What's new

Help The Helpful Thread

The biggest "criticism" (which could be just my ignorance) is that I don't see what makes them special (apart from the color).
The colour says Bianchi and Bianchi says "Italian" which still counts for something in cycling tradition (along with France and Belgium).

With a Bianchi I don't expect the bike to be special but at least competent.
 
Yeah and to be clear I'm not hung up on tradition. I think Bianchi is cool but if I had more money I'd be going for a Canyon. But for budget and compared to the other bikes I've seen I just like it's vibe more and components at that price range seem to be comparable imo. But I also know nothing so tell me if I'm wrong haha!
 
Thanks for all the advice. I have had a look at some Canondales and at the entry level sub ¥200,000 I like the look of the Bianchi most and it seems to have a decent set of components. When I step up the budget, I'm in love with the Canyon Edurace and the Canondale Synapse personally, but I just don't think it's smart to spend that coin when I'm just getting into the hobby (although I really want to haha)

But new job and less pay means this is going to be a purchase for next year. I'm already wishing I had a road bike instead of the cross bike for longer rides, but at least I have something to hit the roads with for now!!
Wait for the sale season, or just wait until January when the new models come out and the older ones go down in price.
 
When rain is likely then I carry or wear rain pants (unless it's summer and so hot that you you either get wet from rain or from sweat, doesn't matter). I have a pair from Workman Plus that cost me 1,900 yen and it does the job. I have a small and light string backpack that I use to carry the rain gear when not in use.

I never ever wear jeans on a bike. For a start, cotton is not a good choice for when you might sweat. Technical fibers such as polyester are much quicker drying and will be much more comfortable year round. At most I'll wear a cotton-polyester blend, never pure cotton!
Thanks for the workman idea, that's what I think I need if they have long ones for tall people.

The jeans are actually a cycling specific Jean from Portland, but not so good in the rain. Sweat wise pretty good so far but as we get hotter will be shorts.
 
what happens if you need chains more than 116 links long? I don't think I can readily find any for sale...

the new stand up bike has 48T in the front, and 11-34 in the back. I don't have exact measurements yet on the chainstay length or center to rear for example, but overall wheelbase is fully 15cm longer than my Lynskey. that bike has 46-34, and I think I only needed to remove one or two links when installing the 116 link chain. I'm also thinking of getting 11-46 in the back. so it's almost certain 116 links won't be enough...

do I have to buy two chains and connect it in two places?
 
do I have to buy two chains and connect it in two places?
Yes.

♪ Oppa tandem style

giphy.gif

But you will have plenty of spare for next time.

Also, don't worry about master links being the weakest link. They're fine.

 
thanks @Half-Fast Mike ! indeed, tandems (or even recumbents etc) need a loooot of chain. so that's how they do it... OK got it now. I think one of the first upgrades , no definitely the first upgrade, on the new bike will be the 10 speed 4100 deore drivetrain, because 8 speed 11-34 will most probably not be enough. should be able to get it all for about 15,000 yen or so
 
the new stand up bike has 48T in the front, and 11-34 in the back. I don't have exact measurements yet on the chainstay length or center to rear for example, but overall wheelbase is fully 15cm longer than my Lynskey. that bike has 46-34, and I think I only needed to remove one or two links when installing the 116 link chain. I'm also thinking of getting 11-46 in the back. so it's almost certain 116 links won't be enough...
Just a stupid question: what gearing do you need on such a bike? 48:11 feels a bit overgeared, but I don't know.
(With a smaller chain ring you might also need a shorter chain.)
 
things are pretty much set on the front end, and I don't want (and cannot easily and cheaply) change anything there. proprietary stuff, 150mm cranks etc. so I'm most probably changing because 1) 8 gears only between 11 to 34 would mean too big jumps between gears and 2) more importantly, 48-34 is not low enough. I'm getting 10 speed because that's the most one can get without changing the rear wheel or the hub etc.

later on, when I see what's the deal with the front end of the drivetrain, if I can just swap out the chainring I'll consider it. if it means I need a new BB and cranks as well just to do it... it may or may not happen. but for sure 48-11 is probably not gonna see much action
 
turns out 48-11 is not such an overkill considering how drastically the cadence drops when standing up

1651275519856.png
 
Please let me know if everyone feels this needs its own thread. I couldn't find anything recent.

Where do people recommend road bike hire in Tokyo? Tourists aren't back yet, but friends are telling me their business trips are happening from Septembe, October & asking me about bikes.

My first recommendation was if a Rapha member they have Canyon high end bikes, from Sept I think they are OPEN high spec bikes, just ¥5500/day, but only a max of 3 days. The other place that pops up is this one:

https://cycletrip.jp/ja/bike-list.html?c=2

Would need to be easy to access in fairly central Tokyo or with hotel delivery, not a trip out to Kanazawa or somewhere to collect.
 
...
https://cycletrip.jp/ja/bike-list.html?c=2

Would need to be easy to access in fairly central Tokyo or with hotel delivery, not a trip out to Kanazawa or somewhere to collect.
Seems like that is in tokyo?

 
thanks @Half-Fast Mike ! indeed, tandems (or even recumbents etc) need a loooot of chain. so that's how they do it... OK got it now. I think one of the first upgrades , no definitely the first upgrade, on the new bike will be the 10 speed 4100 deore drivetrain, because 8 speed 11-34 will most probably not be enough. should be able to get it all for about 15,000 yen or so
Yes, that's how I did it with my recumbent. Joined two chains.
 
Seems like that is in tokyo?

Looks good, just wondering if anyone has used this, and/or have other city road bike rental options that aren't a huge pain in the arse.
 
Looks good, just wondering if anyone has used this, and/or have other city road bike rental options that aren't a huge pain in the arse.
It was probably a typo--in your post above it said Kanazawa (where I am), and you probably meant Kanagawa...

There was a fellow there in tokyo--Tim, who ran a shop, built wheels, designed frames that he had built in china--who was also renting bikes. But he may have closed down the rental part with corona, I'm not sure. @Half-Fast Mike Would you know?
 
There was a fellow there in tokyo--Tim, who ran a shop, built wheels, designed frames that he had built in china--who was also renting bikes. But he may have closed down the rental part with corona, I'm not sure. @Half-Fast Mike Would you know?
Tim Smith t/a GS Astuto is now based in Annaka, Gunma. Ramping the business back up, in diverse ways, but not the service @TheAussieinJapan is looking for.

Specialized don't do rentals but I gather that you can borrow their test bikes for a fee. Like, ¥6,000 a day for S-Works.
 
The crucial point: If you have a slow leak, check that the valve stem (core) is in tight.

Had a recent slow leak, wheel off and tube out (at which time I noticed the stem was not in tight), bucket of water, patiently looked and looked and couldn't find anything--went over the tube twice to make sure.

Used needle-nose pliers to make sure the stem was tight when putting things back. Now living happily ever after...
 
The crucial point: If you have a slow leak, check that the valve stem (core) is in tight.

Had a recent slow leak, wheel off and tube out (at which time I noticed the stem was not in tight), bucket of water, patiently looked and looked and couldn't find anything--went over the tube twice to make sure.

Used needle-nose pliers to make sure the stem was tight when putting things back. Now living happily ever after...
In the words of the Beastie Boys, I'll snatch you up with a needle nose pliers ...
 
What bicycle insurance are you guys joining? Before I left I joined 7eleven, but I'm not sure, if that's still a good deal. Of course I'll do my own research. But why not benefitting from shared knowledge on this forum;)
 
What bicycle insurance are you guys joining? Before I left I joined 7eleven, but I'm not sure, if that's still a good deal. Of course I'll do my own research. But why not benefitting from shared knowledge on this forum;)
Most (all) cell phone companies offer bike insurance. I am paying 500ish ¥/month to cover myself and my spouse.
 
Back
Top Bottom