SPD pedals and shoes - advice needed

scandiman

Warming-Up
Aug 12, 2010
96
0
0
Ota-ku
#1
Folks

I am changing to SPD from SPD-sl.

A lot of my cycling unfortunately comes down to dirty commuting and as for the rest I like to get off the bike and wander about beyond the conbini. I quite fancy the SPD-sl system but it is not always practical.

In short, I am looking for something which is easier to clip in and out of and, if possible, does not have too much of a negative impact on the power transfer. Something which is great both for my 17 k commute and century touring.

Does it exist?

So, any advice on the below pedals and shoes much appreciated (sorry, no hyperlinks, thread does no seem to get posted then).

Dual sided pedal, cheap cheap cheap:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-m520-pedals/

Dual sided, decent price:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-m540-pedals/

Best for touring?!:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-pd-a520-touring-pedals-1/

Sounds great but suited for my needs?:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-xt-m770-pedals/

Road SPD shoes :

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-rt31-spd-touring-shoes/

More walking orientated shoes:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-m077-spd-mtb-shoes/

Cheers!
/Frode
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
1,454
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#2
Until recently. I used M520 pedals on all my bikes and a combination of Specialized, Shimano and Keen shoes. 10,000 km a year. Never had any problems and liked the simplicity and reliability of the system.

I have two pairs of Specialized BG Sport MTB shoes. Easy to walk in. Inexpensive. Three independent Velcro fasteners; I don't like the clip/string/garotte arrangements on fancier shoes. For winter and bad weather I have two pairs of Shimano waterproof/bombproof shoes (one pair of MW80, one pair MW02). More expensive but for me well worth it on a February morning. And I have a pair of Keen sandals - these are too narrow for humans - my little toe sticks out between the webbing straps. WOFTAM.

At considerable expense I switched to TIME ATAC pedals in January. They have more area for power transfer and more float. However I have since developed a nagging pain in my knee joint. I don't know whether that's because of the change of pedal system or some other factor at play, but I didn't have it when I was using SPDs.

YMMV.
 

thomas

The Crank Engine
Nov 1, 2005
1,812
219
93
多摩区
#3
As a fellow commuter I use SPD pedals on all my bicycles. I do wear my bicycle shoes at work, even when (on rare occasion) in more formal attire. I like the SIDI range of MTB shoes

=> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?s=sidi+mtb

(black for office, silver/perl in situations of more casual nature). I guess the power transfer for commutes and touring is more than sufficient. Even my climbing bike features SPD pedals, as it is far easier to disengage on stupidly steep gradients (like in the upcoming Fuji Hill Climb).

I use the Shimano XT and XTR pedals.

=> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-xt-m770-pedals/
=> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-xtr-m980-xc-race-pedals/

It really boils down to how much you are willing to spend. Lots of useful info in this thread, by the way

=> https://tokyocycle.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=1982

... in particular Ludwig's post:

I'm wondering whether anyone with experience with both SPDs and any race-type systems could comment on what difference it makes when clipped in.

I get laughed at for racing in SPD pedals, but have never felt that I am making a compromise. But then I have never tried anything else.

I always pity everyone taking so long to clip in at lights and finding it hard to walk. SPDs are just as convenient as clip-less, and I have never had any issues with the engagement/power transmission.

A friend recently switched from SPD-SL to SPD and noticed only a big improvement in convenient, nothing else...
 
Dec 31, 2009
906
87
48
Matsumoto
#4
Just an Idea

Time makes a cleat called the Cafe cleat for there road pedals, branded as a road cleat that is walkable. It is not an spd. Not good for hiking but very good for walking on pavement. As far as weight of the pedal and width of the pedal platform they are great as well. If you think about how much your spinning your feet around and the weight difference between a light pedal shoe system and a heavy on it really is a big difference. If you are going SPD go for xt or xtr. I rode SPD for a very long time on my road bike but I just like the way a standard road pedal looks over the SPD, I also like the way the shoe looks and the overall weight of the shoe/pedal system being less. I definitly notice a difference in all aspects when I switch between the two ( I still keep my SPD pedals on my cross bike )
 

StuInTokyo

Maximum Pace
Dec 3, 2010
1,662
62
78
#5
I have the cheap >> Shimano SPD double stomps << on both of my bikes, and they will go on my Lrrb as well :D They are CHEAP, and they work fine, they weight 380g, the XT pedals weigh 352g is 28g really that big of a difference? I know the price is surely more, more than double.

The touring pedals you show are neat, but I had a pair and I hated having to flip the darn things over all the time to get locked in and I almost NEVER ride without my cycling shoes. that being said, I bought these >> M424 << to go on my Cannondale, as it will become my around town bike, and the M520 double stomps will go on the Lrrb.

For shoes, I really like the Shimano touring/MTB shoes, not the hardcore MTB shoes. These Shimano >> MT33 << shoes are great, but I have the Shimano >> MT42 << shoes, I like these better as the velcro strap I find very good. I know from experience that you should order one size up from what you usually wear, the Shimano shoes seem to fit a bit narrow. All of that being said, Timdesuyo bought a pair of the >> DHB T1 << shoes These look really good, Timdesuyo seems to really like them, and at half the price of the Shimano shoes, well they are a bargain. I am thinking of buying a pair just so I'd have two pairs of cycling shoes, as I wear mine almost all day most every day, hard on the shoes and the feet, especially when it gets to rainy season.

I certainly like the SPD system, I've been using them for years.

While I think of it, I have a pair of older Shimano SPD shoes, they are size 44 or 45, and they are just a big too small for me, if they fit, and you would like them, you can have them, I don't need them, they are perfectly OK just older, they are in good shape, but do not fit anymore. I guess as you get older your feet get bigger..... no really.... :eek:uch:
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#6
Time makes a cleat called the Cafe cleat for there road pedals, branded as a road cleat that is walkable. It is not an spd. Not good for hiking but very good for walking on pavement. As far as weight of the pedal and width of the pedal platform they are great as well. If you think about how much your spinning your feet around and the weight difference between a light pedal shoe system and a heavy on it really is a big difference. If you are going SPD go for xt or xtr. I rode SPD for a very long time on my road bike but I just like the way a standard road pedal looks over the SPD, I also like the way the shoe looks and the overall weight of the shoe/pedal system being less. I definitly notice a difference in all aspects when I switch between the two ( I still keep my SPD pedals on my cross bike )
Cafe cleats are not for walking in.. nor do I recomend them at all if you want to spend time off the bike.... TIME cleats are 100% racing cleats and wear down very very very quickly compared to Shimano or Look style cleat systems. I have both the RXS and iClick pedal systems by time and basically they consist of a ultra-lightweight polymer clear with rubberised coating to the edges which wears off within a month. Also they are BLOODY expensive compared to other pedal systems.

At the end of the day for cleat durability Look or Shimano pedals are the way to go. For ULTIMATE enduro then the Speedplay cleat is it... one solid peice of aluminium that takes years of abuse.

As for speed of cliping in and out..... well its all about experience. I can clip in and out of Time, Shimano, Look, Speed Play, Campy road bike pedal systems just as fast as I can off road pedal systems so really thats not a factor.

Power tranfer is not about the pedal as much as it is the shoe..... there are many types of road and off road shoes with solid soles (max power transfer) that don't flex or bend to sloppy shoes (max power loss) that feel just like regualr hiking or running shoes, you can even convert shoes to run on clipless pedals and I converted a pair of Airwalk "One" for street riding.
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
2,519
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Kanazawa
#8
I chose these for my tourer:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-a530-spd-single-sided-touring-pedals/

And apparently they're on clearance. The non-cleat side is broad and easy to use, lots of surface area. The cleat on the right pedal initially had some odd play in it when cleated in, very annoying at first. I tried various adjustments (but not the brute-force hammer approach) without much success. They were too heavy (expensive) to return, so I've tried to live with them as is, and have been okay with that.
 
Oct 15, 2010
669
10
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#9
Get the Shimano 520s - you will not be disappointed. I have some French shoes, and you can get them cheap in Japan http://item.rakuten.co.jp/e-bsm/063-ultra/. Mine are yellow, but whatever. Not the lightest, but stiff as, cheap, and get the jog done. (oops, mine are the MTB version - you may need to shop around a little if you are interested)
 

scandiman

Warming-Up
Aug 12, 2010
96
0
0
Ota-ku
#10
This reminds me of why I love this forum - lots of good and diverse advice, always.

Half fast Mike - sorry to hear about the knee issue. I am sure you have considered changing back to SPD? Cheers for great advice on water proof shoes and having me look up "WOFTAM" and "YMMV". One for you: NBfYWWM.

Thomas - thanks for opening my eyes to other shoes than Shimano ones. And pointing me in the direction of that older thread, plenty of useful info in there. Including the entertaining SPD Vs SPD-SL feud read.

Chuck - agreed on importance of a light system. And a good looking one ideally. So, yes, leaning towards the more clean looking XT pedal.

Stu - good thing you convinced me not buy those touring pedals. Appreciated! And thanks for the kindness re the shoes, will have a think.

James - very valid point about experience re clip in clip out. But the wander about beyond the conbini bit still holds :) Cheers for stressing how crucial sole stiffness is, have not considered that enough up until now.

Timdesyo, jdd and ikedawilliams - much thanks for your input also.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#11
No problem, Just thought I would set the record straight on Time Cafe Cleats as they aren't what they claim to be!

If you are looking for a shoe to walk about in then MTB pedal systems with semi stiff soles are the way to go

Also notice how I don't use SPD or SPDsl as these are Shimano terms so just use laymans terms when doing searches as you may find your results expand.
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#12
I went from Shimano to Time, as I have a slightly knackered right knee, and the float on the Time iClic pedals is amazing.

Not so sure about the bearing quality in the Times though, and like James said, the cleats last about a month. I am a tart though, so it is all good.

If I was in the position of the OP, I would get some DX SPD pedals
 
Jan 14, 2007
2,516
213
83
Noda
japanichiban.com
#13
I've been switching between my SPD & Speedplay pedals the last few weeks.
Have noticed a difference due to the different positioning...

Probably need to adjust my seat post as well a bit...

The pedal center seems to be different between them and I'm using different muscles when pedalling... can really notice a difference.

May have to put my SPD-Ls on next week for my summer rides...
 

StuInTokyo

Maximum Pace
Dec 3, 2010
1,662
62
78
#14
This reminds me of why I love this forum - lots of good and diverse advice, always.

Half fast Mike - sorry to hear about the knee issue. I am sure you have considered changing back to SPD? Cheers for great advice on water proof shoes and having me look up "WOFTAM" and "YMMV". One for you: NBfYWWM.

Thomas - thanks for opening my eyes to other shoes than Shimano ones. And pointing me in the direction of that older thread, plenty of useful info in there. Including the entertaining SPD Vs SPD-SL feud read.

Chuck - agreed on importance of a light system. And a good looking one ideally. So, yes, leaning towards the more clean looking XT pedal.

Stu - good thing you convinced me not buy those touring pedals. Appreciated! And thanks for the kindness re the shoes, will have a think.

James - very valid point about experience re clip in clip out. But the wander about beyond the conbini bit still holds :) Cheers for stressing how crucial sole stiffness is, have not considered that enough up until now.

Timdesyo, jdd and ikedawilliams - much thanks for your input also.
I put details and pics of the shoes I have up on the TCC classified, once the ad is approved take a look, if you want them, or if any other TCC member wants them please take them!

Cheers!
 
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#15
Was out riding today, when I got a party invite on the bat-phone.

Went to the LBS, dumped the blade, took off my shoes and walked in my socks to the local ABC Mart, got some trainers, took the shoes back the LBS, dumped them, and hit the party.

If I had walked this on the cleats, they would be toast.
 

snoogly

Maximum Pace
Oct 14, 2007
695
48
48
Machida, Tokyo
#16
Was out riding today, when I got a party invite on the bat-phone.

Went to the LBS, dumped the blade, took off my shoes and walked in my socks to the local ABC Mart, got some trainers, took the shoes back the LBS, dumped them, and hit the party.

If I had walked this on the cleats, they would be toast.
Rubber SPD cleat covers work well, though they are a bugger to find and insanely expensive.

http://www.exustar.com/product_detail.php?psn=152&level=2&t1s=31
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#17
I'm an ATAC convert. But being a FG rider, having a solidly mounted foot with no surprises (especially on the upstroke) are mandantory. These were designed primarily for CX and MTB riders that have to endure lots of position changes with high degree of compliance, occasionally dismounting and running, loads of mud, dirt , snow and whatever. They aren't the lightest - but they are solid and the multi-position allows you a huge variance of compliance. (Mike, maybe you have yours mounted in 'competition position'?? - You can switch them to CX position and get more rotational float which may help with the knee.)