Recommendations for Floor Pump and Bike Bag

Jun 6, 2007
113
0
36
fa
#1
I've made more mistakes than I care to remember when buying seemingly simple,
straightforward items of cycling equipment (oh minipumps, let me count the ways
you suck). Thus if anyone has advice on a good floor pump or a good bike bag,
I'd be grateful to hear it.

David
 
Jan 14, 2007
2,513
212
83
Noda
japanichiban.com
#2
I bought a regular floor pump.


http://www.serfas.com/pumps/index_pumps.shtml FP100 discontinued?


And modified it by cutting off the nozzle attachment and re-fitting it with a brass lever clenching valve that holds onto the tube valves like Super man.

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jitensha.com%2Feng%2Fimages%2FpumphdA.jpg&hash=04fc370477f23e438630ceb0d736814b


http://www.jitensha.com/eng/hiramepumphds.html




Been going strong for over 4 years now...

the brass attachment was almost ast expensive as the pump.

All up about 6000 yen.

My bike bag is not as nice as some I saw at Okutama so I'll let others talk about those...
 

gmason

Warming-Up
Feb 25, 2007
92
0
0
Nottingham - UK
#3
bags 'n' pumps!

Bike bags, short of flight cases I have no experience so I too would welcome some advice before the Fuji Hill Climb.
At home in the UK there is no need for a bag, I either throw the bike on the carrier hanging on the back end of the 'motor' or drop the rear seats and lay the bike in the back, easy! 9/10 I hop on and pedal:D 20 mins later out in the open countryside....beautiful:cool:
As for floor pumps........I've been caught out with the bargain basement prices on offer on'tinternet:mad: Trust your local bike shop, listen to their advice and then spend as much as you can afford. Currently using, and have been for a while, a Beto track pump, retails between 30-40 GBP, effortless 110 psi everytime (running 95psi due to the elavated temperatures in Japan at the moment to avoid blow outs) no leaks and simple to use.
 

WhiteGiant

Maximum Pace
Nov 4, 2006
1,192
240
93
Kita-Ueno
#4
Floor pump vs Mini-pump...

I have a standard floor pump with the original valve connection - (not a well-known brand "ESSS"), but it pumps up without any problems to over 8Bars/115psi.
The only time I have problems with it is when the valve length is too short - I have found it's best (even if not necessary for your wheel-rim size) to get spare tubes with longer valves!
I now only use 700x23 with a "52mm" long valve.
The connection on the pump will usually not fit over the valve if it's NOTsticking out of the rim far enough.
ie. Buy tubes with longer valves - even if you you don't think you need them!

As for the "mini-pump"; always carry one attached to your bike - But, they are not for pumping up your tyre to normal pressure; they are only to "get you home" after a puncture!!
After a puncture, and fixing it with the mini-pump, I always know that my tyre-pressure is at about 3/4 the optimum amount ; but I know that it's enough to get home with, so....
...And I notice that I always sweat more pumping up the (newly) fixed tyre than I do from the actual riding - and I don't usually feel like cranking hard after that - I just want to make it home from there.

Bottom-line: TWO pumps are good!
1: At home, to make sure the tyres are at the right pressure before a ride.
2: A mini-pump on your bike, to make sure that you can actually get home - to your real pump!

3: For beginner riders: Always ride with experience people who carry both pumps & spare tubes! That way, you will learn your lesson!

T
 

thomas

The Crank Engine
Nov 1, 2005
1,799
203
93
多摩区
#5
The only time I have problems with it is when the valve length is too short - I have found it's best (even if not necessary for your wheel-rim size) to get spare tubes with longer valves! I now only use 700x23 with a "52mm" long valve. Buy tubes with longer valves - even if you you don't think you need them!

As for the "mini-pump"; always carry one attached to your bike - But, they are not for pumping up your tyre to normal pressure; they are only to "get you home" after a puncture!! After a puncture, and fixing it with the mini-pump, I always know that my tyre-pressure is at about 3/4 the optimum amount ; but I know that it's enough to get home with, so....

...And I notice that I always sweat more pumping up the (newly) fixed tyre than I do from the actual riding - and I don't usually feel like cranking hard after that - I just want to make it home from there.

Bottom-line: TWO pumps are good!
1: At home, to make sure the tyres are at the right pressure before a ride.
2: A mini-pump on your bike, to make sure that you can actually get home - to your real pump!

3: For beginner riders: Always ride with experience people who carry both pumps & spare tubes! That way, you will learn your lesson!
1+ :thumb: (worth a "sticky")

I use a "Joe Blow" floor pump with integrated barometer. 3.500yen and very happy with it.

As for mini-pumps I have generally not been very impressed with CO2 inflators. Topeak released two new models this year, a "One Timer" and a "Two Timer". They may be useful in races and triathlons, but I prefer the classical mini-pumps Travis mentioned in his post.

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proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Frbikes.com%2Fimages%2Flibrary%2Fsmall%2Ftop_two_timer_1_07_s.jpg&hash=64c5b25728ee1f8a4f700b2249daacf7
 

Philip

Speeding Up
Feb 15, 2007
765
7
38
Setagaya
#6
Pumps & Bags . . .

I don't think you can go far wrong with floor pumps. Pay a little more for an accurate gauge.

I carry a mini-pump and a CO2 inflater. The mini-pump allows you to fill the tube with air and get the tire back on (without pinching the tube) at a leisurely pace. I then use the CO2 inflater to get a hard, high pressure tire.

The problem with only using a CO2 inflater is once you open the cartridge you have limited time to use the CO2 - the 'close' button merely stems the flow. I learned this the first time I used it - not the best time to learn :D

Bags - Ostrich provide a full range of good quality Japanese bags

Cheers,

Philip
 

astroman

Speeding Up
Mar 19, 2007
264
0
36
Shirokanedai, Tokyo
#7
The problem with only using a CO2 inflater is once you open the cartridge you have limited time to use the CO2 - the 'close' button merely stems the flow. I learned this the first time I used it - not the best time to learn :D
Phillip,

A little trick I learned with CO2 cartridges is to wrap a little plumber's tape around the top. It will stop it from leaking once it is used and it will retain the gas until you need to use it again. I actually topped up a tyre on Sunday with a cartridge that I inserted into the head thingie (air chuck??) in June at IMJ. Well, it works on threaded cartridges anyway. You can pick up plumber's tape cheaply at most hardware stores or of course at Tokyu Hands.

Cheers,

Keren
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,626
444
103
Japan
#8
joe blow works well with me
ostrich bags made in and designed for Japan.
minipump? Travis hit it! I have used a blackburn for about 10n years, but only about twice a year(touch wood)
 

Philip

Speeding Up
Feb 15, 2007
765
7
38
Setagaya
#9
Cheers Keren . . .

A great tip!

Philip

Phillip,

A little trick I learned with CO2 cartridges is to wrap a little plumber's tape around the top. It will stop it from leaking once it is used and it will retain the gas until you need to use it again. I actually topped up a tyre on Sunday with a cartridge that I inserted into the head thingie (air chuck??) in June at IMJ. Well, it works on threaded cartridges anyway. You can pick up plumber's tape cheaply at most hardware stores or of course at Tokyu Hands.

Cheers,

Keren