Race The Training Thread

baribari

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Check your pads frequently and often!

I recently noticed my car's front pads are basically down to the last mm or so, and the rotors are basically worn out... This will probably end up costing me my coronacheck.
 

andywood

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Check your pads frequently and often!

I recently noticed my car's front pads are basically down to the last mm or so, and the rotors are basically worn out... This will probably end up costing me my coronacheck.
Yep, new pads front and rear last week. Basically wore them out in one ride. 3500m descending in the rain.

Andy
 

leicaman

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Yep, new pads front and rear last week. Basically wore them out in one ride. 3500m descending in the rain.

Andy
Damn, sounds like there is something wrong with your brakes. 3500m of wet descent shouldn’t seem them off. I used to race downhill so I would go to Fujimi panorama and practice all weekend, rain or shin. On rainy weekends I would be probably doing 12 runs each day. Not sure how much elevation drop there is but I’m guessing over 500m so around 12,000m of drop, if not more. My pads would last way way longer than a week even in the worst conditions. Very strange.
 

andywood

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Damn, sounds like there is something wrong with your brakes. 3500m of wet descent shouldn’t seem them off. I used to race downhill so I would go to Fujimi panorama and practice all weekend, rain or shin. On rainy weekends I would be probably doing 12 runs each day. Not sure how much elevation drop there is but I’m guessing over 500m so around 12,000m of drop, if not more. My pads would last way way longer than a week even in the worst conditions. Very strange.
Yeah mate, I dunno. It's a work in progress. Using a cheap front brake at the moment as the front is being repaired. So stopping power is not the best. And after a crash right at the start of today's ride I was anchoring it all the way.

Hydraulic is the way to go but I'm wondering whether to keep flogging money in bits and pieces like this or just buy another bike already nicely set up. Maybe even a MTB with full suspension.

That'll eat into the beer budget!

Andy
 

OreoCookie

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That’s definitely way too quick, pads shouldn’t wear nowhere near that rate. The only instance where I can remember such fast wear is when you are going through mud and mud clogs the space between your pads and discs. That acts like sand paper and can literally sand off your pads and worse, your rotors.

Regarding saving vs. investing: if memory serves, you are riding an older Colnago CX bike that was converted to disc brakes, correct? If that’s the case, I’d definitely save up for a new bike.
 
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andywood

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That’s definitely way too quick, pads shouldn’t wear nowhere near that rate. The only instance where I can remember such fast wear is when you are going through mud and mud clogs the space between your pads and discs. That acts like sand paper and can literally sand off your pads and worse, your rotors.

Regarding saving vs. investing: if memory serves, you are riding an older Colnago CX bike that was converted to disc brakes, correct? If that’s the case, I’d definitely save up for a new bike.
Cheers, yeah thinking about what to do. This bike is good for CX so I could just go for a MTB for more extreme riding.

Will give it a think!

Andy
 
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baribari

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I just walked into a bike shop the other day and found a brand new Merida Big Nine Limited looking real fine... not too much to buy, but too much to think about commuting on.

The new CAADX with the Taiwanese 1X groupset is looking nice, as well. Its just cheap enough to commute on and comes with removable fender mounts, so it would be a perfect rain and adventure bike...

Decisions, decisions...
 
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OreoCookie

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@andywood
Depending on what kind of riding you are doing, a hardtail may also be an option. It is true that with an unlimited budget, fullys are the way to go these days, they are just this good. The increase in traction more than makes up for the additional weight and slight loss in pedaling efficiency. But if your budget is limited, a good hard tail may still be an option, especially if you are more interested in XC marathon races and the like.

@baribari
A CAADX is great. Does the bike have hydraulic disc brakes?
 
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baribari

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@andywood
Depending on what kind of riding you are doing, a hardtail may also be an option. It is true that with an unlimited budget, fullys are the way to go these days, they are just this good. The increase in traction more than makes up for the additional weight and slight loss in pedaling efficiency. But if your budget is limited, a good hard tail may still be an option, especially if you are more interested in XC marathon races and the like.

@baribari
A CAADX is great. Does the bike have hydraulic disc brakes?
No, but the bike is only 120,000 yen, so asking for hydraulic brakes is.... optimistic.
 

OreoCookie

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No, but the bike is only 120,000 yen, so asking for hydraulic brakes is.... optimistic.
You hadn't mentioned the price. But for that price you might still want to pick it up. The frame is a good design and can be updated with a better groupset later if necessary.
 

OreoCookie

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Depending on what kind of riding you are doing, a hardtail may also be an option. It is true that with an unlimited budget, fullys are the way to go these days, they are just this good. The increase in traction more than makes up for the additional weight and slight loss in pedaling efficiency. But if your budget is limited, a good hard tail may still be an option, especially if you are more interested in XC marathon races and the like.
 
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andywood

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Looking back through my records, those brake pads did almost 2 weeks, 800km and 20,000m vertical.

IMG_20200518_143839.jpg

IMG_20200518_143913.jpg

The front pads were cheap ones in this temporary mechanical front brake.

Once the oil drum front brake comes back, I will test it against my mate's full hydraulic set up.

This is us comparing our current set ups. The saddle is too high for him to pedal, but you can see him taking good lines.


I was certainly impressed by the improved stopping power on his bike.

If it's much better than my set up with drum brakes front and rear, then I may think about a hydraulic set up. 105 seems to retail for about 50,000 yen for example.

Then there is the MTB! Definitely want one at some point. I think I'd like to go all in. Maybe keep my eyes open for something second hand.

Anyway thanks for the advice and input!

Andy
 
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OreoCookie

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If it's much better than my set up with drum brakes front and rear, then I may think about a hydraulic set up. 105 seems to retail for about 50,000 yen for example.
I have 105-level hydraulics on my road bike, they work very well. Although I have the non-IceTech rotors on my road bike, and they are not as good as my IceTech XTR rotors on my mountain bike. Given how much you ascend — and thus, descend — I'd recommend going for 160 mm front and rear. Although if you are gravel riding, perhaps the GRX shifters would also be an option for you. I haven't handled them myself, but AFAIK they are fully compatible (as long as you get the 11-speed mechanical version).
Then there is the MTB! Definitely want one at some point. I think I'd like to go all in. Maybe keep my eyes open for something second hand.
I heard @bloaker is ready to sell another bike at one point this year ;)
 
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andywood

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I have 105-level hydraulics on my road bike, they work very well. Although I have the non-IceTech rotors on my road bike, and they are not as good as my IceTech XTR rotors on my mountain bike. Given how much you ascend — and thus, descend — I'd recommend going for 160 mm front and rear. Although if you are gravel riding, perhaps the GRX shifters would also be an option for you. I haven't handled them myself, but AFAIK they are fully compatible (as long as you get the 11-speed mechanical version).

I heard @bloaker is ready to sell another bike at one point this year ;)
This is all new to me, as you can probably guess!

Currently I have:


105 10 speed mechanical brifters
growtac brake cables
juin tech oil drum brakes
shimano 160 ice rotors
ultegra derrailleur modified with a long gauge to accomodate an 11/34 cassette

If I go the hydraulic way I will research the difference between 105 and GRX.

Thanks for the input.

Andy
 

OreoCookie

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shimano 160 ice rotors
Nice.
ultegra derrailleur modified with a long gauge to accomodate an 11/34 cassette
FYI, if you need more range, SRAM's 11-36 cassette should still fit. And perhaps also Shimano's 11-40 cassette.
If I go the hydraulic way I will research the difference between 105 and GRX.
There is also a Tiagra-level 10-speed GRX shifter, and I reckon (although I have not checked!) that this is compatible with all 10-speed Shimano rear derailleurs.
 
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andywood

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Nice.

FYI, if you need more range, SRAM's 11-36 cassette should still fit. And perhaps also Shimano's 11-40 cassette.

There is also a Tiagra-level 10-speed GRX shifter, and I reckon (although I have not checked!) that this is compatible with all 10-speed Shimano rear derailleurs.
The guage only goes up to 34 according to the Shimano guidelines.

Chain ring is double 50/34 so probably enough gearing for what I need.

Will look into the different grades of GRX too.

Cheers, Andy
 

Half-Fast Mike

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If I go the hydraulic way I will research the difference between 105 and GRX.
My Niner came with GRX 800 (Ultegra-level) drivetrain. It's all really nice. Braking is so sweet.

My only gripes:
  • Shipping straight from 'murica, the hydraulic brakes were wired-up (cabled-up?) the wrong way round for my preference.
  • Have to loosen the RD to take out the rear wheel.
  • I'm feeling the need for (even) lower gearing than the 11-34 stock cassette, however. So I'll need a mountain bike cassette and the longer derailleur cage RD-RX812.
 

luka

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@Half-Fast Mike what do you mean you need to loosen the RD to take the rear wheel off? I was a bit confused at first too, but all it takes is to switch off the clutch mechanism and it goes out much more smoothly (I can get it out even with the clutch on, and no loosening, but it can be a bit too much). also, if your front small ring is 30 or 31, as GRX are, where would you really need anything lower than 30-34? or maybe you have oneby?