New guy

Jul 13, 2010
279
6
38
Shinjuku
#1
Hi all,

Just signed up here today. Seems like a nice community to join.
I am a Swede staying in Tokyo and have mostly been riding engine powered 2 wheelers in Japan so far.
I have recently started to commute on my MTB from Shinjuku to Fuchu most weekdays and I really enjoy it.
I will probably pick up a proper roadbike in the near future and go for some longer rides.
Bikeshopping in Japan isn't easy when you are 192cm's tall.....absolutely nothing in stock anywhere that fits me. Doesn't feel right to spen 20-30 man on something you can't even see or try.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#2
I'm 188cm and had the same issue. The best thing you can do is go to a bike store and get properly fitted for frame size as this is something you can't change out later :D

A professional bike fitting can cost around 5,000 to 10,000 yen and I would recommend Aoyama-san of Sports Bike HighRoad, he really knows his stuff.

From there you can either order through him, recommened as you will get the 1st service free and if any warranty claims he can deal with it. He is also fluent in English so even better.
 
Dec 31, 2009
906
87
48
Matsumoto
#5
SWEDEN

Welcome!

This forum is great and very helpful, so ask away and you will get responses! I would say if you are just starting out a nice aluminum or steel frame road bike with a triple crankset (thats 3 gears in the front) will be nice if you plan to climb in the mountains. Or a compact double crankset. You dont want to be overgeared for the mountains we have! If you are racing you will want a double crankset on the bike and depending what types of racing you will be doing, that should decide if you want a standard crankset or a compact crankset. A standard crankset is more for crits (short circuit races with many laps) or time trials (flat as a pancake races against the clock). Most road races her have hills, thats when the compact crankset comes in.
Carbon is nice but has a much higher price and if you can foot the bill its gonna make the ride NICE.
Some great entry level components I like are Shimano 105 groupset or Campagnolo Veloce groupset. Shimano Tiagra is a little bit on the low end side but works and will get you out there .I would say its worth the littlle extra to go to Shimano 105. Sram Rival is nice too and has a great pricepoint.

WHELLS WHEELS WHEELS... probaly most important when you actually rolling besides tires and frame. SOOO many to choose from. My advice is narrow down a few bikes and pull the wheels off and choose the one with the lightest wheels. While working in a bike shop, I always was astounded at the difference in weight that some of these wheels were. Mavic and Fulcrum are nice. Alex is on alot of entry level stuff. Soo many though.

If I were you I would test ride whatever bikes they have regardless of size and go with your gut on the one you like, then order your size. thats almost your only option. DO GET IT FIT PROPERLY THOUGH!!!! Many problems can occur from riding on a bike that does not fit. Also consider buying shoes and pedals, they help out ALOT.


WORD
Regards!
 
Jul 13, 2010
279
6
38
Shinjuku
#6
Thank you all for the warm welcome.

I have done some research on different bikes but I keep changing my mind every other day about what to get.
I have looked at bikes like Specialized Roubaix, Cannondale Synapse and also some more exotic bikes of the same kind like the Cervelo RS.
It is difficult to know if a regular race geometry bike like the CAAD9 would be comfortable for me.

It would make a lot of sense to get a second hand bike before I know exactly what I want but that seems very difficult given my size.

I plan to use the bike for getting more serious with my training. Riding bikes seems to suit me a lot better than running.
Very interested in getting fit enough to join some of the longer rides I have been reading about here.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#7
JapanViking,

Beleive it or not the second hand route costs morein the long run as this is sport has actually been compared to cocaine for its addictiveness and related behaviour, I kid you not......the artical was published in one of the magazines last year...will have to have a look.

Once you get the but you'll want to upgrade this and that, get another set of wheels, the list will go on..... Just ask Mike here :D

Go out and drop as much cash as you can on what you want and like and you won't regret it...... it will also motivate you to actually ride!
 

Davad

Warming-Up
Oct 15, 2008
116
0
0
Koto-ku, Tokyo
#8
188cm here. I got my Wilier frame from abroad, sight-unseen.

It`s interesting that you`re considering Cannondale, because that is one company that in fact imports large frames into Japan. I actually saw a 63cm carbon frame in Y`s Road.... This was in 2008-2009. Have you tried visiting one of the Cannondale stores? I think TREK also have large frames; I know Giant does not. Specialized maybe the Allez...

As mentioned earlier, a proper fitting would be best. If you get a frame from overseas, knowing your top-tube length, especially, would help you choose the best frame. Also remember that the big internet bike stores like Competitive Cyclist, Wiggle and ChainReaction have a `no-questions-asked` return policy, and are basically cheaper for new stuff than the same stuff used, in Japan.