Tire/tyre boots

jdd

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Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
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Kanazawa
#1
In the adjacent thread on what you carry along, Joe and FE have mentioned tire boots, and I'd like to explore this specific item a little more.

Personally, I carry and would use the largest sized patch that comes in a typical patch-kit, probably about 3.5cm by 2.5cm, and would then glue this to the inside of the tire over the cut in the same way I'd patch a tube (done recently).

Advantages of this would seem to be that it would then not slip out of place (either initially or during a later repair), and depending on the size/type of tire cut, could even be more or less permanent.

Something I'm less certain about is the strength of a patch-kit patch vs what Joe mentioned--a suitably sized piece of old inner tube. (which I've also used)

The patch might be a little thinner (-), but may be a denser and less stretchy than a chunk of old inner tube (+). After all, tires are designed to inflate and not stretch in the way that tubes are. Plus it'd be glued to the tire. A big cut and maybe using a tube as a boot would still balloon out?

Obviously, a chunk of heavier old tube would be better than using something ultralight, but that's not really my question. (and I'm kind of rambling on this)

***

So Joe carries a chunk of old tube, FE uses some unspecified tire boot, I've used (and am prepared to use) a big glue-able patch.

What suggestions/comments can anyone offer on this?

Just tyring to be prepared...!
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#2
I've used a two dollar bill in the past, worked well enough. I carry a piece of that thick aluminum foil tape that is used for duct work, not duct tape, but the thick foil tape, it is about 4cm wide and I carry a piece about 30cm long. I've used a piece of this to great effect on a sliced sidewall. The foil tape is also very useful for a variety of other repairs.
 

joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#3
The patch might be a little thinner (-), but may be a denser and less stretchy than a chunk of old inner tube (+). After all, tires are designed to inflate and not stretch in the way that tubes are. Plus it'd be glued to the tire. A big cut and maybe using a tube as a boot would still balloon out?
When Mark (msen) and I worked on his cut tyre during the Ome temple loop we fixed my inner tube boot in place using his small patches from the puncture kit, so there was no way it could slip.

Unlike the inner tube the tube boot will not be stretched from within by air pressure, so it probably offers more resistance to ballooning than the tube itself. Anyway, it was OK with Mark's almost 1 cm tyre cut.

I usually also try to also carry some electrical tape, though I have not been very good about it recently, since I started avoiding the back pack whenever possible. One neat idea is to have short strips of it wrapped around the tyre levers or stick them to frame tubes, so you can just peel them off and stick them wherever needed, without having to worry about scissors or knives. I have applied electrical tape to the outside of a cut tyre before, as an extra protection layer. The tape actually stayed on for weeks before it came off.
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
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tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#4
As you aptly noticed, JD, tires are made not to stretch , so if you slice the sidewall then you compromise the bias ply cords and the tire would expand outward rather than contract inward (as it's designed to). So - best kind of boot is something that will not stretch at all and covers enough surface area to provde support over the cut region. Hence, why the stiff, woven paper (currency)is often used. The foiltape is another great idea - as it is inflexible and has abilty to cover a large area - the addition of the adhesive also makes it attractive for this purpose. Not to mention, one could probably use this to repair just about anything on the bike.

I've used alot of stuff over the years for boots - mainly junk I picked up along the road. Like plastic bottles, cardboard, soda cans, etc. again - just about anything that is not stretchy and can bolster the torn area will work.
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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Yokohama
#5
Actually the best tire boot is a 1,000 JPY note! Its a fabric and very thin but tough and is pretty hard to tear - ultra light weight and thin so doesn't mess with the dyanamics of the wheel.

I do beleive I told this trick to Fumiki who used it to great effect on a ride with Yamabushi.

As regards to actual tire boots. Most have a sticky back that is applied to the tire wall so it doesn't slip - its a tacky glue so as the tire expands with the tube it remains in place but doesn't stretch.

Using a puncture patch isn't a good idea for a long term solution as it will balloon out, however some boots are designed to remain in the tire once appllied, normally to the rolling surface. If it is to the side wall your tire is a gonna and you need to replace it immediately as the wall will continue to come apart.

As Tim mentioned in an emergency you can use all manner of stuff you find on the side of the road, leaves are the ultimate solution in a jam especailly the big cheese plant style ones that are in abundance here in Japan as they are pretty thick.

I actually stuffed a tire wwith grass once in the UK after I completely destroyed the inner and had a nasty gash that couldn't be repaired.