rinko bags from Ostrich - differences?

ponto

Warming-Up
May 19, 2012
4
0
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Stuttgart, Germany
#1
I was looking for a transportation bag for my road bike and came across some nice (standing upright) bags made by Ostrich, like the bag in this YouTube video. Different kinds of bags are described in their catalogue 2011 on pages 17-19. Unfortunately, with no Japanese knowledge at all, it is difficult to get the differences. Would anybody be so kind to explain them to me? Exploring the differences in “real world” is unfortunately not an option (greetings from Germany!).

Four different classes are available: [1] SL-100 / L-100 [2] ROAD 220/320/420 [3] MTB [4] E-10. The size between the different classes is a bit different as indicated in the catalogue (that is easy to understand :)). Also the thickness of the material seems to differ.

Is there anything else that differs?

As seen in the video, there is sort of a metal mounting bracket that replaces the back wheel during transport. Is this included with all bags?

Do some bags have a (textile) protection layer between the wheels and the frame set? In the video mentioned above there is no such separation. However the small picture in the online catalogue for the Road 220 bag suggests that there is some sort of inside compartment. Do any of the bags have these extra compartments for the wheels?

Thanks for your hints!
 
May 22, 2007
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#2
Yes the thickness differs a lot. Obviously this affects the weight/compactness and the durability of the bag.

中仕切付 (naka shikiri tsuki) means a model has internal compartments for the wheels.

I have the ロード("Road") 220 and use it when I take my bike on an airplane. I add some padding. Works well.

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All the bags on p19 include the rear fork brace. The L-100 and SL-100 on p18 do not include this, although the item is available separately and they recommend you use it.

When traveling by train within Japan I use a Mont Bell bag - more compact and easier to use as it only requires removing the front wheel. This bag goes over the top of the bike, rather than you having to put the bag on the floor and then put the bike in it.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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#3
Hello Ponto!

In addition to Mike's post, can I ask; what is your intended use?

If you are just on trains and want something just to get past the guards, then a super light bag is good. I have a poncey one from Pandani that fits in one of my jersey pockets no problem.
 

ponto

Warming-Up
May 19, 2012
4
0
0
Stuttgart, Germany
#9
The main objective is indeed to hide the bike during train travel. I already have a bag similar to the Mont Bell bag. However, the (standing upright) Ostrich bags look quite attractive as they have a small footprint (= not covering too much floor space). Which is helpful when travelling in crowded trains…

Metal mounting bracket: Having a look on the YouTube video, I think the metal mounting bracket is indeed mandatory. So, the SL-100 and L-100 bags are not a good option for me. @ Half-Fast Mike: Did I understand you correctly that the mounting bracket is included with the ROAD 220/320/420 and MTB bags?

Durability: The main objective is to hide the bike. Nevertheless, the plastic cover should not get torn or ruptured when the (covered) bike accidently falls on the side. At least not when this happens for the first time… @ Half-Fast Mike: What do you think about the lightweight ROAD 220 in this respect?

Size: I have a road bike with frame size 55 cm. Do you think that the size of the ROAD 220/320/420 bags is sufficient? Or should I go for something bigger like the MTB bag?
 

ponto

Warming-Up
May 19, 2012
4
0
0
Stuttgart, Germany
#10
@ OwenJames & Half-Fast Mike: Thanks for pointing out the Pandani bags. I didn't know them yet. Could be a interesting lightweight option for replacing my existing bag (of the Mont Bell type) one day... Unfortunately not as compact as the Ostrich bags.
 
May 22, 2007
3,573
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#11
Metal mounting bracket:@ Half-Fast Mike: Did I understand you correctly that the mounting bracket is included with the ROAD 220/320/420 and MTB bags?
Yes it is.


Durability:@ Half-Fast Mike: What do you think about the lightweight ROAD 220 in this respect?
It's OK. After several trips around the world mine has a few small holes in where things have poked through, but the holes haven't enlarged. The material of the 320 is noticeably tougher in this respect, for a modest increase in packed size and weight. The 520 is very tough, but it's large and heavy and would be a pain to carry around, I think.

Size: I have a road bike with frame size 55 cm. Do you think that the size of the ROAD 220/320/420 bags is sufficient? Or should I go for something bigger like the MTB bag?
It should be fine. My steel bike is a 52cm and there's plenty of room.

My "220" also came with a chain cover (picture on p23) but they don't seem to include that now.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#13
Slightly off-topic -- Owen, how is your Pandani holding up? I heard they tear apart quite easily?? Also - the Cocoon is a great all around choice as you can quickly bag and roll your bike, then zip it up on the train. I also have the minimalistic Ostrich - just simple rectangle bag - open bag, drop the saddle / rear set on the handily marked reinforcement 'squares' , pull up the bag and drawstring. I'm not sure of the efficacy of the aluminum support, I guess if you're worried about people stamping on the fork ends (rear or front) it <could> help. IMO, I'd just use the plastic spreaders that come with frames when they are shipped. BTW - don't forget TO get an extra derailler hanger - if you do have an incident on the train (seen it more than once) , these bits may get twanged making your continuing ride a bit challenged (with cockeyed or dangling derailler) THAT is more important as extra stuff to carry than the aluminum erector set thingy.
 
#14
Slightly off-topic -- Owen, how is your Pandani holding up? I heard they tear apart quite easily?? .
Anxious to know too. I got the Pandini Flemish Lion design but to be frank have found the material way too flimsy :( to even dare to actually use it! I may have been misled by the attractive design. BTW, on the package, it is clearly stated that the purpose of this rinko is "for emergencies only" i.e. not for regular & repeated usage. I'm sticking to my easywrap for the time being....
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#15
When I discovered the ease of Train Portage in Japan - I decided that the best way to take advantage of this was simply build the right bike. My current rinko (shown) is nothing more than a chain guard - and in stations where the staff complain, the smallest Ostrich bag. Foot print is very small and fits nicely even behind the rear seats on Shinkansen or special express.

SBSH06541_1_.JPG
 
Sep 2, 2009
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0
#16
Hey

Sorry for the delay in replying. Totally missed this post for some reason.

OK, yeah I have used the Pandani bag a few times and it seems fine for what I use it for. I can see how it would tear if snagged, but I have been extra careful with it, and don't have any sharp bits jagging off my bike, so it has been fine.

Will let you know if it does go belly up, but I think for a careful user, this will be fine.

Cheers
 

Karl

Maximum Pace
Feb 7, 2011
302
130
63
Yokohama
#17
Bump....

Bought the Tioga Cocoon bag. Liked it, but must have overstressed the zipper. Zipper now fubar. Looking at replacement bag. My frame is 56 and looking for something big enough and sturdy enough to hold up, but one that can stil be rolled up small enough for carrying in water bottle holder or under the saddle. Also one that you only need to remove the front wheel. Choices...

1) Buy the Tioga Cocoon again and be more careful with the zipper...
2) Order the L sized Montbell Quick Carry bag
3) Get an Ostrich bag.

Anyone have suggestion about which of these options is better?
 
May 22, 2007
3,573
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#18
2) Order the L sized Montbell Quick Carry bag
That's a bump from long ago. The fun we used to have...!

My frame is effectively 53 and the L size Mont Bell bag was much, much too big.

When I accidentally lost my Mont Bell bag last year, I bought a new one straight away. No zippers - just a drawstring. It can be used as a windproof poncho in extremis. I would consider a Fairmean custom bag, but I use my bag with several different bikes and it would get real expensive having a bag made for each of them.
 

Karl

Maximum Pace
Feb 7, 2011
302
130
63
Yokohama
#20
When I accidentally lost my Mont Bell bag last year, I bought a new one straight away. No zippers - just a drawstring. It can be used as a windproof poncho in extremis. I would consider a Fairmean custom bag, but I use my bag with several different bikes and it would get real expensive having a bag made for each of them.
The Mont Bell bag looks pretty nifty. Didn't like fiddling with the zipper on the Tioga bag. Slooooow, and weak point of the bag. Only had it a few months. Anyway, I need something for my weekend ride so will probably pop over to Mont Bell and get the Quick Carry.

Never heard of Fairmean till now. Will check it out though. Sounds nice.