Stabilisers at the ready !!

Spud

Warming-Up
Mar 6, 2008
4
0
0
Tokyo - Komai machi
#1
Hello Everyone,

Chazzer introduced me to the site and after reading the a lot of the posts I see a lot of you guys are road racers, I on the other hand cannot be classed in that section or any other for that matter...lol, I have just purchased a full suspension Trek Top Fuel 7 MTB.

If I explain which might help you understand where I'm coming from, I haven't been on a bike (pedal type) since I was 14 yrs old !!

Last year a work colleague asked me whilst at the top of a 40 meter climbing pyramid if I would be interested in teaming up with him for an Action Asia Challenge..!? Well during my adrenalin rush is said sure no problem !!! (big mistake) since then I have quit smoking, and started training everyday !!!

Now as part of the Action Asia Challenge there are certain disciplines that must be done to finish the race, which are: Running, Swimming, Sea Kayaking, Rock Climbing, Abseiling, Rock Scrambling, Orienteering, some mental tests as well, but the one that has drawn me to this great website is Mountain / Trail riding !! Now I have purchased the bike (the easiest part although the wife wouldn't agree) and I have started riding along the Tama river (5 mins from my front door, pop in for a coffee, chat or even just to use the head!)

Now riding up and down the Tama river is ok, but what I really need a someone who can show me how to ride this bike off road on real trails etc, this is why I'm here, so if there are any Mountain bikers out there that are willing to take a real newbie under their wing and impart their wisdom and time I would be extremely grateful and also have some laughs along the way.

I'm looking forward to chatting with you all and also hopefully meeting up as well.

Regards
Spud
 

Spud

Warming-Up
Mar 6, 2008
4
0
0
Tokyo - Komai machi
#3
My suggestion would be to learn by doing. I remember Alan (an accomplished mountain biker) used to hone his skills at Fujimi Panorama MTB - take a look at his original post for an explanation, details and even a video.

https://tokyocycle.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=485

Cheers,

Philip
Thank you Philip, it is indeed a good thread I might not be at that level yet but I have to start somewhere right ..!!!? :eek:uch:

Spud
 

Philip

Speeding Up
Feb 15, 2007
765
7
38
Setagaya
#4
Some thoughts . . .

In my experience Spud, going up is much harder than coming down :)

You will need to do specific training for the course you are riding in the race. I assume speed is less of an issue given the number of events. Therefore you need only endurance (how many km will you ride?), strength (what is the elevation gain?) and mtb skills (how technical is the course?) to complete the bike section.

If the bike challenge is moderate you may do better to focus all your limited training time entirely on endurance training - longer bike rides and runs to improve your overall fitness to survive the demands of the entire event.

However, if the bike challenge is reasonably technical and hilly it would be wise to learn bike skills and get in some hill training so you learn to suffer.

Keep smiling :D It would be no fun if it was not a challenge.

Philip
 

Spud

Warming-Up
Mar 6, 2008
4
0
0
Tokyo - Komai machi
#5
In my experience Spud, going up is much harder than coming down :)

You will need to do specific training for the course you are riding in the race. I assume speed is less of an issue given the number of events. Therefore you need only endurance (how many km will you ride?), strength (what is the elevation gain?) and mtb skills (how technical is the course?) to complete the bike section.

If the bike challenge is moderate you may do better to focus all your limited training time entirely on endurance training - longer bike rides and runs to improve your overall fitness to survive the demands of the entire event.

However, if the bike challenge is reasonably technical and hilly it would be wise to learn bike skills and get in some hill training so you learn to suffer.

Keep smiling :D It would be no fun if it was not a challenge.

Philip
Thanks Philip

I used to be a Physical Training Instructor so the Endurance and running portion is not an issue, but Riding is a totally different matter so I think what I should do is go up to the Hakone area do some rider training up there..what do you think?

Spud
 

AlanW

Maximum Pace
Jan 30, 2007
1,214
436
103
Tokyo
#6
Starting MTB in Japan

Hi,
For beginning mountainbiking, there is a good "training loop" in Sagamiko Picnic Land, to the West of Tokyo, at the East end of Sagamiko lake. Their website is http://www.picnicland.co.jp but you will need to speak/understand Japanese (or find someone who does) to get in and get to the MTB loops.
I used to ride a lot at Hinode but that is not a beginners' course by any means. There are some tracks at Ome that are suitable for learning in dry conditions. They are slippery and treacherous when they are wet though. They are incredible difficult to find. If you want I'll send you the GPS co-ordinates for the trailhead.

There is a bilingual MTB class run every so often in Japan. Have a look at http://www.sweetriders.com for the schedules. The course content looks good. Naomi-san and I tried to get to one of these while she was learning, but we kept getting rained-off :rain: and Naomi's skills passed what was taught in the courses.

Have fun....
AW​
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,669
483
103
Japan
#7
enter as many races as you have time and money for, join a local bike club and the locals will be able to point you in the right direction. traveling as a team helps lower costs a lot. Best way to get skills is practice at speed in events. This months Bicycle Club or Cycle Sports magazine should have a pull out event guide to help you plan things. choose the longest enduro events as they offer better bang for your buck. Along the Tama gawa look for the roughest way around any obstacle and each time you pass it hit it with more speed. Good luck.
 

Spud

Warming-Up
Mar 6, 2008
4
0
0
Tokyo - Komai machi
#8
Hi,
For beginning mountainbiking, there is a good "training loop" in Sagamiko Picnic Land, to the West of Tokyo, at the East end of Sagamiko lake. Their website is http://www.picnicland.co.jp but you will need to speak/understand Japanese (or find someone who does) to get in and get to the MTB loops.
I used to ride a lot at Hinode but that is not a beginners' course by any means. There are some tracks at Ome that are suitable for learning in dry conditions. They are slippery and treacherous when they are wet though. They are incredible difficult to find. If you want I'll send you the GPS co-ordinates for the trailhead.

There is a bilingual MTB class run every so often in Japan. Have a look at http://www.sweetriders.com for the schedules. The course content looks good. Naomi-san and I tried to get to one of these while she was learning, but we kept getting rained-off :rain: and Naomi's skills passed what was taught in the courses.

Have fun....
AW​
Alan Thank you very much for your advice and links they are a very good starting point and I'm sure I can see the ferris wheel for picnicland from my home so it doesn't look that far away...but you never really know in Japan :)

I will let you know how I get one with these trails and I will also look into getting on one of those courses.

Regards
Spud