Race Tokyo-Itoigawa 2016

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,865
1,451
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#5
I have a question. Why would those guys agree to let you win. I mean they can sit on your wheel anyway if they want to right. Or they can do a little bit of work and still put themselves in the position to win?
Or was it that they were hammered and figured it was take the wheel for a place or get dropped and maybe overtaken by the next riders?

The other question i have is - Do you think your training program has made you stronger than the other years you've won?
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,714
1,359
133
Niigata
#6
I have a question. Why would those guys agree to let you win. I mean they can sit on your wheel anyway if they want to right. Or they can do a little bit of work and still put themselves in the position to win?
Or was it that they were hammered and figured it was take the wheel for a place or get dropped and maybe overtaken by the next riders?

The other question i have is - Do you think your training program has made you stronger than the other years you've won?
To the first question, I'd say they were concerned that Nishitani san was coming from behind. He is one of the best riders in Japan.

A few years ago they worked me over, attack after attack, the end result was we all finished way down the standings.

Last year I managed to drop them on the last big climb and put 30 minutes into them in the last 80 kms. So, yes I think they thought they could get the best possible result by sitting on.

As for the training program helping me.

Present condition: I feel stronger than in recent years. Training Peaks data indicates I am stronger now than my peak in mid July last year.

Specific training: The specific training I did meant that I felt strong to the end of the race. And I rode the race in the way I had planned (in the way the training was focused).

Resting: I used to rest for 2 days before. This year I did 2 weeks of pretty much rest. Focusing on resting, sleeping and fueling.

Self confidence: In an event like this confidence and mental focus is very important. Despite having a cold I was confident that I could carry out the job in the way I had planned.

Generally speaking I would say a training program has helped me to be in top condition each time I line up at a race. No hit and miss. No guess work.

If you are looking to target a race or event I would definitely recommend giving @Doug3 a shout. It's been nothing but an eye opening experience for me.

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
385
141
73
46
#7
Great result Andy, how do they get the same starting time as you each time? Wouldn't it be better for them to start 30 mins after you and work together to chase you down? 2 Vs 1 they should have you.
 
Likes: andywood

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,714
1,359
133
Niigata
#8
Great result Andy, how do they get the same starting time as you each time? Wouldn't it be better for them to start 30 mins after you and work together to chase you down? 2 Vs 1 they should have you.
You can ask for a specific start time but it's not guaranteed.

Generally fastest riders from the previous year go last. Ovest have a special exception and have a special additional time slot (this year 30 mins behind me).

Three years ago those two started an hour before me. I caught them in Naoetsu and pulled them to the finish.

So without wanting to sound ala grande tete, I'm confident they wouldn't get near me... haha!

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
385
141
73
46
#9
So screw with them and choose a different time if you feel they might ambush you. Great blog entries, you feel stronger, do you have a power meter on your bike?
 
Likes: andywood

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,714
1,359
133
Niigata
#10
You can ask for a start time but it's not guaranteed and if they are allocated the same start time there isn't anything you can do about it. So you have to plan for a few different scenarios.

Yes, I use a power meter. I've spent a lot of time this year working on improving my functional threshold power for this event.

My next main target is the UCI Gran Fondo in Hokkaido in July. The demands of this race will be quite different so I will be working on hillclimbing and short duration power over the coming weeks.

For the actual event I wasn't looking at power. I was looking at heart rate.

It was 100% aerobic. Average heart rate 143. Maximum heart rate 175.


4% zone 1
53% zone 2
39% zone 3
4% zone 4

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

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leicaman

Maximum Pace
Sep 20, 2012
2,561
2,254
133
Asakadai, Saitama
#11
Great result, Andy. Good to see a Chaddy lad showing them how it is done. I saw the route on Strava and was confused as the route finished (or started, it sure which) near Yamanashi. Did your battery die at that point?
 
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andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,714
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Niigata
#12
Like Paris-Roubaix, it doesn't start in Paris!

It used to start at Takao station.

Takao〜Kofu〜Fujimi〜Suwa ko〜Matsumoto〜Omachi〜Itoigawa

The last stretch from Omachi (after Hakuba) wasn't very pleasant because of all the long dark scary tunnels.

5 years ago they changed the end:

... Matsumoto〜Nagano〜Joetsu〜Itoigawa

It's a more beautiful and more challenging route.

But to keep the distance roughly the same, they moved the start to Kofu.

Personally I'd like to try it from Takao. But that would be 360 km (?) so difficult logistically perhaps.

So yes, Yamanashi 〜 Itoigawa! Seeing Fuji at the start and the Japan Sea at the end has a nice feel to it anyway...

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time

PS - Royton not Chadderton!