Review Ultra-light bike bag

#1
(And I'm not talking about bin-liners and packing tape)

On the Boso Ride yesterday, I had a few favorable comments about my light-weight bike-bag: it covers the bare minimum to make the bike "legal" on the train (and you carry the front wheel in your hand). So here it is:

http://item.rakuten.co.jp/ride-on/rr08marui490/

If you leave the superfluous straps at home and use just the cover it weights less than 200 grams - about the weight of three power bars - and rolls up compact enough to fit in your jersey pocket...

Cheers
Steve
 

TOM

Maximum Pace
#2
Thanks

Steve... this one looks very minimal and I like the back-wheel-on feature! Should fit nicely in a normal bottle cage, right? I've been looking for the right rinko bag for a long time, most are too heavy and big and I don't like having to remove the back wheel, missing the train and then having to wait one hour for the next one to arrive:eek:.

BTW, my friend Nishibe-san, met you at the mountain hut on top of Odarumi-toge the other day...

(And I'm not talking about bin-liners and packing tape)

On the Boso Ride yesterday, I had a few favorable comments about my light-weight bike-bag: it covers the bare minimum to make the bike "legal" on the train (and you carry the front wheel in your hand). So here it is:

http://item.rakuten.co.jp/ride-on/rr08marui490/

If you leave the superfluous straps at home and use just the cover it weights less than 200 grams - about the weight of three power bars - and rolls up compact enough to fit in your jersey pocket...

Cheers
Steve
 
#3
TOM, I didn't realise you were the type to use the train... :confused:
But yes, fits in a bottle cage no problem - and what I often do is roll it up and pop into one of those bottle shaped storage containers so it looks kinda sleek on the bike.

Ah yes, you Possitivo Expresso guys are everywhere ! Do say a yoroshiku to Nishibe-san for me -
 
May 22, 2007
3,591
1,416
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#5
Re: EZ-rap

I've been using this product for 15 months or so, now. Minimalist, as you say.

The strap buckles are weak and break easily so now I have to tie a knot rather than use the buckles. Shoulder strap is still useful to have for securing the bike to a handrail; prevents the bike from flying down the car and inconveniencing other passengers during sudden train braking.

Best thing is I can be bagged and walking in less than 3 minutes!

--Mike--
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#6
A cracking bag: lots lighter than the equivalent Ostrich bag where you only take one wheel off; as well as the Ostrich where you take both wheels off.

Bought it through Amazon for the equivalent price of a load of gomi bags and tape. Also, fits in the back pocket with no problems.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#7
Hmmm I have a Ostrich bag where you take one wheel off and its ultra compact.... used it on the Tour De Westside ride and it fitted in one of my jersey pockets which it shared with some food.... no idea of the weight though.
 

sakura

Cruising
May 15, 2009
29
0
11
Tokyo
#8
FarEast,

Do you happen to know which Ostrich bag you have? From their website, it looks like they only make two front-wheel removable-only bags, the "Chosoku Five" and the "Chosoku Five Stonger."

I've been shopping for a rinko and was going to go with the Ostrich's SL-100 (requires both F/R wheel removal) until I saw this post. I'm all for convenience and want to strike the right balance between portability and ease of use.

With such a low price point (and the fact that I don't have to dick around with the rear wheel), I may end up going with the Tioga bag.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#9
Sakura,

when I get home I will look at what model I have and take some photos, basically I walked in to the shop and asked for the smallest, lightest bike bag that they had.
 

Richard

Warming-Up
Feb 28, 2009
11
0
0
Shibuya
#10
Even lighter (half-a) bike bag ...

I recently purchased a lightweight Ostrich bike bag but before I ever used it came to the conclusion that I can't be bothered with the hassle of removing the rear wheel (any takers?). I also wasn't too impressed that there was no internal pockets for the wheels (other Ostrich models appear to), meaning I would have to attach them to my carbon frame and risk scratching it - definitely not an option!

The EZ Rap looks like an interesting product, but does anyone have any thoughts on whether I'd be allowed to take my bike on the train using the product below from Scicon? Very light at only 50 grams (if you believe their claimed weight) and one would assume just as compact for when riding!

Cheers

Richard
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#12
I'm not sure why people are reluctant to take off their back wheel.:confused: It takes me no more time taking it off than the front wheel and just a few seconds more putting it back in. It's really very easy when you have practice.:) I do it on almost every ride because I don't like the idea of having to do loop rides with lots of kilometers wasted inside Tokyo or on the Tamagawa.:p

I have a Tagra (spelling?) bike bag which I bought at Friends' Shokai. Added stabilizers to protect the rear gear shifter recently. Both fit into a bag that is small enough to fit into a bottle holder and weighs less than a bottle filled with water.:D

I never leave home without the bike bag - it gives me the perfect freedom to decide where to go and where to stop, just as I feel or as the weather pleases. That way I've cycled to places as far as Nagano-ken and Gunma-ken, all the way from Tokyo, and was back in no time thanks to the Shinkansen.:warau:

With practice, it takes me just a few minutes to pack or unpack the bike. Actually, the most time-consuming bit is to squeeze the bike bag and assessoirs into the compression bag. But even that can be sped up with practice.
 

Deej

Maximum Pace
Oct 13, 2007
1,018
149
83
Setagaya
#13
I'm not sure why people are reluctant to take off their back wheel.:confused:
Because for mere mortals, removing/installing the rear wheel can be a pain in the arse, if only because the hands (and then pants and jersey) can get oily. Then there's the issue of having to worry about the rear derailleur not getting bent.

And wasn't it you whose derailleur got bent on a train? ;)
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
2,512
639
133
Kanazawa
#17
re: removing the rear wheel

I always carry 2-3 latex examination gloves in my patch kit (buy 'em by the box at the Musashi home center) just in case I have a rear wheel flat. A couple extra and removing the rear wheel and putting it back on would be mess-free.

Simple, light, cheap, and mess free. Mushashi has two or three grades. The lightest/cheapest ones tear if your not careful, the blue ones are heavier duty.

Also good for other messy things--picking up dog poo, or keeping your non-knife hand clean when chopping up a pile of dead meat for dinner.
 
May 22, 2007
3,591
1,416
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#18
Re: latex gloves are...

...Also good for other messy things--picking up dog poo, or keeping your non-knife hand clean when chopping up a pile of dead meat for dinner.
Don't forget first aid, body cavity searches, and as makeshift balloons at impromptu parties.

Latex allergies are not uncommon, though. Prefer Nitrile for hypo-allergenicity and durability. Latex degrades in seconds with my chain degreaser.

Prefer a one-wheel-off bag myself, but can remove and attach a rear wheel without contacting oily parts 9 times out of 10. Messy wheels coated in marmalised brake shoe dust are another matter... so I carry gloves too.

Oh... officer!

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--Mike--