Rear wheel traction

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,864
1,450
129
...
#1
After getting my new frame sometime back, a frame renowned for being particularly stiff, I noticed that in the wet I had abysmal traction on the back wheel when cornering. Particularly when I was sporting my 60mm carbon rear wheel.

At first I thought it was the tyre so I changed tires but the issue persisted. I run the tyre pressure usually about 120 but maybe its better to be down around 90/100 for wet weather riding.

The traction issue is noticeably better when using the dura ace 24mm wheels that i use for mountain jaunts.

This frame is ridden by serious teams in serious races I wonder how they deal with the traction issue in the wet. Maybe they stay off deep rim wheels if it looks like rain?

Anyone have any other methods to up the traction on stiff frame bikes?
 
Dec 16, 2012
605
824
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Tokyo
#3
Don't think my frame is as stiff as yours but if it's wet I keep my tyre pressure at around 90 instead of my usual 100-110. Seems to do the trick.

I imagine a stiffer wheel will cause the tyre to skitter over wet surfaces easier and reduce traction, especially when combined with a stiff frame, but I'm not sure if this is something pro teams take into consideration when picking rim depth... will have to keep an eye out for that.
 

Yamabushi

Maximum Pace
Jun 1, 2010
2,335
188
1,083
Tokyo (Nezu)
fudoushin.com
#7
Your 60mm are clinchers or tubular? What do you weigh?

Sounds like too high tire pressure. If it's the case, you wouldn't be the first guy to over-inflate. There is a common misconception that very high air pressure equals faster (less rolling resistance). That is only true on an absolutely pristine surface free of imperfections and debris. In the real world it's definitely not the case. It just feels faster because the tire is less compliant and you're getting bounced over every little imperfection in the road. People mistakenly equate that vibration, shuddering, and jarring with speed. In addition to the speed loss due to wasted energy lifting the bike and rider up and over stuff, bouncing means the tire is spending less time touching the surface which means reduced traction. On top of that, too much air reduces the contact patch which further compounds the problem.
 

mau

Maximum Pace
Jun 13, 2013
97
20
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#8
Flat, I don't take the 60mm to the mountains.
If you dont mind me asking, what are the downsides of using aero's in the mountains? Sorry for highjacking your thread but since it is already brought up, i will then take the opportunity to be enlightened. Its not that I'm in desperate to use my aero in mountains, its just that i missed a lot of great rides due to my 24mm tubular are currently confined in the ICU (layers of rimtape+glue=takes forever to remove and clean).
Cheers!
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,864
1,450
129
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#9
Because they are carbon thus worse braking performance. They are heavier thus worse climbing performance, and I have a closer ratio rear cassette better suited to giving me the maximum flat gearing options. And not worrying about the kind of gearing needed to climb a steep grade with an effective cadence.
 
Likes: mau

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,669
483
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Japan
#11
Is it a feeling of slipping or are you really hanging out? Pete's idea of less tire pressure and weighting the outside pedal is a good one. Works on any corner, any surface. Are you leaning too much on the turns? Try steering rather than leaning if that helps. The other thing is that, wet roads are ,as Mr Bon Jovi so eloquently put it, inherently slippery when wet. Slow down.
 
Likes: mau