Sarah Outen hit by storm

May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#3
Charlie Martell (www.pacific2012.com) has also had his boat FUBAR and is awaiting rescue by the Japan Coast Guard. So far so good, although the seas are still very rough making it unlikely that the boats will be rescued along with their occupants.

I'm in regular contact with Sarah aboard Gulliver. Although she's banged her head during a capsize last night and is now very dehydrated, she's in good spirits and looking forward to getting outa there.
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
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Japan
#4
Just read her latest tweet, looks like she will have to abandon Gulliver. Such a shame but hopefully they'll be able to salvage him later, GPS is a wonderful thing.
 

zenbiker

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Mar 4, 2008
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Chofu
#5
So it's the Japanese tax payer?
Well I'm sure they will chip in a few quid for the trouble or do they have insurance for this?
 

joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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#6
I assume retrieving her boat will be non-trivial i.e. expensive. If nothing else, she'll lose a lot of time. That could mean more dangerous conditions at sea towards the end of the crossing. The storms out there get worse towards the winter.
 

zenbiker

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Mar 4, 2008
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Chofu
#9
what point are you trying to make?
Simple, that she should enjoy her very brave and wonderful adventure, but not expect the tax payers of Japan or any other country to pick up the tab when it all goes pear shaped. If that is the case.
Judging by the comment section of several British newspapers, Im not alone!

Same goes for the herds of mountaineers "rescued" at great expense on the slopes of Japan`s peaks every year. Should be a sign at the bottom saying " Its a mountain, its dangerous... you have been warned and will be charged for rescue."
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
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#10
Adventure isn't what it used to be. Climbing everest is still adventure, a solo trek across Falujeh (Without a phone) is adventure, any of these ocean "adventurers" that set off with GPS, satelitte phones, blogging their way accross the ocean, and bailing at the first big storm after the first thing breaks, are not really worthy of the title adventurer.

Simple, you want to be an adventurer do it without the phone and the beacons. Otherwise do it with insurance to cover any rescue.

This is not a comment about Miss Outen, as I know nothing about her, and she may have had insurance to safeguard against the only charity being that unwittingly paid by the taxpayers of whatever nation happens to be forced to pick up her and the tab for a poorly thought out or executed plan.
 

jdd

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Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
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#11
In the Tateyama area, hikers are apparently billed a lot if they need a heli ride out. But that's probably determined by conditions--true mountain rescue, or just opting out or giving up on your hike.
 

zenbiker

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Mar 4, 2008
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Chofu
#14
No specific mention of coverage for rescue fees.
Let's hope it does cover it.
With earthquake damage, Fukushima and large parts of the countryside yet to be covered with concrete, Japan's tax payers have little to spare!
I wonder what the premiums were.....
"I wish to insure my jumbo sized, sealed bathtub for a rowing trip across the Pacific":eek:
Her site says £11,655 raised for charity so far.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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tokyo
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#16
FE is mainly correct. The long traditions at sea set up comon law, treaties and procedures regarding at sea responses to May Days. Salvages - now that's another story. Obligation and intent is to save lives only. I also worked doing search and rescue (helicopter) on contract to Govt (State). Every 'lift' was billable to the receiving party, via the State arm. However, it was generally waived - at least in Washington State. And, if the USCG or other military arm was despatched, those rescues could be billable, but mainly fell under the general budget of the State itself.

But this can get complicated - because it's also about jurisdiction. A hiker in a National Park would have slightly different obligations, than , say in a private forest or State Owned area. Same at sea - if it's coastal waters, inland seas, lakes or international waters. It's all different who gets despatched when a call is placed - and how the budget is appropriated.

I have no clue about Japan. But it's great that she could issue a May Day and get rescued promptly! The Japan CoastGuard is already known to be one of the finest in the world (at least for Sea Rescues).

mountain rescue you get the bill - rescued at sea, this is coveredby the governments of the world.
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
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#17
By the way - what is the best way to get assistance if you're out in woods here riding and have an accident? Thought about that today as I was riding solo and if something should happen - who do I call? If you're really messed up do they have medi-lift services in Japan? Who coordinates this? Obiously the keitai reception is not so great in many areas, thus , a 'buddy' or passerby would need to reach some reception point to call. ANy other options? Should I be carrying a few hanabi sticks with me? Orange smoke?
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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#19
Actually it happens. There is a budgetted amount of flight hours in the bank, so to speak. Use it or lose it. The problems happen when there are big storms or other events that deplete the expected budget. Also - any rescue needs to be declared as such - however it could have some 'enhanced' services or personnel.

And what is the difference in expense for doing a mission and training for one?

I'd say there is no difference.

Put it down as a training exercise.
 

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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Japan
#20
Adventure isn't what it used to be. Climbing everest is still adventure, a solo trek across Falujeh (Without a phone) is adventure, any of these ocean "adventurers" that set off with GPS, satelitte phones, blogging their way accross the ocean, and bailing at the first big storm after the first thing breaks, are not really worthy of the title adventurer.
Yeah but I am sure the point of an adventure is doing it, not making it as difficult as possible. You call yourself a cyclist but the pioneers of the sport would laugh at you having brakes, gears and hydrating on the ride. No doubt you can ride further and faster than they could and that is surely the point of humans stretching their limits.

The fact that modern gadgets exist make such adventures possible. Even these days it's still possible to be the first to do something. The 73 year old lady climbing everest had sherpas waiting with extra oxygen to help her team make the summit but I'm sure Tenzin and Hilary would still salute her efforts.
Not quite in the spirit of Mallory et al but still mountaineering.