Replacing chain rings

Tamir

Speeding Up
Aug 19, 2011
56
0
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35
Tokyo
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#1
Hey,

I'm fixing up my buddy's bike but I've run into a bit of a snag. His bike is a 2001 Specialized CX Comp: http://www.bikepedia.com/quickbike/...001&Brand=Specialized&Model=CX+Comp&Type=bike

He's never changed any of his drivetrain components, and the sprockets and chain rings were quite worn down, so I decided to overhaul them. I was able to order a cassette through the local Y's, but they're having trouble finding replacement chain rings. Is there something special about the Sugino RD5000 so that run-of-the-mill Shimano chain rings wouldn't fit? Do I have to replace the whole crankset? The BB seems in okay working order, so I'd prefer to keep it.

Any advice welcome.
 

Trek DJ

Maximum Pace
Jan 27, 2009
215
78
48
118
Kobe
#2
If BCD (chainring/chainbolt diameter) matches, then you are 100% ok with switching to another brand chainring. Just make sure that the chainrings are compatible with your chain: 8-speed, 9/10 speed.

For future reference, replace the chain every 3000-3500km or so. Doing so will help cut down on wear on cassettes and chainrings which are more expensive to replace. Once a chain stretches/is worn, it quickly chews up the rest of the drivetrain.

Also, no need to replace the cassette when you replace the chain. If the chain doesnt skip under power, then you are OK to go. If the chain skips on a cassette under power/load then its time for a new cassette.
 

Tamir

Speeding Up
Aug 19, 2011
56
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35
Tokyo
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#3
Thanks, DJ. I guess this question was right up your alley. :)

I figured there shouldn't be a problem, but I must have gotten one of the newer employees at the store. I'll have to go back and ask for a second opinion and then get them to just order me some chainrings.:rolleyes:

I'll also have to start harping on my friends to change their chains regularly.;)
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#4
Hmmm would actually advise to buy a chain gauge tool that will allow you to check if your chain has stretched or not.

If you are a spinner and do not put a lot of load on the chain then its going to last a lot longer. Having the correct tools for the job will save you a lot of money and guess work.
 

Tamir

Speeding Up
Aug 19, 2011
56
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Tokyo
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#5
You're right, I should look into getting a chain gauge.

In this case, the age of all drivetrain components and the wearing down of all gears, plus the rust on the chain hinted at an overhaul. I will try not to be so gung-ho in the future.:eek:
 
Oct 15, 2010
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#7
I pulled out a measuring tape last night. According to Sheldon Brown, that is an option as well I think. I do want one of those tools. Lifeline on Wiggle has one for less, but on it's own, the shipping is more than the product. I will be getting one on my next order.