question for the dads and mums in TCC

kiwisimon

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Dec 14, 2006
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Japan
#1
When your junior cyclists turn 20-22 they are required by Japanese law to choose which country they want to represent and only ever represent that one country. That means either one or the other citizenship, not both. Practically what happens in real life? Can they keep both citizenship and not tell anyone of is it policed quite rigidly?
cheers.
Simon
 
Jan 14, 2007
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Noda
japanichiban.com
#2
they don't have to do anything....there is no official procedure unless you seek it out... just carry on as usual...most famous celebrity halfs...ie. Becky haven't done anything...
It may be a rule law but it is one that is not chased up....

My sons are always Aussies.....Japanese law may not agree but I don't see anybody wanting to take them to court over it.
They are Japanese as well....unless they get kicked out of the country...which is unlikely...

My son declared to me that he is going to choose Japanese.... I told him he doesn't have to choose anything....

My in-laws crapped on about it until I told them there is no procedure and they looked it up and found out that most people do nothing....

Don't seek out the red tape....as you'll find they won't know what to do...
 
Likes: TOM
May 22, 2007
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halffastcycling.com
#3
Why not broaden your survey to bicultural children of TCC? I know at least two.

This question is asked and answered ad nauseam out there on the real Internet.

Short answer: nobody really cares unless you try to become a politician, diplomat or join the police, fire service, or SDF.
 

jdd

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Jul 26, 2008
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Kanazawa
#4
With one 25 and the other 21, your info is sort of behind the curve.

If I can dig it up I'll PM you some other info, but no, there's no real pressure to choose. It may depend a bit on your passport renewal cycle, but generally, j-citizens holding other passports in their early 20s are not required to choose/relinquish.

I'd strongly suggest being completely honest about dual status on any passport application form.

Tho the "law" says they have to choose, in reality they don't. Various excuses like "I might be travelling/working there in the next few years" seem to suffice for a bye.

Our oldest is 25, and her next j-passport renewal is about 5 years off. There may be more pressure then, but who knows.
 

andywood

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Apr 8, 2008
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Niigata
#6
I too have heard it's not strictly monitored.

I also heard that if you choose the non-Japanese country, you can't change your mind and choose Japanese citizenship later.

If however you choose Japanese citizenship, it may be possible to change to the non-Japanese citizenship later.

This is all bar talk though. So no idea really...

Andy

www.jyonnoitime.com/time
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,681
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Japan
#7
Thanks guys. @Half-Fast Mike thanks for the link, i scanned through that but thought real world experience from people i know would cut through a heap of reading, lazy?
Sounds like mine will just keep their Japanese passports current no matter where they live. the only case i know of where someone gave up citizenship is Mr Devito. The junior cyclists was to try and keep things just a little bit cycling related.

Tho the "law" says they have to choose, in reality they don't. Various excuses like "I might be travelling/working there in the next few years" seem to suffice for a bye.
thanks JDD.
 

joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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joewein.net
#8
+1, your junior cyclists can keep both citizenships.

the only case i know of where someone gave up citizenship is Mr Devito.
As far as I can remember, even Debito Arudou did not technically give up his U.S. citizenship when he became Japanese, though he signed a declaration to that effect for the Japanese government when he naturalized here. He had inquired upfront with the U.S. embassy and was told he was better off not letting them know if he was acquiring another citizenship, otherwise the I.R.S. might assess him for income tax for 10 years upfront if he was to renounce his U.S. passport to the embassy (apparently they can do this to deter people from not having to file U.S. federal income taxes).

So even in cases where the JP government asks for someone to chose, they can not take away their other citizenship. Most democratic countries have a pretty high barrier for stripping people of their citizenship. In the U.S. it might happen if you serve in another country's armed forces or get elected to a foreign parliament. Germany never strips people of their citizenship, due to a clause in the constitution that has its roots in the experiences of 1933-1945.
 
Jan 14, 2007
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Noda
japanichiban.com
#10
s far as I can remember, even Debito Arudou did not technically give up his U.S. citizenship when he became Japanese, though he signed a declaration to that effect for the Japanese government when he naturalized here. He had inquired upfront with the U.S. embassy and was told he was better off not letting them know if he was acquiring another citizenship, otherwise the I.R.S. might assess him for income tax for 10 years upfront if he was to renounce his U.S. passport to the embassy (apparently they can do this to deter people from not having to file U.S. federal income taxes).

he did renounce...
Quote:
I also received a Form FS-348, a "Certificate of Loss of Nationality of the United States", signed and notarized by Consul Schufletowski. The US State Department had granted permission to expatriate under Section 349 (a) (1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, and with no exit tax

http://www.debito.org/deamericanize.html.
 

jdd

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Jul 26, 2008
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Kanazawa
#11
Good read, have a few rug rats me self
Nice to see you here again!

***

This is a separate issue from those like my wife and I, with kids who were registered as j-citizens at birth (and shortly after as US), but for those naturalizing, not giving up your alternate citizenship can have an effect:

http://gaijinnot.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=458

Also, I am a "Debito" sceptic, I take anything I read about him (and esp. from him) with a truly huge grain of salt.
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
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Jul 26, 2008
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Kanazawa
#14
And, hormone time, older one's pic from a recent trip: (and this is a less risqué one, some may recognize the location)



(Oh, and sorry, she's been living with her boyfriend for more than a year.)

This is why leicaman's pics are so boring. While it could be, I doubt that thigh gap is one of his specialties.

I like how the shooter got the horizon and the railing sort of close. Probably coincidence.
 
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