New Season Bike Maintenance

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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#1
Whether you are getting ready for the new racing season or just getting out on the bike for fitness and recreation it's essential to have properly maintained and reliable kit.

My latest blog entry talks about something you may have missed!

have a read here

This one is for you Pete!
 

jdd

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Jul 26, 2008
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#3
Charles--I have one worn rear cog that I could feel the roughness in my feet, maybe two actually.

Should I go ahead and replace the whole cassette, or just the cogs? (prolly would do all of them)

Also, what would indicate chainrings need replacing?

(bike's 6th season coming up, I replace chains yearly, pulleys & BB were done along with a full overhaul last winter. I do about 5-6k km/yr)

John D.
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#4
Never heard them called "Jockey Wheels" before :)

Riding a lot of off-road the jockey wheels wore out very quickly, so I changed them often. When I recently did an over-haul restoration of my old Cannondale, I replaced both, and they did need it.

Good point!
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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#5
Charles--I have one worn rear cog that I could feel the roughness in my feet, maybe two actually.

Should I go ahead and replace the whole cassette, or just the cogs? (prolly would do all of them)

Also, what would indicate chainrings need replacing?

(bike's 6th season coming up, I replace chains yearly, pulleys & BB were done along with a full overhaul last winter. I do about 5-6k km/yr)

John D.
Not sure who Charles is ..... But I'm James.... pleased to meet you!

Anyway, fresh chains on old worn cassettes will slip a lot especailly when putting torque on them (Sprinting and Climbing).

I would suggest removing the whole cassette and giving it a good scrub and remove all the grease and grime from it. Then check each sprocket for wear and tear. If any of the main body teeth are worn then switch out the whole cassette. If only the 11-12-13-14 tooth sprockets are worn then just replace those.

But depending on Groupo then it can work out cheaper just to buy a whole new cassette.

Never heard them called "Jockey Wheels" before :)
That's cos I am old skool! But jockey wheel is actually the correct technical name for them ;)
 

FarEast

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#8
I think they are often refered to as "pulley wheels" by muggles (Thank you Owen, love that term although they are refered to Fred's in the trade ;)!)
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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#10
But as they do not change the direction of applied force or allow for mechanical power or torque the term is incorrect, there purpose is to guide the chain over and across to the new sprocket, thus why they are called Jockey wheels.
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#11
But as they do not change the direction of applied force or allow for mechanical power or torque the term is incorrect, there purpose is to guide the chain over and across to the new sprocket, thus why they are called Jockey wheels.
Well if you REALLY want to get technical we are both wrong, but you are more correct, I'll admit.....

Sheldon Brown said:
A typical derailer consists of a parallelogram which moves a cage. In the case of a rear derailer, the cage has two chain pulleys, a jockey pulley and a tension pulley. Different derailers have different capacities to handle different gear ranges.
:rolleyes::D
 

FarEast

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#12
Although Sheldon (RIP) is very informative about bikes he doens't always get it right ;)

Might want to check the definition of what a jockey wheel is:

"A free-turning, spring-loaded idler wheel used to keep tension on a belt or chain"
 

StuInTokyo

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Dec 3, 2010
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#13
Might want to check the definition of what a jockey wheel is ;)

"A free-turning, spring-loaded idler wheel used to keep tension on a belt or chain"
I'm just going by the Bicycle Bible that is Sheldon Brown's site :)

These Jockey wheels are on the derailer, so if I call them "Derailer Wheels" I think I'd be right, and understood by most anyone who rides a bicycle, if you just say "Jockey Wheels" I think most people who ride bicycles would not understand, but to be clear, I'll just point at them and say "Dem tings" :D
 

jdd

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Jul 26, 2008
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#14
James, sorry... (Maybe I've confused you with PRM?)

And, ultegra group, my inclination is to get a whole new unit.
 

AlanW

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Jan 30, 2007
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#17
They are jockey wheels.

No other name is acceptable!

Best one I've heard was a young lad in a bike shop asking for a new "chain-snake". He actually wanted a rear derailleur....
 

GSAstuto

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Oct 11, 2009
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www.roadfixie.com
#20
Campagnolo refers to them as Derailleur <package> pulleys. Or better in Italian - just rotelline (small wheels). Or derailleur sheaves. Technically a jockey wheel is a spring loaded sheave. So you could say that the rear derailleur cage, which acts to maintain chain tension IS a jockey wheel set.