To helmet or not, gas and fire

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#3
The problem with these surveys is that they are selective. It's like the recent information issued by the Japanese Road Safety Institute with figures that show that the fatal accident rates for high risk drivers from 18-24 years old is at an all time low.

What they don't tell you is that there is a population decline in this age bracket and that also the percentage v population of those taking thier driving tests is also at an all time low, while the percentageof those that do pass but go on to become paper drivers.

I wouldn't be suprised if these numbers released in New Zealand are also selective. Also the premature deaths due to wearing a helmet is non-information. We need to know why these helmets actually caused the death - were they the wrong size, worn incorrectly, damaged, etc.
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,661
477
103
Japan
#4
James said "The problem with these surveys is that they are selective".

Absolutely there has also been a huge increase in sport cycling and with sport cycling the risks are inherently higher. Freestyle and streetstyle BMX(sports usually associated with younger folks), who heard of those in 1984? The proliferation of MTB has also greatly increased bicycle related accidents. I feel surveys or studies such as these are selectively filtered to arrive at the conclusion that was already preconceived. Trouble is the peer review never grabs the headlines.To quote Yellowgiant "Rubber down".
 

baribari

Maximum Pace
May 28, 2010
428
80
48
Fukushima
#6
The one time I actually crashed on a road bike, I hit my head and cracked my helmet. I think probably would have survived the crash without a helmet, but I wouldn't have pedaled home that day.

When it comes to road bikes, If you don't wear a helmet you are an idiot.

If you're pedaling a mama-chari at 10 km/h I can definitely see why you might not see the need, but it's still a better idea to wear one.

Invest in a top-grade helmet. They're so light and the airflow is so good you can't tell you're wearing one anyway.
 
Aug 17, 2007
121
0
36
Yotsuya, Tokyo
#9
The medium might be the message

I wonder if wearing a helmet does more psychologically than physically. What I mean is that even if there are stats & studies to prove that helmets do not always guarantee safety during a crash, or may even, in fact, contribute to greater damage from brain torsion or neck whip-lash, the simple act of wearing one alerts the subconscious to the idea that cycling is an activity with elevated risk and the potential to deliberately place someone in harm's way. By equipping ourselves with protective gear, we are admitting to ourselves that we are about to put ourselves at risk. Do we, then, modify our riding habits accordingly, either overtly and consciously, or subconsciously and in imperceptible ways?

I'm not a psychologist, and this idea does not account for an elevation in risk-taking behavior by some persons who think they are protected against even the most egregious of accidents simply because they've thrown on a helmet. Other sports that attract more than their fair share of horrendous accidents are skate-boarding and Parkour. Many YouTubes show people engaging in reckless behavior without any protection at all. Would we expect to see any drop in the number and severity of accidents in these sports if protective equipment were enforced? Who knows. Do we drive more aggressively because cars have become much safer recently? Or do we take driving more seriously because we have licenses, and buckle up before each trip?

Just a few thoughts...:confused:
 

baribari

Maximum Pace
May 28, 2010
428
80
48
Fukushima
#11
I wonder if wearing a helmet does more psychologically than physically. What I mean is that even if there are stats & studies to prove that helmets do not always guarantee safety during a crash, or may even, in fact, contribute to greater damage from brain torsion or neck whip-lash, the simple act of wearing one alerts the subconscious to the idea that cycling is an activity with elevated risk and the potential to deliberately place someone in harm's way. By equipping ourselves with protective gear, we are admitting to ourselves that we are about to put ourselves at risk. Do we, then, modify our riding habits accordingly, either overtly and consciously, or subconsciously and in imperceptible ways?
By that logic, soldiers shouldn't wear body armor because they're more likely to be shot while wearing it...

And you shouldn't wear a seat belt or use an airbag because they cause bruising and broken noses.
 

trad

Maximum Pace
Dec 4, 2006
393
30
48
Tokyo
#13
Ditto. When a car took me out at close to 60kph while stopped at a red light, the helmet kept protecting even when one side was crushed paper thin and the thing cracked thru in 14 places.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,429
874
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#16
I crashed my bike last Saturday and was saved by my helmet. The visor of the helmet took the brunt of the impact. It popped out and swung back over the top of the helmet while absorbing the energy.

I still ended up with cuts and bruises in my face, but I don't even want to think about what I'd have looked like if it was my nose or chin that took the hit from the concrete instead of the plastic.

If you have a brain worth protecting, protect it.