Help Runners, I need some advice. Not really cycling related.

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
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#1
Dear Abby, I am starting to up my running this year. Usually I run a slow 10km (55-60 mins) about 3 times a week. I have a best 10km time of about 38mins but that was a Bruce Springsteen song ago. I basically want to burn off a bit more weight so my cycling will get faster when the snow melts, of course running faster is good too. Stationary cycling turns me off. Hate it but running on snow and ice is a buzz. So. Is it better for me to run two higher intensity 5 kms (under 25 mins) runs a day up to 4 times a week, (am and pm) or just do the 10km run and try and up the frequency. I am a bit time crunched but I think the two higher intensity runs will give more benefit than the long ones cause overall weekly mileage is higher. Endurance wise which is better? Any other advice you might have? thanks, Stranded in the North.
 

leicaman

Maximum Pace
Sep 20, 2012
2,474
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Asakadai, Saitama
#2
Dear Abby, I am starting to up my running this year. Usually I run a slow 10km (55-60 mins) about 3 times a week. I have a best 10km time of about 38mins but that was a Bruce Springsteen song ago. I basically want to burn off a bit more weight so my cycling will get faster when the snow melts, of course running faster is good too. Stationary cycling turns me off. Hate it but running on snow and ice is a buzz. So. Is it better for me to run two higher intensity 5 kms (under 25 mins) runs a day up to 4 times a week, (am and pm) or just do the 10km run and try and up the frequency. I am a bit time crunched but I think the two higher intensity runs will give more benefit than the long ones cause overall weekly mileage is higher. Endurance wise which is better? Any other advice you might have? thanks, Stranded in the North.
I usually switch over to running in the winter and tend to do longer runs more than short ones. Running longer distances will definitely increase your endurance, more so than shorter faster runs in my experience. Don't forget though that running uses totally different muscles than cycling. After a winter of running, my legs are shot at the first few times out the bike. Cardio is great though so it means I just have to stand a lot more while climbing.

I would be very careful running on snow and ice though, especially if you up the tempo. I remember two years ago when I went out running in the snow, I managed to pull a muscle, due mainly to changing my gait while running in the snow. Personally if I were you, I would try to do more longer runs, possibly 2x10km, 1x15km and 1x5km tempo run if it is safe. Then built from there. Some weeks, try 2x15km. Slowly build up and your endurance will really benefit. You won't see as many benefits of you go out three times a week doing the same 10km at the same speed.
 
Likes: George5

leicaman

Maximum Pace
Sep 20, 2012
2,474
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Asakadai, Saitama
#4
@leicaman Any recommendation for a make of jacket to wear when running in the cold? A lightweight windbreaker-type.
I usually use my lightweight windbreaker (the same one I use for cycling). It's actually an "Outdoor Research" jacjet and does the trick. I'm guessing it wouldn't be adequate for anyone in the snowier regions though. I generally wear one long sleeved running top under it.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
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Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#5
@George5, if your primary objective is fat-burning then longer runs will work better than multiple short runs of equal duration and intensity.

My recollection from Galloway's Book on Running is that, intensity permitting, the body switches to fat burning as the exercise continues. To maximize fat burning takes a run longer than half an hour.

However, as you increase the intensity (higher pace) the body is forced to burn more glycogen instead of fat as calories from glycogen are not as "rate limited" as fat is (which needs to be metabolised via the liver).
 
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George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
385
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#6
Regarding the top, I use a
@leicaman Any recommendation for a make of jacket to wear when running in the cold? A lightweight windbreaker-type.
I use a soft shell jacket from mamot might be an early ROM model, it has a hood with vents under the arms and a long zip that opens both ways bottom and top. Excellent when you shut everything down, really warm, if you are exercising. Layers are important, it gets to about -10 degress and colder with windchill and lower this next two months. warm head, hands and feet are my main considerations. Tokyo might not need the windblocker so much for running.
 

GrantT

Maximum Pace
Oct 2, 2012
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Setagaya
#7
@leicaman and @George5 Thanks for the advice. I've been looking at some windstoppers that also claim to be breathable since I tend to sweat a lot. Don't wear my Craft cycling windstopper anymore mainly because it gets so gummed up with sweat on the inside. Hope the extra cost lives up to the spiel.

I've found with running I don't need to be going that fast to get my heart rate up. Starting at low intensity is probably the safest way to get back into it.
 
Likes: George5

wexford

Maximum Pace
Jul 3, 2012
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Tokyo
#8
@GrantT - not sure if you sweat as much as I do but even on the coldest days so far that I've run in (about 0 or so), I only wear a light long sleeve top, shorts and my Rapha knee warmers (love these!). Also wear gloves but I find my hands are really warm by 3km so its only for the initial comfort. Don't wear a hat, winter socks or anything else heavy and I come back sweating after only 5km. Cycling my hands and toes are always the problem.
 

snickersjp

Warming-Up
Dec 14, 2014
12
0
1
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#9
i think the longer runs would be better for losing weight. lower intensity runs would be much better too since you'll have less craving for food/sweets after the workout. you'll also feel less tired and very good for your cardio.