Saddle Rash help

Morton

Warming-Up
Apr 14, 2011
44
0
0
Niigata
#1
Long story, short version.

In early July I got a saddle rash. I tired to self-medicate and failed. Went to the doctor the start of August, told me I had a fungal infection and got something called Lulicon.

After applying Lulicon the rash exploded.Went back to doctor just before Obon to say Lulicon wasn't working. He told me to apply it lighter and gave me something called リンデロンーVG to apply over the Lulicon.

I tried this and rash exploded some more. He was closed during Obon and I was away after Obon. In a panic I found a chemist who over the past few months has had me trying a few things.

At present my inner legs are better but not totally cured. There is always a small rash breaking out somewhere. My backside on the other hand has just gotten worse over the last month. The itching is causing me trouble sleeping and is bothering me all day, as it did when it started.

Today I tried Lulicon again for the first time in 3 or so months. I am desperate, angry, bitter and more. I can't really go back to the skin doctor and say I've ignored his advice and been going to a chemist friend for the last couple of months.

What can I use? I should say that the chemist has been making creams for me. One which has steroids was working but he isn't keen on me using it for more than a week. He then gives me a weaker version of the cream and my rash gradually gets worse again.
 
May 22, 2007
3,595
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#2
I feel your pain, brother.

I know there are some squeamish people on this board. They should look away now.

These fungal infections are, effectively, athlete's foot in your pants. But this is not necessarily all that you have, especially if it's long-lasting. There could be a secondary infection.

Anti-fungals are essential. Steroids on their own will usually make things worse. They can sometimes be applied with the anti-fungal.

The best thing to do it probably find another dermatologist.

Meanwhile, some tips for management while you heal. You need to create an environment in your pants that is conducive to healing.

(1) Be patient. I realise you already have been. You will need to remain so.

(2) If it itches, do not scratch. You must resist. Keep a tube of muhi (insect bite cream) with you so that you can quickly soothe the itching.

(3) Wash and dry the affected areas regularly; at least twice a day. Don't use very hot water, even if it feels 'soothing'. And by "dry" I mean get the hairdryer on it. Completely dry. Then apply your lotions and potions. (Thanks, ProRaceMechanic, for this tip.) Yes it's worth buying a hairdryer if you don't already own one.

(4) Wash and disinfect your underwear thoroughly, so that you don't re-infect yourself. Distilled vinegar works well and, unlike bleach, doesn't damage stretchy synthetic materials. (Thanks, GSAstuto, for this tip.) Avoid perfumed fabric softeners in the wash.

(5) Avoid cotton underwear. Use synthetics. Change your underwear twice a day if you can.

(6) Resist any temptation to disinfect your skin with rubbing alcohol - it will cause more redness and itching.

(7) Baby powder (talc) works for some people. Others find that it causes more irritation than without. Another way to keep the area dry between showers is with an inert sweat-rash powder spray like Asemoa. Perfumed or ionic deodorant sprays like Sure and Ag+ can make things worse.

(9) What happened to #8?

(8) Oh, there it is.​

Good luck.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#3
I'm not a dermatologist - but --

1) luliconazole is a very broadspectrum anti-fungal. If you DO have a fungal infection, you would see results pretty quickly. Within a couple days. If the rash continues - then it's likely not a fungual infection at all.

2) The VG cream is a topical steroid. When the docs here are stumped they just give that to everyone. I think they must get big kickbacks - because it's ubiquitous for everything from diaper rash to acne.

3) These types of rashes are hard to track down - but may be associated with allergy (internal or external) or even virus. So, you need to change up your riding gear, how you wash it, what you eat, etc, until you find the combo that works.

4) You should start by seeing a proper dermatologist who will give you a diagnosis based on something more than 'what the pharmas have spiffed him today' recommended treatment.

5) Until then, reduce your consumption of known allergen enhancing foods and drinks. And beef up on the B vitamins and Zinc. Also - use an ordinary zinc based cream on the rash and see how it responds.

6) Hand wash ALL your cycling kit in hypo-allergenic detergent, then rinse it in distilled vinegar. Never machine wash your kit with other stuff. That's just asking for problems. In fact, I rarely use any detergent at all - I just spot clean with soap if required then rinse it with vinegar. If I want a little extra boost for cleaning, I'll use a small amount of washing bleach - but be careful, as this will sometimes deteriorate the rubber seams and / or elastic of kits.

Oh yeah - and everything HFC Mike says! This is not really 'saddle sore' and so you need to be much more holistically minded about the problem.
 

StuInTokyo

Maximum Pace
Dec 3, 2010
1,662
62
78
#4
I had some jock itch last year, the dermatologist that was treating me for my skin cancer had a look and said that it was just a mild fungal infection and gave me a prescription for some cream, worked wonders and the itch is gone, but he also took a swab of the area and told me he would check that, but it takes two weeks, so for now just try the cream. The cream worked, and the next time I saw him, a month later, he said the swab confirmed his initial diagnosis. Has your doc done a swab?

Best of luck with this, I know it really does suck!
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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103
tokyo
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#6
Cotton is awesome! Just not where you chafe! Because it absorbs and not wicks, therefore it takes the sweat and excretions and simply rubs them back deep into the skin.

Why did the old school chamois work? Because quite simply that type of leather is very soft and when it becomes moist it becomes even softer and slipper. Plus it can absorb allot of moisture - wicking it into the deeper layers. Combined with a generous coating of lanolin (chamois creme) and your tender parts were simply gliding over the surface and excess moisture absorbed and wicked away by the layers and also the woolen fabrics.

Fast forward to modern tech fabrics which wick even better, and artificial chamois which have better profiles and absorption properties and you get an even better kit.

You really shouldn't need anything between your skin and the pad. If you do, then something is generally 'not right'. Or you tend to sweat or chafe excessively down there and adding an extra wicking layer is appropriate. In that case - do as HFC MIke says and use non-cotton (treated silk, microfiber, blends) that will be both non-chafing and wick the moisture away from the skin and work in conjunction with your kit.

I've been pretty happy with my BETONES, which I use in colder weather and / or under thin pad kits. http://www.betones.jp/



Mike,

Just curious--why not cotton u'wear?

Not while riding, sure, but otherwise it seems far more comfortable than synthetics. (Tho I do only use the wicking synthetics on upper body in the summer.)

Also, an August thread: https://tokyocycle.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=2873&highlight=jock+rash
 

Morton

Warming-Up
Apr 14, 2011
44
0
0
Niigata
#7
Cheers that's a lot of prompt advice.


The doctor did swab me and check it himself in front of me using a Bunsen burner. I need a new doctor though. This guy is too quick. (Un)fortunately the other two dermatologists that I know of are women and I don't fancy showing them my hairy bum, maybe in a few more weeks though.

Thanks for all the advice.
 

Morton

Warming-Up
Apr 14, 2011
44
0
0
Niigata
#9
Bunsen Burner?? What was he doing? Ancient gram stain test? Seems more likely he should be doing A Potasium Hydroxide smear. Do these docs ever get past High School Biology here???
Basically he scraped some of my groin onto a tissue. Moved the contents onto a spoon, I think he added some chemical and then held it over a Bunsen burner. It turned a certain colour and he was delighted. Must have taken all of 3 minutes.
 
May 22, 2007
3,595
1,422
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#10
(Un)fortunately the other two dermatologists that I know of are women and I don't fancy showing them my hairy bum, maybe in a few more weeks though.
It's painful. You're shy. Don't want to make a fuss. This is precisely why more men than women present with late-stage cancer.

I promise you, the lady dermos in Niigata have seen much more unpleasant things than your inflamed gaijin Assos. Just grin and bare it.

(But don't be tempted to shave first - that will increase the contact area with your clothing and likely aggravate the rash.)

Although my GP is a man, his nurse is ridiculously shy and prone to the giggles. She apologetically tries to hold a towel around me. Her behaviour is much more embarrassing than any of the examinations or procedures.

The other guy sounds like an alchemist.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#11
Incidentally - if you can snag some Dr. Bronner's Tea Tree Castile Soap (Rakuten), it's quite good for general cleaning up - including your kit. It has NO SLS (Sodium Lauryl Sulfates) and other nasties - and DOES HAVE Tea Tree Oil which I've personally found to be very good for general skin irritations. Dr. Bronner's is so mild and awesome you don't have to worry about rinsing it out fully. Thus , when you cleanup your kit, the soap is / has already been doing it's job! Otherwise - if you are using regular detergents - you need to thoroughly rinse them and also hit them with the vinegar.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#13
Cotton is awesome! Just not where you chafe! Because it absorbs and not wicks, therefore it takes the sweat and excretions and simply rubs them back deep into the skin.

Why did the old school chamois work? Because quite simply that type of leather is very soft and when it becomes moist it becomes even softer and slipper. Plus it can absorb allot of moisture - wicking it into the deeper layers. Combined with a generous coating of lanolin (chamois creme) and your tender parts were simply gliding over the surface and excess moisture absorbed and wicked away by the layers and also the woolen fabrics.

Fast forward to modern tech fabrics which wick even better, and artificial chamois which have better profiles and absorption properties and you get an even better kit.

You really shouldn't need anything between your skin and the pad. If you do, then something is generally 'not right'. Or you tend to sweat or chafe excessively down there and adding an extra wicking layer is appropriate. In that case - do as HFC MIke says and use non-cotton (treated silk, microfiber, blends) that will be both non-chafing and wick the moisture away from the skin and work in conjunction with your kit.

I've been pretty happy with my BETONES, which I use in colder weather and / or under thin pad kits. http://www.betones.jp/
Great advice, or you can do what the "Pro's" do and thats wear two pairs of cycling shorts, or a pair of "nicks' that have a thinner padding section and then put your standard shorts over the top.
 

snoogly

Maximum Pace
Oct 14, 2007
695
48
48
Machida, Tokyo
#14
Epsom Salts baths can be helpful too. 2 cups of salts in a warm bath; 12 minutes soak; twice a day.

It helped to clear up a persistent rash I had in the summer. Epsom Salts are easy to find on Amazon or Rakuten. I think I paid about ¥1000 for a kg bag.
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,598
1,277
133
Niigata
#16
Morton,

I wish I could recommend the skin doctor up the road here in Kashiwazaki although when I had problems he did the same bunsen burner trick. Must be a Niigata thing!

I didn't mind that but every time I went to get creams from the pharmacy next door the old woman would always say infront of all the other customers "Is your arse still sore!?"

I hope you get it sorted soon.

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

Morton

Warming-Up
Apr 14, 2011
44
0
0
Niigata
#19
For what it's worth, in my despiration I'm buying basically everything that being suggested. Something, or a lot of things together, has to work.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#20
Self medication is not the way to go with this Morton. Seek professional medical help.

Also stop riding until it clears up! This is a huge mistake that a lot of riders make. If you have saddle sores let it heal.