Wiki Rules in Japan

Pullus_62

Warming-Up
Dec 31, 2015
2
0
1
#1
Sorry to bother you. I'll be looking on that homepage for a while and watching you forum as well. So Ilearned it's not allowed to travel with my bike in the subway without packing it smaller(?)

But what I'm missing is something like a simple general list of things (lights, bell, reflectors etc.pp) to be aware of when cycling in Japan. In Germany we do have also a lot of restrictions but we have also the (unwritten) law that there won't be a judge as long you'll keep out of attraction.

I'll actually moving from Germany to Japan in April and of course, I'd like to prepare my bikes before.

All at all I'm happy to see that there are some chances to meet other cyclists.
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
1,454
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#2
Must have:

Bell (no-one cares if you don't)
Brakes for both front and rear wheels​

And if riding after dusk and before dawn, or in tunnels:

Front white or yellow light sufficient to illuminate the road 10 m ahead of you
Rear red reflector (no requirement for a rear light, but if you have one it must be red)​

Bicycles must ride in the street with the motor vehicles, except where explicitly permitted on the sidewalk. When on the sidewalk they must move only at walking pace and not inconvenience pedestrians. When in the street they must ride in the same direction as the traffic. When crossing a pedestrian crossing the rider must get off and push the bike. When turning right at a traffic light junction from a multi-lane road the rider must first cross the junction in a straight line, then wait for the light to change and cross again. All of these things are routinely ignored.
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
1,454
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#4
Just had a WTF conversation with a colleague. They arrived in Japan a few months ago and asked where to buy bikes. I recommended Y's Road in Shinjuku mainly because it's easy to get to if you don't already have a bike and they have a fair selection of all styles. Mom is Japanese. The kids (who were getting the bikes) are born and brought up in the UK.

WTF#1 They couldn't just buy bikes. They had to sit through a four-hour lecture and get a form stamped to say they'd done it, before the shop would hand over the bikes.​

She admitted that much of the lecture was useful. Basic maintenance, operation of brifters, how to pack a bike bag for the train, etc. And of course, the road rules above. But compulsory?

She reported a rule I'd never heard before...

WTF#2 You mustn't use your bike bell, unless you are in an area where bell ringing is OK.​

I am so curious to know more about this. Where are these areas? How are they marked? If riding outside a designated area, what is the approved method for altering J-zombies to one's presence and the possibility of imminent injury. How much is that doggy in the window?
 

luka

Maximum Pace
Jan 13, 2015
910
456
93
#5
WTF#2 You mustn't use your bike bell, unless you are in an area where bell ringing is OK.
Yes, I've heard about this. Apparently you are not allowed to "bell" the pedestrians on the pavement, zebra crossings or similar, because it is considered that they have the right to be there and bicycles are only tolerated if they're no more than in effect just another pedestrian. I have also heard about a case where a cyclist was made to pay the claims by some obaachan who got startled by the sudden bike bell, fell and hurt herself. Go figure... On a related note, cars are also not allowed to honk pedestrians, but as light vehicles, bikes are deemed OK to honk at. Of course this is all on paper only (except for the guy who had to pay the baasan, if it's not some urban legend or something).
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#8
Just had a WTF conversation with a colleague. They arrived in Japan a few months ago and asked where to buy bikes. I recommended Y's Road in Shinjuku mainly because it's easy to get to if you don't already have a bike and they have a fair selection of all styles. Mom is Japanese. The kids (who were getting the bikes) are born and brought up in the UK.

WTF#1 They couldn't just buy bikes. They had to sit through a four-hour lecture and get a form stamped to say they'd done it, before the shop would hand over the bikes.​

She admitted that much of the lecture was useful. Basic maintenance, operation of brifters, how to pack a bike bag for the train, etc. And of course, the road rules above. But compulsory?
Yes and for good reason - remember that mother a last year who was held accountable for her child killing the elderly woman in an bicycle accident? They claimed she had not educated her child in the correct operation of the bicycle etc. she is now liable for her childs actions whom was basically underage and untouchable the family sought damages (Blood money) through her and basically bankrupted her for life.

This system not only protects the parents etc as they can now prove that the child/adult received education on the correct use of a bike but it also protects the shop - 3rd party liability - the family could claim that it is the shops responsibility. (although I think 4 hours is possibly an exaggeration.

She reported a rule I'd never heard before...

WTF#2 You mustn't use your bike bell, unless you are in an area where bell ringing is OK.
I am so curious to know more about this. Where are these areas? How are they marked? If riding outside a designated area, what is the approved method for altering J-zombies to one's presence and the possibility of imminent injury. How much is that doggy in the window?

I think again this is either a lost in translation moment - basically it is the same as the road traffic law in regards to sounding the vehicle horn - it is only to be done in an emergency - when the situation requires it. Unlike most people that basically ride through down busy pavements/sidewalks ringing the bell and expecting them to part like the Red Sea for Moses. - basically akin to driving down Route 246 and constantly sounding the horn to every car you pass telling them to get the F**k out the way...... oh hang on.​