Race time trial japan stage 6 final

luka

Maximum Pace
Jan 13, 2015
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#2
I don't think I've got any alerts or notifications nor nothing that you tagged me here. Strange... It's only because I was waiting for a report that I noticed it.
 
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andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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Niigata
#4
When I fell for the first time, I thought "lucky it wasn't in the race", so I was surprised to come off two times during the race when I wasn't really pushing it.

The challenge 100 and 200km races started after the TT. But there were so many crashes that they got called off.

I was lucky I came down on my own and not in a group...

Andy
 
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leicaman

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Sep 20, 2012
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Asakadai, Saitama
#5
Great read and an even better result. Very nice to see you being such a good sport by giving the others a chance to catch up in the overall. I’m sure you planned all those crashes ;)
 
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andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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#6
Great read and an even better result. Very nice to see you being such a good sport by giving the others a chance to catch up in the overall. I’m sure you planned all those crashes ;)
In hindsight, I could have done it faster sans crashing on my road bike!

Then I could have got up early this morning and climbed Mount Fuji.

Instead I had a sleepless night and have a day at Fuji Q in front of me.😅

I smell a sicky coming on for tomorrow!

Andy
 
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wexford

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Jul 3, 2012
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Tokyo
#8
Nice footage. I've driven Fuji in the wet and almost lost my car on the same same corner you went down on in that video. The whole circuit looked slippery. Well done on keeping it all together over the series and in particular in this very challenging final event. Been an awesome read. What kind of times do the guys on the road bikes end up doing?
 

andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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#9
Nice footage. I've driven Fuji in the wet and almost lost my car on the same same corner you went down on in that video. The whole circuit looked slippery. Well done on keeping it all together over the series and in particular in this very challenging final event. Been an awesome read. What kind of times do the guys on the road bikes end up doing?
Cheers, I just looked at the data (will look at it more) and it seems I hit the deck at 59 kph and took almost 90s to get up and going again.

Yes the course was way too dangerous.

However, in hindsight, I've been a bit too bravado, I just turn up with a disc and a super deep front with slick 22mm tyres on them.

Really I should take a few options to deal with unexpected conditions. But you now how it is when you have kids in tow!

Also a big guy on a small bike is always going to be tricky!

On a TT bike, the usual average speed is 44, 45kph. On a road bike, 41,42 kph. But obviously this depends on course and conditions.

Glad you like the read!

Andy
 
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baribari

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May 28, 2010
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#10
It's a BAD idea to run road bikes on a wet auto racing track unless it has been very recently paved, since the pavement (especially in the corners) is coated in rubber laid down by race tires. This improves grip in the dry, but makes them very slick in the wet.

Regular roads don't generally have people turning corners at 100+ mph on racing tires, so tire rubber doesn't collect on them nearly as much.
 
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andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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#12
It's a BAD idea to run road bikes on a wet auto racing track unless it has been very recently paved, since the pavement (especially in the corners) is coated in rubber laid down by race tires. This improves grip in the dry, but makes them very slick in the wet.

Regular roads don't generally have people turning corners at 100+ mph on racing tires, so tire rubber doesn't collect on them nearly as much.
Definitely, the only upside is the damage isn't quite as bad!

Maybe!

Andy
 

andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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#14
I didn't escape unhurt, lots of skin came off!

But yeah on a winding mountain descent, in traffic or even a mass start cycling event, coming off at that speed would likely have worse consequences.

Thanks for reading the reports. The series was quite an adventure. And entering each stage with the kids was special.

They really enjoy riding the track so we may focus on that next year.

Happy riding!

Andy
 
Likes: Kangaeroo
Sep 13, 2010
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Kochi
#16
Seeing as I'm here, very well done Andy on winning the series. Sorry to watch you crash, but at least it only cost you some skin and not the series. I think the less said about Fujita san's riding the better - straight down as soon as he hits the front brake, but not really surprising given he's on a TT bike with more weight on the front wheel, it's raining and he's turning at the time.

As for front wheels, the guy who holds the bike record for Kona (Cameron Wurf) set it last year with a 40mm front wheel; his argument being that a shallower front wheel was easier to handle and that made it faster overall. The disk in the back is fine, as unless it's gusty and you could get picked up by the wind, being behind the steering axis, the disk adds stability.
 
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Apr 8, 2008
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#17
Seeing as I'm here, very well done Andy on winning the series. Sorry to watch you crash, but at least it only cost you some skin and not the series. I think the less said about Fujita san's riding the better - straight down as soon as he hits the front brake, but not really surprising given he's on a TT bike with more weight on the front wheel, it's raining and he's turning at the time.

As for front wheels, the guy who holds the bike record for Kona (Cameron Wurf) set it last year with a 40mm front wheel; his argument being that a shallower front wheel was easier to handle and that made it faster overall. The disk in the back is fine, as unless it's gusty and you could get picked up by the wind, being behind the steering axis, the disk adds stability.
Long time no speak!

I went down on the same corner as Fujita san in the warm up. As did winner Kouno san.

A car racing circuit with rubber and oil residues in heavy rain is a recipe for disaster. I've slipped on ice before and it was a similar sensation.

My front is super deep and not particularly good for crosswinds (!) or a circuit with climbs like that.

I was talking to Enosan at the bike shop just yesterday about that and I'm keeping an eye out for a front baton wheel. His theory is that they cut through the air and that Corima baton wheels are made using the same company/technology as Apache helicopter blades. Sometimes I wonder if he's pulling my leg!

Anyway, I definitely need more options!

I've signed up for one last TT, a 60km 2UP TT at the Suzuka F1 circuit, a little different to the standard 10km ITT, so I'm motivated for one last push.

Anyway, I hope all's well with you. Wish I was in Tokyo to help you put a deposit down!

Andy
 
Sep 13, 2010
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Kochi
#19
Indeed, long time. Yes, all is well down here, thanks - I don't know what happened to the other place, as never received any correspondence about it.

For sure, the circuit was dangerous, but he didn't help himself, as you can clearly see him grab the front brake and slam, straight down.

I don't know about the Corima wheels, but the continued use of the HED tri spoke, makes you think there must be something about that type of design in terms of handling, as well as the aero performance. I can't comment on whether use for a helicopter has any crossover to use on a bicycle, unless of course, you really want to be 'flying' around the track..oh dear! On that subject, these are claimed to be the fastest wheels at the moment, but there is debate about what would happen if you hit a pothole with the two spokes in a horizontal position. Pro have recently released a tri spoke wheel - I think HED's patent expired - and there is a cheaper version on Planet X's site - maybe you can find reviews on the timetrialling forum.

Other than the first time I used them, I've never had a problem with my Swiss Side Hadron's, and i don't remotely worry about them when it's windy.

The one thing i would watch for is that clincher's (with latex inners) are the fastest set-up, but in a TT, if you get a puncture you are buggered, but a tubular would allow an option of finishing the race.

Thanks for the offer. They had the bike advertised a month ago, and i rang them up, but back then, it would have cost a trip to tokyo, plus they quoted 3 man (!!! - unless i misheard them) to ship it down here afterwards, and it wasn't worth it. (imagine going into a shop, buying something, and then walking out with it - what a quaint notion! Can't i just put it in a rinko bag?) Now, with the option of my friend paying for it and then me picking up later, it would work out fine. If i can't find anyone, then at least it will take the bike off the market for a week, and then it will only be a short while before my friend will be there. If Jetstar was operating (doesn't start till December) I would do it myself, but otherwise it is hard to justify the added time/expense.
 
Likes: andywood
Apr 8, 2008
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#20
Indeed, long time. Yes, all is well down here, thanks - I don't know what happened to the other place, as never received any correspondence about it.

For sure, the circuit was dangerous, but he didn't help himself, as you can clearly see him grab the front brake and slam, straight down.

I don't know about the Corima wheels, but the continued use of the HED tri spoke, makes you think there must be something about that type of design in terms of handling, as well as the aero performance. I can't comment on whether use for a helicopter has any crossover to use on a bicycle, unless of course, you really want to be 'flying' around the track..oh dear! On that subject, these are claimed to be the fastest wheels at the moment, but there is debate about what would happen if you hit a pothole with the two spokes in a horizontal position. Pro have recently released a tri spoke wheel - I think HED's patent expired - and there is a cheaper version on Planet X's site - maybe you can find reviews on the timetrialling forum.

Other than the first time I used them, I've never had a problem with my Swiss Side Hadron's, and i don't remotely worry about them when it's windy.

The one thing i would watch for is that clincher's (with latex inners) are the fastest set-up, but in a TT, if you get a puncture you are buggered, but a tubular would allow an option of finishing the race.

Thanks for the offer. They had the bike advertised a month ago, and i rang them up, but back then, it would have cost a trip to tokyo, plus they quoted 3 man (!!! - unless i misheard them) to ship it down here afterwards, and it wasn't worth it. (imagine going into a shop, buying something, and then walking out with it - what a quaint notion! Can't i just put it in a rinko bag?) Now, with the option of my friend paying for it and then me picking up later, it would work out fine. If i can't find anyone, then at least it will take the bike off the market for a week, and then it will only be a short while before my friend will be there. If Jetstar was operating (doesn't start till December) I would do it myself, but otherwise it is hard to justify the added time/expense.
When I crashed on that corner I was half way around the corner and fell on my left side, so not sure what happened...

I'd be a bit scared to use 2 spokes (Enosan recommends 3 or 4).

But the Planet X's Selcof looks like a great deal. About 44000 JPY. And light too.

If you know any other good links please tell me.

Cheers!

Andy
 
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