Tech Replacement crankset

Dec 4, 2008
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Tokyo
#1
Seems my five year old crankset is on the way out judging by the amount of chain skipping (under pressure/climbing) unless a different diagnosis - your input welcome.

Current one seems to be a Shimano Alivio probably 48/38/28 as fitted to C/dale badboy disc.

looking at what's out there, is the Sora FC-3503 a likely candidate? I'm no kind of a super athletic rider, might only cover 150km a week if that.

having never replaced a crankset, do I need a specific bottom bracket too? likely my lbs will do the work since I'm short on tools and the knowledge.

Finally, the Sora says 9 speed compatible - if I'm currently using an 8 speed cassette that's not an immediate problem right? just a kind of investment in the future?
 
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#2
If you can get the parts, it's cheaper and rather less hassle to replace the chainrings, rather than the whole crankset. I recently replaced chain, chainrings and cassette on my slightly-vintage 105 10-speed groupset. Good as new. Skipping banished for a few years I hope. (I get through three chains a year, on average.)
 
Likes: CoffinDodger
Dec 4, 2008
169
3
38
Tokyo
#3
If you can get the parts, it's cheaper and rather less hassle to replace the chainrings, rather than the whole crankset. I recently replaced chain, chainrings and cassette on my slightly-vintage 105 10-speed groupset. Good as new. Skipping banished for a few years I hope. (I get through three chains a year, on average.)
If I can get the parts, I suppose being the operative. Good man
 

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
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#4
Pretty much any LBS can source those chainrings. If they say they can't find another LBS. You probably have the allen key wrenches so have at it. Replacing the chain and rear cassette at the same time would be a good idea. So buy a cassette sprocket removal tool. http://www3.big.or.jp/~number-1/No.1_ShimanoFCT4060RP.html


Oh I should have said, the above link is just an example of what you need, I know nothing about that company. cavietemptor e.t.c..
 
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Likes: CoffinDodger
Dec 4, 2008
169
3
38
Tokyo
#8
So today I (much to my surprise) successfully removed the cassette, cleaned it in paraffin, put it back together correctly. It was disgustingly dirty. I bought a new chain but my chain tool broke on the first use (removing the old chain) - had to use a set of bolt cutters in the end to take the chain off - lol I can imagine you wincing!. So recommend another chain tool please? Saw an Ice Toolz model at local hardware store (the 29C3 For Shimano® compatible HG/UG/IG Chains)

I looked at the individual teeth on the rear rings and noted that they looked a little worn but not being much of an expert didn't know how much life they have left in them…..none of them were completely flat at the top.

Because its a Wednesday apparently, no bike shops near me are open to fit my chain…..I tried 4 LBS type shops and two mamachari shops (those two were open but both refused to do it WHY???). So I'll have to wait until tomorrow to see my regular LBS when he reopens
 
May 22, 2007
3,595
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Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#9
I bought a new chain but my chain tool broke on the first use (removing the old chain)
Wow - you must have powerful hands! I've removed and replaced and cut and fixed chains many times with little Topeak or Crank Bros multi tools. The only time I had a multi tool break was when trying to remove someone's pedal at an airport.

This is the chain tool I have at home:



Can't tell what the brand is (the only clue is a "GP" logo). It has clips to hold the chain steady and big comfortable handles for enough leverage to make light work of a tough old link. Bought this when I put together my fixie, as the chain tool attachments on multi tools generally only work with 8/9/10/11 speed chains.

On the road, my go-to multi tool is the Crank Bros. m17...


Or for a longer trip I might take along the Topeak Alien (quite heavy though)