One Pedal in the Grave?

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
who cares! You have to die of something so you might as well die of something you enjoy and gives you a sense of achivement.

The other problem wwith these studies is that they all conflict with each other - athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.

So at the end of the day you'll probably live the same amount of time - yet just keel over with your boots on mid climb up Yabitsu than linger on for 3 months of lung cancer..... I know which way I'd rather go ;)

How ever the other question is " was the research done on athletes who got in to the sport late? or Liffe long athletes?
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,736
1,627
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
Hmmm, if sub-8 minute miles (5 minutes per km) are bad for you... not a lot of guys over 50 actually run those speeds.

I just checked results from a half marathon a friend of mine ran in (he's 64). Only about 10 % of the finishers ran a faster than 8 minute mile pace and out of those something like 95% were aged below 50. That means, probably only in in 200 runners in that half marathon was an over-50, sub-8 minute mile runner.

Considering that most people (runners and non-runners alike) don't die before their 70s, there probably wasn't a huge number of dead extreme runners to compare with other deaths.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,185
79
68
Kochi
athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.
The last thing I read on this topic said that while the life-lengthening properties of calorie restricted diets is proven for mice it hasn`t yet been demonstrated in primates, with the presumption that this would then extend to humans.
http://www.nature.com/news/calorie-restriction-falters-in-the-long-run-1.11297
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
AMEN! One of the reasons I got back into cycling after a long absence was that I was dissatisfied with myself in becoming overweight and sedentary. Cycling brought back my conditioning as well as vital 'release' from the stresses of mundane office working. I can't say I've never felt better - but I can say I feel pretty good and better health / conditioning means I can enjoy the sport I love even more. If the 'study' said I was a high risk athlete and doing what I do would decrease my lifespan by xx years , I'd still do it. I believe that as long as activities are kept in moderation and in-line with your ability to recover from the physical wear and tear involved, they'll lead to greater overall performance while you're still kicking rather than a slow, tapering, tail slide into blobdom.

who cares! You have to die of something so you might as well die of something you enjoy and gives you a sense of achivement.

The other problem wwith these studies is that they all conflict with each other - athletes pretty much have a calorie restrictive diet due to the fact that they can't physically eat enough to off balance what they burn - this type of diet apparently makes you live longer.

So at the end of the day you'll probably live the same amount of time - yet just keel over with your boots on mid climb up Yabitsu than linger on for 3 months of lung cancer..... I know which way I'd rather go ;)

How ever the other question is " was the research done on athletes who got in to the sport late? or Liffe long athletes?