Road rash treatment

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,661
477
103
Japan
#1
I have been reading about road rash treatment, i need it for rugby as well as i tor a patch of skin off yesterday. Up till now all i have done is iodine swabs and let it scab over BUT the new covered and keep it moist technique looks pretty cool, having it covered will also stop the scabs sticking to things(TMI?).

What kind of non stick patches do you guys use in Japan? The rest I have in my kyukyubako but not the new fangled moist pads. Cheers.

Oh I read this from Arnie Barker and I trust this is still current.

http://arniebakercycling.com/pubs/Free/Road Rash ABC.pdf
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,661
477
103
Japan
#5
It's on bare dirt/ grit, I keep wondering why I am the only one that tackles around the hips and not a stand up chest grab. Now I know.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#6
Thanks James, trouble is when I go to the local drugstore I can't find Tagaderm or Duoderm. Do you buy yours online?
No I get my wife to bring it home from work - Tagaderm is just a breathable waterproof dressing Duoderm is the healing jelly. But they both go under different names here.
 

saibot

Maximum Pace
May 29, 2012
793
934
113
Taito
#7
No need to buy expensive stuff (If it's just superficial road rash) I did fareast's saran wrap and vaseline solution back in june … worked like magic, although sweat and vaseline makes a pretty foul stench :p
The deeper stuff, didn't heal that fast/good, partly because there's a bunch of titanium plates and shit in my leg and part because I suddenly kept hitting my knee in everything that was in my way and thus opening the wound again.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#8
I'd tend to be pretty careful if I got road rash in a muddy field... there is alot more chance of stray , nasty bacteria. Make sure you've irrigated the wound with a saline solution at least 5-10min to guarantee getting all the embedded particles out. As for healing, the results are fairly conclusive 'wet' is better than 'dry'. Whether you use film wrap and vaseline or it's more expensive (and durable) big brother - Tegaderm w/moisture agent. BTW - both Tegaderm and Duoderm are gas permeable. Saran Wrap is not. I was surprised this year when at the Haute Route I needed a quick patch up from a start line tumble. The Ambo driver cleaned and used regular gauze pad and tape. Ugh! Unfortunately they didn't have any Tegaderm on board. Watch carefully for signs of infection. Things like staph lead to sepsis pretty quickly..
 

mxs

Speeding Up
May 14, 2010
65
13
28
Tokyo, Japan
#9
I'm just getting over a decent amount of road rash. For the small-med sized stuff I used those kizu power pads by Band-Aid, though there seem to be some slightly cheaper generic brands. These seem to be the same thing as duoderm that James spoke about. For the large area I just slathered on the Vaseline, wrapped in Saran Wrap and closed it off with tape. It cost me almost nothing and healed up fairly quickly, but boy did it smell when unwrapped.

James does the stuff your wife have have any generic or brand name in actual Japanese? I tried to explain at several drug stores and they had no clue. I now know where to order online, but sometimes you just don't have the time to wait.
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,661
477
103
Japan
#12
Likes: joewein

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#13
I recently had a small scrape on my forehead and I put a Band Aid duoderm on it. I went to the clinic to check for sutures and they replaced with a plastic grid guard and foam. The doc asked where I got the Band Aid cause it was much better than what they had. Their replacement dressing was crap, btw. I went home and changed it back to the Band Aid. This was at the main Shinjuku accident / emergency clinic, btw. Totally clueless. Much better to just buy your own supplies and have them on hand in case of mishap.
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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538
193
Yokohama
#14
I recently had a small scrape on my forehead and I put a Band Aid duoderm on it. I went to the clinic to check for sutures and they replaced with a plastic grid guard and foam. The doc asked where I got the Band Aid cause it was much better than what they had. Their replacement dressing was crap, btw. I went home and changed it back to the Band Aid. This was at the main Shinjuku accident / emergency clinic, btw. Totally clueless. Much better to just buy your own supplies and have them on hand in case of mishap.
Those Duoderm are really only used for serious stuff, burns, open wounds that can't be stitched and had flesh extracted etc. Actually they were initially designed for bed ridden patients that got bed sores that wouldn't heal. they are very expensive so thus why they are not normally used in clinics or for minor injuries, not a case of the doctors or system being crap but more about providing an affordable healthcare program that is covered under insurance. For a mild scrape they aren't covered but turn up with serious road rash where you have chunks missing they will use it.

The other thing is if you are going to private clinics or hospitals they will use what their suppliers push on the hospitals. Also cyclists or serious sportsmen seem to be more clued in on specific treatment than the average joe so it's no wonder that sometimes a doctor or clinic specialist will scratch their heads when you name a certain product that they may not ever encountered before due to a product being primarily used for op or post op use.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
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103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#15
@FE - agreed. Except where I went is one of the top ER in Tokyo - in fact where some riders here have gone for their post accident critical care. The 'scrape' I have is a bit more than a scrape - I guess you could call it a GASH - and, in fact it's responding EXCELLENTLY to use of the elastic Duoderm. The FIRST thing the ER doc here said was for me to return EVERY DAY for a dressing renewal. That's utter bollocks. They did have a hydro-occlusive sponge type bandage (which they used) with grid-lock film - but honestly, that was not correct, as a typical gash requires some closure assistance as well. Which the elastic duoderm and or steri-strip / sutures would have provided. You'd think they would keep up on these things a little more than 'casual' recreational cyclists.