sounds like asthma. Doctors are quick to tell you you have or don't have asthma but the best way to find out is to try some medication and see for yourself

whether a diet is vegetarian or not is not the issue,if you have a good balanced diet, you can live an athletic lifestyle. I've been vegetarian since I was 10 years all and don't think my performance suffers because of it

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

FarEast

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#20
agreed.... although I do like a bit of dead flesh slightly cooked on my plate. Although huge respect to those that prefer to dine without sacrificial offerings.