What's new

Repair bike or buy new

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
Sadly the chain just snapped on my relatively inexpensive Louis Garneau MTB - I ‘propelled’ myself to Asahi Cycle where I was told ¥30k will be the cost to fix it up (serious cassette cog wear). I’d used it daily for about five years. Served me well. Should I just pay it or buy another MTB? If the latter, any suggestions? Y’s Road the first place I should look? Thanks
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
3,106
2,626
If the problem is just the cassette, that should not be that expensive to replace. Cassettes and chains are consumables, like brake pads. Basic 10-11 speed cassettes can be had for 4,000-5,000 yen on Amazon. Add to that some shop time.

Only if your crank chainrings are also badly worn does it get more expensive.
 

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
If the problem is just the cassette, that should not be that expensive to replace. Cassettes and chains are consumables, like brake pads. Basic 10-11 speed cassettes can be had for 4,000-5,000 yen on Amazon. Add to that some shop time.

Only if your crank chainrings are also badly worn does it get more expensive.
Thanks, perhaps the crank chainrings are also badly worn, I mustn’t have been listening properly. I could take it to a different cycle shop and see what they estimate the repair cost is. What is the reputation of Asahi Cycle for you experts?
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
2,894
3,033
Thanks, perhaps the crank chainrings are also badly worn, I mustn’t have been listening properly. I could take it to a different cycle shop and see what they estimate the repair cost is. What is the reputation of Asahi Cycle for you experts?

Sounds like you need a new drive chain, ie. crankset, chain and cassette.

In terms of cost, it depends what quality of parts you want and if you want to do it yourself or not?

For Shimano, a quick search on amazon shows that chains are 5,000 yen. The cheapest crank sets are 3000 to 4000 yen. The cheapest cassettes are also in that price range.

Asahi is just a bike shop chain. If you fit the parts yourself, probably about 13,000 yen. If you go to a local bike shop, and order those cheap parts plus labour, maybe 17,000 to 20,000 yen?

Andy
 

speedwobble

Scorpions - I can't get enough!
Jun 26, 2017
192
269
I think 30,000 yen on the drive train of an old mtb would cover the parts you need to convert it to 1x if it isn't already. You could do it with Deore that's 1x11 eleven speed on a standard rear hub. Depending on what it is, you may get away with your existing crank with a 1x chainring that has attached spacers. Changing a cassette requires some cheap tools but it is an easy job. The rest is just allen keys and pliers.

1x is all the rage, so this would be an upgrade as well as a repair. It simplifies the crank area, and is good for bikes in day-to-day use ridden in normal clothes.
 

Winston Leg-Thigh

Maximum Pace
Mar 31, 2015
151
174
I went in to Asahi yesterday (only bike shop in the area except the "pro" shop and I've given up on that place) on the off-chance they'd be able to replace a spoke (shimano straight-pull bladed, nothing special). They didn't have any in stock but said they'd order one in and give me a call when it arrived. 400 for the spoke, 200 for nipple, 3000 to take off and replace the tubeless tape (said I'd do that myself) and 2500 to change the spoke. Then it turned out their trueing stand is QR only so they can't do it anyway.
Ordered a spoke and nipple off Amazon and I'll do (mess it up) myself next weekend.
 

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
Sounds like you need a new drive chain, ie. crankset, chain and cassette.

In terms of cost, it depends what quality of parts you want and if you want to do it yourself or not?

For Shimano, a quick search on amazon shows that chains are 5,000 yen. The cheapest crank sets are 3000 to 4000 yen. The cheapest cassettes are also in that price range.

Asahi is just a bike shop chain. If you fit the parts yourself, probably about 13,000 yen. If you go to a local bike shop, and order those cheap parts plus labour, maybe 17,000 to 20,000 yen?

Andy
Thanks, I’ll keep those approx numbers in mind when I get to the other cycle shop
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
2,894
3,033
I went in to Asahi yesterday (only bike shop in the area except the "pro" shop and I've given up on that place) on the off-chance they'd be able to replace a spoke (shimano straight-pull bladed, nothing special). They didn't have any in stock but said they'd order one in and give me a call when it arrived. 400 for the spoke, 200 for nipple, 3000 to take off and replace the tubeless tape (said I'd do that myself) and 2500 to change the spoke. Then it turned out their trueing stand is QR only so they can't do it anyway.
Ordered a spoke and nipple off Amazon and I'll do (mess it up) myself next weekend.

I had both my front and rear wheel trued yesterday. There was a lot of tension lost and it took well over an hour. I also had the gears checked over. And, by myself, washed the bike, oiled the chain, drank 2 coffees and ate a few cookies.

20210605_160124.jpg

4,000 yen. Basically the cost of labour I guess. But I'm happy with that.

It pays to find a good bike shop, build a good relationship, and stick to it.

Andy
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,658
1,473
Sadly the chain just snapped on my relatively inexpensive Louis Garneau MTB - I ‘propelled’ myself to Asahi Cycle where I was told ¥30k will be the cost to fix it up (serious cassette cog wear). I’d used it daily for about five years. Served me well. Should I just pay it or buy another MTB? If the latter, any suggestions? Y’s Road the first place I should look? Thanks
If you ride a lot, you should think about going beyond disposable bikes. For example, with cheap crankset you can’t replace chain rings, you have to buy a new crank. Other things like chain, cassette and the like are wear items. Many people will never replace any of these during their ownership, either because they will never get to wear them out or because they come to the same conclusion as you, that is financially not a viable option.
 

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
If you ride a lot, you should think about going beyond disposable bikes. For example, with cheap crankset you can’t replace chain rings, you have to buy a new crank. Other things like chain, cassette and the like are wear items. Many people will never replace any of these during their ownership, either because they will never get to wear them out or because they come to the same conclusion as you, that is financially not a viable option.
Thanks, good points - for long rides on ‘cycling roads’ in Saitama & Gunma I actually use a Louis Garneau (again relatively inexpensive) cross bike. I didn t expect this kind of serious wear on my MTB. How much should I be forking out for a ‘non disposable’ (haha almost typed despisable) MTB? Can’t be that long before my legs go and I need an e-MTB. I’m semi retired already
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
3,651
1,848
I think the wear is just aging out of well used parts. They are designed to be swapped out probably more often ythan once evry 5 yrs;).
What model LG mtb do you have and have you replaced tires and brake shoes?
If the frame and other bits are still in good shape, replace the worn out parts and enjoy 5 more years of MTB commuting, more if you service it a bit more frequently.


Are you in Northern Saitama,
I used to bike from Omiya to Gunma 3 or 4 times a week back in the day.
 

OreoCookie

Maximum Pace
Dec 2, 2017
1,658
1,473
That is hard to tell. When I first came to Japan, I bought a mama chair to get around town. It took me 4-6 weeks to wear out the bottom bracket bearings. So that’s another thing: your cheap bike may not be made to handle your use. Also, I find that if you buy cheap bikes, they are virtually never sized properly. I would recommend to invest in a proper bike, new or used.
 

speedwobble

Scorpions - I can't get enough!
Jun 26, 2017
192
269
I was going to suggest a cross bike as a daily-use bike, but you have one already. Are the roads you ride daily more suited to a mountain bike?

If you like the mountain bike because it has lower gears, that can be replicated on a cross bike. If you are worried about age and the strength to pedal, the trend with mountain bikes is toward huge rear cassettes with very low gears. This can done with existing wheels and frames.
 

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
I was going to suggest a cross bike as a daily-use bike, but you have one already. Are the roads you ride daily more suited to a mountain bike?

If you like the mountain bike because it has lower gears, that can be replicated on a cross bike. If you are worried about age and the strength to pedal, the trend with mountain bikes is toward huge rear cassettes with very low gears. This can done with existing wheels and frames.
The (back) roads, (riverside) paths, pavements, sidewalks, grassy banks etc are more suited to a MTB yes. Thanks. I love using my cross bike on the Tonegawa cycling road, mind.
 

Winston Leg-Thigh

Maximum Pace
Mar 31, 2015
151
174
I had both my front and rear wheel trued yesterday. There was a lot of tension lost and it took well over an hour. I also had the gears checked over. And, by myself, washed the bike, oiled the chain, drank 2 coffees and ate a few cookies.

View attachment 31609

4,000 yen. Basically the cost of labour I guess. But I'm happy with that.

It pays to find a good bike shop, build a good relationship, and stick to it.

Andy
I wish there was something like that near me! There's a couple of shops with decent reputations about an hour's drive / ride away but the chances of having 4 hours free during the day are slim to non-existent..
 

Saitaman

Speeding Up
Mar 2, 2018
35
23
I think the wear is just aging out of well used parts. They are designed to be swapped out probably more often ythan once evry 5 yrs;).
What model LG mtb do you have and have you replaced tires and brake shoes?
If the frame and other bits are still in good shape, replace the worn out parts and enjoy 5 more years of MTB commuting, more if you service it a bit more frequently.


Are you in Northern Saitama,
I used to bike from Omiya to Gunma 3 or 4 times a week back in the day.
Was Saitama, now Gunma. Takasaki has got to be the best place to live, the countryside & outdoor pursuits on the doorstep, a medium size city’s amenities, 45 minute Shinkansen commute for my business commitments in Tokyo....

As for my LG mtb, yes the tyres have been replaced, the frame etc is fine, I’m looking more long in the tooth than the bike to be fair. We’ll see what the other repair place come up with tomorrow.
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
2,894
3,033
I wish there was something like that near me! There's a couple of shops with decent reputations about an hour's drive / ride away but the chances of having 4 hours free during the day are slim to non-existent..

Yeah it's just around the corner from home and work, so I'm there pretty much every day. Had lunch there today. I'll be there again tomorrow to chew the fat after an innocuous crash today resulted in stitches!

But yeah, they really look after me, which I am indebted to, and is probably the reason why I've been enjoying riding my bike every day for the last 20 years.

Andy
 
Top Bottom