New Bicycle For Daughter In Canada

StuInTokyo

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#1
My eldest daughter living in Canada wants a bicycle, she thinks it is stupid to be living in such a nice place and have to take the bus everywhere or walk. Our two daughters live with my parents and go to school there, until now my mother has been very much against my daughter riding a bicycle, she worries about her being hit by a car. Now that she has her driver's license my mom figures it is safe for her to get a bicycle, OK whatever :rolleyes: :D

My mom went to Wallmart to pick out a bike for my daughter, such a deal at $88 :eek: My daughter knew I'd freak at this, so she stopped the deal and today we talked on Skype about this, I told them they were NOT going to buy a bicycle at Wallmart, NO WAY!!

My first advice is to go to some local bicycle shops and look around, she does not need any Carbon Fibre yada yada bike, she needs a decent entry level road bike, no Hybrid etc please, get a road bike and be done with it, a good well fit road bike is the way to go, does not have to be a racing bike, just a decent road bike.

Now, if the prices and the service are not great in Kelowna BC where they live, I'm looking to buy a bike online somewhere, Wiggle, Jenson, Chain Reaction are all in play, but I seem to remember a very cheap place that only sold bicycles in the US, can someone help me out with a name? :eek:uch:

I'm going to ask some friends in my hometown for recommendations of good bike shops but I'm not holding my breath on getting any good info, any help would be appreciated.

Cheers!
 

StuInTokyo

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#4
How about this:
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=86106

Listed as having some cosmetic damage, but otoh, it's a women's design.

Also, why not a cross/hybrid?
I don't like cross bikes, I think it is better to just go the full road bike from the start. I've found that the road bike, set up right, if far more comfortable than the flatbar hybrid.

That is a great deal, maybe a bit out of the budget, but first I need some sizing from my daughter, she is short!


Are you referring to this... http://www.bikesdirect.com/

Good overall bikes. Most are old Fuji Designs/geometry.
Thanks that's it!

Seems shipping to Canada is possible, but maybe a PITA....?

I would rather she buy locally, and build a relationship with a shop. A good buddy of mine lives there and his younger brother used to be into cycling big time, I've sent him a note to see if they can help :D
 

kiwisimon

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#5
I don't like cross bikes, I think it is better to just go the full road bike from the start.
Depends what she wants to ride Dad. But I tend to agree, how will skinny tires work in the winter?


I would rather she buy locally, and build a relationship with a shop. A good buddy of mine lives there and his younger brother used to be into cycling big time, I've sent him a note to see if they can help :D
This is it, best way to go!
 

bloaker

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#6
Personally, I like my cyclo-cross bike tons. Until a ride goes past an hour, I am great on it - I suck at sprinting so the compact gearing means little to performance for me. I have my bike setup very casual for city riding, I love the wider tires and stronger rims when the surfaces are less predictable and traffic does not offer me the chance to avoid potholes.

That said, on group rides I find the brakes subpar and it leaves me reluctant to do them.

BUT... You can spend $1500 and get a bullet proof cross bike that is worthy of keeping for daily chores when you decide to drop more coin in a road bike. If you buy a $1500 road bike, you replace it come upgrade time.

Just an opinion - take it with a grain of salt. :)
 

StuInTokyo

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#7
Originally Posted by StuInTokyo -
I don't like cross bikes, I think it is better to just go the full road bike from the start.
Depends what she wants to ride Dad. But I tend to agree, how will skinny tires work in the winter?

Originally Posted by StuInTokyo
I would rather she buy locally, and build a relationship with a shop. A good buddy of mine lives there and his younger brother used to be into cycling big time, I've sent him a note to see if they can help
This is it, best way to go!
She has no idea what she wants to ride, I think that a good solid road bike, something with a triple up front, lugs for a racks and fenders as well as at least an 8 speed will be good. I can see spending $500 or more on such a bike, it will have Sora components, and a decent frame etc. If she takes care of it, it should last her 10 years or more. If I buy her a walmart bike :eek: I expect that next year, she will need a new bicycle, that is a waste of money, simple.

I don't think she will be riding in the winter, too dangerous, yes it gets cold there in Canada, but not that snowy, I bet that I could ride 10 months of the year no problem, I expect her to ride 6-7 months with ease, as in no extreme clothing or prep. I'll be buying her a car this year or at the latest next year, we have an understanding that we will buy a good used car, and pay for basics, but she will be working PT and paying for most of the gas etc, in the warmer months, she understands that she can get around a lot on a bicycle on the cheap, and it is healthy too. Yes I worry about her getting hit by some arsehat in a car, but I'd worry about that if she was driving too, or for that matter on the bus, a bus she was riding on last winter got hit by a car, two people were sent to the hospital with some deep lacerations :eek:

I hope that if she gets bit by the cycling bug now at 18 years of age, it has a chance to be part of her life from this point forward. She did come to us and ask us to buy a bike, this is not me forcing it upon her. Lots to teach her in this little lesson, buy good quality kit to start with, build a good working relationship with the local shop, take care of and maintain your kit, cycling around a city like my hometown is easy and cheap, and good exercise.

I think I'm doing the right thing.

Cheers!
 

bloaker

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#8
As for local shop and buying from them.... Make sure it is a shop worthy of your business. I have worked for three different shops. I would not buy an inter tube from one of them now.

I love shops that exist to promote cycling. Not shops that are owned by business men looking for the chance to milk every dime out of an uneducated customer. When I lived in Virginia, I used two shops exclusively. One of them was for a mechanic that was great. My bikes always felt new when he worked on it. Even if I just had it in there for him to put a new headset on (the only tool I lack).

The other shop is a rider/enthusiast that quite his corporate job to start a bike shop. I broke a chain while riding with one of his mechanics.... I forgot my tools were in my MTB camelback vs my road... and I was stranded. Called the shop owner and asked if he could pick me up... instead, he showed up with a new masterlink and a chain tool. When I got to his shop, he refused to let me pay for it. I have gone out of my way to frequent him.

My old employer I will not buy anything from... He will tell someone anything necessary to get them to buy what he has in stock. His tactics are dirty in my opinion and have pushed people onto the wrong size bikes more often than not. Also, many items are marked well above retail. The assumption is that people will just grab it while buying a bike. He then cuts you a deal on the over priced accessory and then you think he is nice. In the end, he sold you everything at MSRP. He aims to please the uneducated customer.

Offer me something the internet shop can't. Offer me service. If you have that, you will get all of my $$$.
 

Sikochi

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#11
I`m sure you`ve probably already thought of it, but are there any second hand places around? That would be my first port of call, assuming you have someone who can check the bike over, if not bought from a shop.
 

StuInTokyo

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#12
Yeah I'm looking at used, but I've got no one there that can really help. Most of the shops in town I can find look like the cheap bikes they have start at $800 or more. The used thing is a problem because so much on the used market there is stolen :eek:uch: Stuff like "Selling quick, $2500 new, will sell for $500...." No thanks.

I have been looking around, I found this one.....

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_535095_-1___202401

Looks like a heck of a deal...?

Now I'm having a problem with their shopping cart, seems I cannot have a billing address in Japan and a shipping address in Canada....:eek:uch:
 

StuInTokyo

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#13
I just ran that bike through the Bike Nashbar shopping cart, shipping and handling charges, plus taxes are about 24,000 yen on a 37,000 yen bicycle.....

I'm hoping she can find something local.... :rolleyes:
 

Sikochi

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#14
Was going to suggest that you could try sending their customer services an email explaining the situation, and that might work, but, clicking on the link, none of them are listed as being in stock. Obviously, I don`t know such things, so feel free to ignore my comment, but from what I read, importing stuff into Canada from the US can incur a lot of charges.

The Bikes Direct site has this for $500. I`d be tempted to give their Canada line a ring and see what they have to say re:charges/shipping/offers.
2011 Fuji Finest 2.0 Womens
Sport Women Specific Road
27 Spd, AL Frame, Carbon Fork
Click >HERE< For More Info
$499 (Compare $900)
 

FarEast

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#15
To be honest I would strongly suggest a LBS - if this is her first bike theen she is probably going to require a lot of after service support.

A LBS is going to be more supportive. I suggest getting in contact with any local cycling club close to where she will be staying and finding out what shop they recommend.

I would suggest a level entry GIANT or SCOTT - good bikes with a good warranty program and due to thee margins shops make on them they are very well supported. Also because they are a international brand that doesn't have domestic market only models you can go check the bike out here in Japan and make the recommendations to the shop in Canada regarding potential changes.
 

bloaker

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#17
To be honest I would strongly suggest a LBS - if this is her first bike theen she is probably going to require a lot of after service support.

A LBS is going to be more supportive. I suggest getting in contact with any local cycling club close to where she will be staying and finding out what shop they recommend.

I would suggest a level entry GIANT or SCOTT - good bikes with a good warranty program and due to thee margins shops make on them they are very well supported. Also because they are a international brand that doesn't have domestic market only models you can go check the bike out here in Japan and make the recommendations to the shop in Canada regarding potential changes.
Fuji is another high margin bike.
 

StuInTokyo

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#18
Bopping around the net, it seems that there are two kinds of shops in my hometown, bicycle shops that a basic single speed town bike starts are over $500 and Walmart :eek:uch: A buddy there his younger brother is an avid cyclist so he has recommended one shop in particular, on the web they look good, but also on the web the cheapest road bike they sell is a Norco Valence 3 at $819.

I see they do have a some decent hybrids.....

>> Norco Indie Four << for $439 looks not bad.

I think I'll give her a budget, and tell her to go to this shop, they look good, they have group rides and such as well, so I hope that she can get some help.

Thanks to you all for the help, cheers!
 

StuInTokyo

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#19
Oh I forgot to mention I found the flyer for the $88 bike at Walmart.....

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fi295.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fmm155%2FStuInTokyo%2Fcycling%2Fbike_of_doom.jpg&hash=8887a5ab2ec677d6e16c83880ef75d27


I looked it up on line and this is what I found....

>> Bike of Doom 2 <<

It was to be his second project, but after only 17 days he just gave up on the POS :D

yeah, $88 dollars is going to buy you a real bicycle.... :rolleyes: