One Pedal in the Grave?

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#2
who cares! You have to die of something so you might as well die of something you enjoy and gives you a sense of achivement.

The other problem wwith these studies is that they all conflict with each other - athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.

So at the end of the day you'll probably live the same amount of time - yet just keel over with your boots on mid climb up Yabitsu than linger on for 3 months of lung cancer..... I know which way I'd rather go ;)

How ever the other question is " was the research done on athletes who got in to the sport late? or Liffe long athletes?
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,429
874
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#3
Hmmm, if sub-8 minute miles (5 minutes per km) are bad for you... not a lot of guys over 50 actually run those speeds.

I just checked results from a half marathon a friend of mine ran in (he's 64). Only about 10 % of the finishers ran a faster than 8 minute mile pace and out of those something like 95% were aged below 50. That means, probably only in in 200 runners in that half marathon was an over-50, sub-8 minute mile runner.

Considering that most people (runners and non-runners alike) don't die before their 70s, there probably wasn't a huge number of dead extreme runners to compare with other deaths.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,141
43
68
Kochi
#5
athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.
The last thing I read on this topic said that while the life-lengthening properties of calorie restricted diets is proven for mice it hasn`t yet been demonstrated in primates, with the presumption that this would then extend to humans.
http://www.nature.com/news/calorie-restriction-falters-in-the-long-run-1.11297
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#6
AMEN! One of the reasons I got back into cycling after a long absence was that I was dissatisfied with myself in becoming overweight and sedentary. Cycling brought back my conditioning as well as vital 'release' from the stresses of mundane office working. I can't say I've never felt better - but I can say I feel pretty good and better health / conditioning means I can enjoy the sport I love even more. If the 'study' said I was a high risk athlete and doing what I do would decrease my lifespan by xx years , I'd still do it. I believe that as long as activities are kept in moderation and in-line with your ability to recover from the physical wear and tear involved, they'll lead to greater overall performance while you're still kicking rather than a slow, tapering, tail slide into blobdom.

who cares! You have to die of something so you might as well die of something you enjoy and gives you a sense of achivement.

The other problem wwith these studies is that they all conflict with each other - athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.

So at the end of the day you'll probably live the same amount of time - yet just keel over with your boots on mid climb up Yabitsu than linger on for 3 months of lung cancer..... I know which way I'd rather go ;)

How ever the other question is " was the research done on athletes who got in to the sport late? or Liffe long athletes?