To Grease or Not to Grease......

Forsbrook

Maximum Pace
Feb 13, 2008
399
64
48
Katsushika-ku
#1
......that is the question.

This weekend I'll hopefully be building up a new bike.
I think I'll be able to manage most of the jobs,however....
The only query I have is do I have to grease the steerer tube or not?
Both the frame and forks are steel and I'm installing them into a Chris King headset.
Thanks in advance.
 

Forsbrook

Maximum Pace
Feb 13, 2008
399
64
48
Katsushika-ku
#3
Yes - although its more to make it water tight than to actually keep it smooth.
Many thanks,Far East.

I've been searching high and low on the Internet for a definitive answer to no avail.

May I take this opportunity to tell you how proud I am of your cycling endeavours over here.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#4
Cheers mate, raced back in the UK to.

But I may be heading to your neck of the woods to race during the summer - or your winter to be exact as I want as many UCI points before the start of the Japanese CX season.
 

Forsbrook

Maximum Pace
Feb 13, 2008
399
64
48
Katsushika-ku
#5
Far East,

Whatever you do I'm sure that I won't be the only one who'll be checking on how you are doing worldwide.

I thank you for your many contributions on this site and long may they continue.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#6
Boeshield. If the frame is fresh, I'd give it a good spray. If you can't get Boeshield, then use Waxoyl (you're in UK, right? ) , if not that, then CRC makes a similar rust preventative. These spray on, foam a bit, actually embed into the steel surface then semi-dry to a slightly waxy film. You can spray this into all the tubes and anywhere there is bare steel. Framebuilders will generally pre-treat a frame, but, hey this is cheap insurance in case they didn't.

If you have the CK's with the stainless steel bearings, nothing is really required, though you might apply a little teflon based grease to simply reduce the inter-metal adhesion. The bearings themselves are already sealed and no further grease is required. I prefer the FinishLine Extreme Fluoro as it also prevents galling when you press the bearing cups into the headtube (if you're using a pressfit style). This stuff is great for the BB cartdridges as well - and it's also quite good for lubricating ceramic bearings (the balls themselves). Some mechanics prefer to use Locktite Bearing Mount (like 640) - as it provides extra adhesion without corrosion - good for BB30's more so, IMO.

Bear in mind - anytime you have dissimilar metals in contact with each other, you will have some added corrosion / adhesion issues. If you can isolate these parts, somewhat, with a bonding agent, insulation or lubricant, then that corrosion effect will be reduced. This goes for carbon-to-metal contact as well.

As for the steering tube itself. Quite frankly I've never seen a steering tube fail other than the points of threading or contact - so, yes, as FE says , it's good to apply some extra grease there - and it does / can act as a somewhat environmental 'seal'.



......that is the question.

This weekend I'll hopefully be building up a new bike.
I think I'll be able to manage most of the jobs,however....
The only query I have is do I have to grease the steerer tube or not?
Both the frame and forks are steel and I'm installing them into a Chris King headset.
Thanks in advance.
 

Forsbrook

Maximum Pace
Feb 13, 2008
399
64
48
Katsushika-ku
#7
Boeshield. If the frame is fresh, I'd give it a good spray. If you can't get Boeshield, then use Waxoyl (you're in UK, right? ) , if not that, then CRC makes a similar rust preventative. These spray on, foam a bit, actually embed into the steel surface then semi-dry to a slightly waxy film. You can spray this into all the tubes and anywhere there is bare steel. Framebuilders will generally pre-treat a frame, but, hey this is cheap insurance in case they didn't.

If you have the CK's with the stainless steel bearings, nothing is really required, though you might apply a little teflon based grease to simply reduce the inter-metal adhesion. The bearings themselves are already sealed and no further grease is required. I prefer the FinishLine Extreme Fluoro as it also prevents galling when you press the bearing cups into the headtube (if you're using a pressfit style). This stuff is great for the BB cartdridges as well - and it's also quite good for lubricating ceramic bearings (the balls themselves). Some mechanics prefer to use Locktite Bearing Mount (like 640) - as it provides extra adhesion without corrosion - good for BB30's more so, IMO.

Bear in mind - anytime you have dissimilar metals in contact with each other, you will have some added corrosion / adhesion issues. If you can isolate these parts, somewhat, with a bonding agent, insulation or lubricant, then that corrosion effect will be reduced. This goes for carbon-to-metal contact as well.

As for the steering tube itself. Quite frankly I've never seen a steering tube fail other than the points of threading or contact - so, yes, as FE says , it's good to apply some extra grease there - and it does / can act as a somewhat environmental 'seal'.
Thanks very much for your very comprehensive reply.
I am in east Tokyo so I will use CRC rust proof spray on it.
I wasn't sure if I was meant to put it in bare or not but thanks to you and FE I think I'all be OK.
 
Jun 9, 2011
241
1
36
tokyo
#8
Bear in mind - anytime you have dissimilar metals in contact with each other, you will have some added corrosion / adhesion issues.
not exactly related to the original question, but for places where you have dissimilar metals threaded together, especially titanium bolts going in to aluminum, use anti seize. regular teflon-based grease it's terrible but anti seize usually wears longer, specifically prevents galling, and often grips better at lower torque. silver anti seize is usually safest for bike parts, but check for compatibility with whatever metals you're using.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#9
Yes indeed. There are special Ti compatible Anti-sieze compounds. Actually S&S did alot of tests on this and decided that the high-fluoro compounds were the best. The Dupont stuff went off market for quite awhile, but now Finishline offers a similar (S&S Approved) prdt. Code named 'Hi-Fluoro' by the way and comes in a small syringe. Slightly off topic - this is also excellent lubricant for ceramic ball bearings.


not exactly related to the original question, but for places where you have dissimilar metals threaded together, especially titanium bolts going in to aluminum, use anti seize. regular teflon-based grease it's terrible but anti seize usually wears longer, specifically prevents galling, and often grips better at lower torque. silver anti seize is usually safest for bike parts, but check for compatibility with whatever metals you're using.