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Pain at the front of your knee when running? You might have patellar tendinopathy

adventurous cyclist

turtle speed cyclist
May 16, 2019
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I recently injured my knee. This is really strange because on my computer today, guess what... an article about paterllar tendinopathy showed up.
Its been about 8 weeks now since my injury. I'm able to walk up and down the stairs today without a cane, but I'm pushing it. Still walk with the cane everywhere though. The swelling around the knee is about 80% less then it was at the beginning. I do feel I'm on the road of recovery which is great because I want/need to start touring again. As I posted recently about my bike issues, I've decided not to go with a new bike but to make the repairs on my Giant R3 Escape. Its 4 years old this month I believe. As much as I would like to have that NEW bike with my eyes gleeming at it, its just not going to happen for now. And besides the savings gives me a bit more to tour on. June 5th I'm scheduled for the repair/new parts so all is waiting for me is "THE KNEE", please knee, heal completely fast now.
Here is the article.

fd86c6e5-6d52-421a-b600-4b731d3bb8b0_aaa197e9.jpg
Patellar tendinopathy is a breakdown of the cells in the knee tendon. Photo: Shutterstock
A common issue for runners is to feel pain at the front, or front bottom, of their knee cap.
If you experience this symptom, you may have patellar tendinopathy. It is sometimes called runner's or jumper's knee.
Here are some of the best ways to treat it.

What is patellar tendinopathy?

Tendinopathy is a breaking down of the tendon cells. The patella is the knee cap, while the patellar (with an 'r') is the tendon that attaches to the shin bone, or tibia.
92e74c6c-92b1-4b3b-af0b-790bbf49eb90_84dc7e0c.jpg
Even simple tasks like standing up or sitting down can be painful with tendinopathy. Photo: Shutterstock
So, patellar tendinopathy is an injury to the tendon that attaches the knee cap to the shin, and is technically a breaking down of the cells.



Tendinopathy is often diagnosed as tendinitis and they two can appear very similar.


What to do if you keep retwisting your ankle when running
14 Apr 2022
23212d07-b0ac-4071-87aa-af872df447e7_383d94fe.jpg


Tendinitis is the swelling of the tendon, and may require anti-inflammatories.

But tendinopathy requires increased blood flow to heal the tendon, so anti-inflammatories may hinder the healing process, therefore medications should be used with more caution according to studies.

What is the cause?

For runners, the most common causes are either over use or a sudden strain.
Overuse means different things to different runners – if you are new to running and trying to do too much, too fast, too soon, you are likely to pick up an overuse injury in one tendon or another.
b5a4ea2f-173e-4961-a955-ab0dd5df4cd9_ed2458dc.jpg
Rest, but do not ice your knee. You want to encourage blood flow to the tendon. Photo: Shutterstock
Overuse can also come from lack of variation, such as only running on roads, or track, or on a slanted surface (like a pavement, beach or running track), and always in the same direction.
fd86c6e5-6d52-421a-b600-4b731d3bb8b0_aaa197e9.jpg
Patellar tendinopathy is a breakdown of the cells in the knee tendon. Photo: Shutterstock
A common issue for runners is to feel pain at the front, or front bottom, of their knee cap.
If you experience this symptom, you may have patellar tendinopathy. It is sometimes called runner's or jumper's knee.
Here are some of the best ways to treat it.

What is patellar tendinopathy?

Tendinopathy is a breaking down of the tendon cells. The patella is the knee cap, while the patellar (with an 'r') is the tendon that attaches to the shin bone, or tibia.
92e74c6c-92b1-4b3b-af0b-790bbf49eb90_84dc7e0c.jpg
Even simple tasks like standing up or sitting down can be painful with tendinopathy. Photo: Shutterstock
So, patellar tendinopathy is an injury to the tendon that attaches the knee cap to the shin, and is technically a breaking down of the cells.



Tendinopathy is often diagnosed as tendinitis and they two can appear very similar.


What to do if you keep retwisting your ankle when running
14 Apr 2022
23212d07-b0ac-4071-87aa-af872df447e7_383d94fe.jpg


Tendinitis is the swelling of the tendon, and may require anti-inflammatories.

But tendinopathy requires increased blood flow to heal the tendon, so anti-inflammatories may hinder the healing process, therefore medications should be used with more caution according to studies.

What is the cause?

For runners, the most common causes are either over use or a sudden strain.
Overuse means different things to different runners – if you are new to running and trying to do too much, too fast, too soon, you are likely to pick up an overuse injury in one tendon or another.
b5a4ea2f-173e-4961-a955-ab0dd5df4cd9_ed2458dc.jpg
Rest, but do not ice your knee. You want to encourage blood flow to the tendon. Photo: Shutterstock
Overuse can also come from lack of variation, such as only running on roads, or track, or on a slanted surface (like a pavement, beach or running track), and always in the same direction.




The sudden strain can come from changing direction quickly, jumping and landing without a brace, or sprinting on a hard surface without the proper footwear.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms include:
  • A dull ache around the knee
  • Pain when walking, running, jumping or standing up
  • Tenderness to touch
  • A creaking sound as your flex the knee
  • Weakness – you may not be able to lower yourself into your seat, instead you flop back with no strength in the knee joint. Or maybe you cannot go down stairs without support

Treating patellar tendinopathy

  • Rest – Do not run as you will only make things worse.
  • Avoid ice – As mentioned, tendinopathy is often confused with tendinitis, but the latter needs ice to reduce the swelling. You want to encourage blood flow to the tendon if it is tendinopathy, so ice will only hinder the healing process
  • Try heat – a hot-water bottle will promote blood flow to the area
  • Self-massage – promote blood-flow to the tendon by rubbing and massaging it
  • Light exercises – when it is sufficiently healed for some movement, promote blood flow to the tendon with some light exercises, like slowly straightening and bending your leg
  • Be patient – tendinopathy can take a long time to heal

Prevention

Preventing tendinopathy or preventing it from returning, is preferable to treatment.
  • Eccentric loading – strengthen your tendon by slowly squatting. Slowly lengthening the tendon under load will heal and prevent tendinopathy
  • Strength training – having strong leg muscles will support the knee joint. Add strength training to your programme – squats, lunges, split squats. It will also improve your running.
The article is from the South China Morning Post.
 
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