For Sale New TRP Hy/Rd PM disc brakes

Half-Fast Mike

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#22
about rotors, basically I would not be able to use the ones provided with these brakes, but either my current ones (yes, 160), or get new ones which are hub mount right? if that's the case the price here is not so tempting, as TRP sells them new for 120$ basically.
TRP price is per caliper, whereas I think this is for a pair (not explicitly stated, but the plural is used in OP).

Your front fork is post mount. Rear is ISO mount, but you already have the adapter to convert it.

So, as Bloaker says, you'll just unbolt the old ones and bolt the new ones on. I was switching from Avid the other day, and I needed to trim a few cm from the cable housing, front and rear, and put in new shift cables because the old ones were cut too short to get a good grip on.

They have a really handy locking bolt for the actuator arm. This is to help get the tension right when installing the cable. It can also be used to 'lock' the caliper when the wheel is off, e.g., bike in a rinkō bag. So no problem if the brake lever gets accidentally pushed in during the melee with no disk in place to stop the pads popping out.
 

Gunjira

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#24
Hey, seems I’m late to my own party. Sorry, I’m intro astronomy rather than cycling lately so not on TCC often.
I‘m selling only one new caliper and would consider 12000, which I know is not a bargain, but definitely cheaper than buying it new. Sorry that it most likely won’t work for you Luka.

Still recommend this over all other mech disc calipers out there if you can get your hands on them cheap enough. Personally I use a cheaper/lighter Spire caliper in the back, where a hyrd would be overkill anyways.
 

OreoCookie

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#25
thanks @bloaker makes sense. one of the things I disliked about these is how often I need to adjust the pads, so perhaps that can be done away with. so is the brake fluid something that needs maintaining too?
In practical terms, though, you rarely need to do “bleed the brakes” (aka change the brake fluid or oil*). On my MTB, I have gone >4,000 km without a brake bleed no problem. And the only reason the disc brakes on my road bike (>1,500 km) will get a service is that my bike mechanic will switch front and rear brake levers from insane to sane. Disc brakes are supremely reliable as anyone who has had a mountain bike in the last decade or two can attest. Even hydraulic rim brakes are a huge upgrade over mechanical ones.

With road bikes you have lots of other ancillary benefits, too: you have access to much wider tires, you don't have to worry about brake track wear (especially on those fancy carbon rims) and have better and more consistent braking performance.


* Some disc brake manufacturers use mineral oil (e. g. Shimano) while others use regular brake fluid (also known as DOT fluid, e. g. SRAM). Both have some advantages and disadvantages, but in my experience, both work.
I understand the basics of hydraulics when the fluid is in the cables, but here?
You need to bleed the brakes every once in a while where you change the oil and get rid of air in the system. Because brakes dissipate a lot of heat, you cannot make a fully closed hydraulic system. That means air and water may get into the brakes over time, and this degrades braking performance. Air bubbles in particular can eventually prevent your brakes from working in the first place, but this is not a problem that will suddenly manifest itself without warning, you know when you should bleed your brakes. As with anything, if you take decent care of your gear, this won't be a problem and part of maintenance. Roughly speaking, I needed brake bleeds as often as I had my shifter cables changed.
 

Gunjira

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#26
This is a party alright.
These are hybrid disc brakes, so do not need to be bled. At least not within 15000km. Check the manufacturer specs. Good info on full hydraulic brake maintenance though.

As Luka has post mounts, he indeed just needs to switch calipers.
 

luka

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#27
Thanks everyone for your input. I think we have a deal on these now. Allow me to tap into our collective knowledge/ experience if I run into any problems setting these up once I get them...
 

luka

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#28
@Gunjira do you follow the forum anymore? Haven't heard from you since Sat at all... Just had a session with my brakes, and rear is really lousy. Everything is tightened, cleaned and aligned in micrometer, and pads and cable are almost new, but braking performance is shit. The only thing I could think of is somehow effed up rotor, but it does not look in the least worn out, it's not bent, and is clean for sure... So I wanna replace that caliper as soon as I can. Ideally, my current front goes to the rear and this hydraulic one takes up the front. But if I don't hear from you in 3-4 days I may have to go elsewhere, it's just too slow to have a week or two between every message sorry
 

luka

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#30
I got couple question in connection to this, so let me post it here since this long evolved from a simple "for sale" thread. I bought this caliper, and expect it tomorrow. But I wanna put in a new rotor as well since I'm at it. I know I need 160mm, centre lock, and ballpark budget, so one would think I'm all good?

But noooo. It appears there are a lot of "narrow type" rotors out there. As a matter of fact, these two were in my budget range, and this one out of it, but they're all "narrow" ナロータイプ. I suppose they refer here to how wide or narrow the braking surface of the rotor is, looking directly from the side of the bike with rotor mounted? It's not about how "narrow" the rotors themselves are, seen from the rear? In any case, anyone knows how should I figure out if these "narrow types" would work with this caliper or not? I can't seem to find any decent rotor not having this label.

Q2: any advice on properly bedding the new brakes and rotor? I'm looking at pros like @bloaker @OreoCookie @Half-Fast Mike
 

luka

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#31
for example, this person says in the comment they bought the Ultegra rotor that I'm considering, but found out they have a "wide" caliper, so they replaced the caliper apparently too! it's the other way round for me, so it's imperative to get the properly fitting rotor

1533817020061.png
 

luka

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#32
OK, finally found it here. looks like this wide-narrow thing might be Shimano only? now how to find out which "width" the caliper is (or probably the pads are?)

 

bloaker

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#33
I am running these brakes on "Regular old rotors" - Avid G2 clean sweep 160s - so nothing special about them. At the time, they were not marketed as narrow/wide. Based on the description, I believe "narrow" is new and "wide" is legacy rotors. IF you use Wide rotors with a narrow caliper - you just have more braking surface than pads. If you use a Narrow rotor with a wide caliper, You will wear the pad funny in that the most inner bit of pad will make contact with nothing except the arms to hold the rotor.

The pads on the HY/RD are compatible with M525/M515 pads from Shimano. Those are MTB pads. I cannot find anything that specifically says narrow/wide for them.

Regarding bedding the brakes, I usually do it in one shot... I live on top of a big hill. First just pull the brakes to learn the engagement point and expected power.

Next, I ride up to 30kph and slam on my brakes, just before i stop, I release, and then repeat ( I do the front and back separate). I do this once or twice to get more of a feel and transfer some brake pad to the rotor.

Then I go down the hill. I repeat the above process about 5 or six times, but as the brakes get better, I am obviously more careful with my pull. I also let the bike get up to 40 vs 30. Usually by the 2nd or 3rd time, my brakes are obnoxiously squealing. By the 5th time or so, they are back to silent and it is done.
 

bloaker

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#34
Back to Narrow vs Wide...
The outer Diameter is the same. So the outside of the pad should make contact at the same point of both rotor styles.
The contact surface is smaller on the Narrow, so the pad hangs off the inside a touch - IF it is wide..

I cannot find anywhere that says the caliper is either Narrow or Wide. I assume an email to the company would be best.
The rotors on my bike are Avid G2 clean sweeps 160mm. Never had an issue.
 

luka

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#35
thanks @bloaker I was googling around and basically saw the same limited info as above. shimano warns explicitly against running narrow rotors with wide calipers/pads, because the pads would strike fins or the connecting surface which is not meant for braking. from the same document, notice on interference. but wide rotors should work with anything, so I can just get a wide one? of all the pads compatible with this caliper, I could confirm 2-3 are classified as wide by shimano, and I could not find a single one falling into narrow category

1533852504584.png
 

Conrad

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#39
I'm relatively new to disc brakes so there's a lot of useful info for me here. I think I may have inadvertantly come up against the narrow/wide rotor issue myself. The rotors on this photo are toast but they show the wear pattern clearly. What do you reckon, should I go for a wide rotor next? Screenshot_20180810-085728.png