Need advice about first road bike selection

microcord

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Buy a rechargeable front and rear light. Much better than reflectors.

Long and slim "mini" pumps are better than short and fat ones. Long (and relatively heavy) and ugly pumps are good. I can believe that some are better than this Bridgestone thing, but if they exist then I haven't encountered them. Yes, this model is guaranteed to make the frame it's attached to look less desirable. But if your chums carrying svelte little pumps have to use the damn things, they'll envy you. (Lend them your monstrosity.)
 

Ratchet21

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Sep 7, 2020
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Thanks everyone!

I think I will try to grab few necessities before the weekend in case i'm joining some ride!
I already have multi tools and tube patch kits from my folding bikes

Saddle Bag
Considering the one Kiwismon recommended the To Peak Surival Tool Wedge II, but not sure if the lower part can fit 2 tubes, or is 1 tubes enough?

Mini Pump
Either Topeak Road Morph G or Mini Morph G

I wonder will that be enough?

Also is there anything that we will be using no matter which bike we change too? For example something we can invest in a really good one so even when we upgrade/change our bike we will carry it over. I'm thinking should I get a good saddle and pedals.

Also for cycle wear, I wonder how do people here prepare for cycling in Winter haha.
 
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pedalist

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Yes, saddle and to some (or even many) pedals are important. But for both "good" is a very subjective matter and doesn't necessarily mean "expensive". "Good" is what fits you. And what fits you can be very different from what fits others. For now I'd go with the saddle and pedals which came with the bike and see how they feel. @luka probably could guide you through the process of finding a saddle, if it turns out to be necessary some miles down the road.
A pair of "good" (see above) cycling shorts are nice thing to have from the beginning though. I went from middle class shorts with rather thick padding (stock saddle), to middle class shorts with a little thinner padding (nicer saddle), to upper-middle class shorts with medium thick padding (was a present). That got me covered for up to 300 km (probably not at the moment though, since I'm not riding much).
 

microcord

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Get a bigger saddle bag for longer rides (for which you'll want/need to carry rather more) and a smaller one for shorter rides. Whatever locking device you're going to use, how are you going to carry it? (And your rain jacket?)

"The smallest Morph® [... fills] both fat and skinny tires with ease": I don't believe it.
 

OreoCookie

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Agreed, a saddle bag is a must. Topeak’s are good, I have one on my mountain bike, but I find them a bit ugly. They work well, though. I have a small Lezyne pump that is probably smaller than the two the OP mentioned. I have used them a few times, and it works really well. Does it work as quickly as my floor pump. Nope. But for what it is, it works perfectly. Especially on my mountain bike I’d change tire pressures during the ride, usually before going off road and then pumping up the tires for on road travel.

Also, you want a bottle cage or two. Cheap plastic bottle cages work just fine. And you want two bottles. I like Camelbak’s line of bottles, especially the large insulated ones.

Regarding pedals, you’d eventually want to think about getting clipless pedals. We can give you advice then.
 

microcord

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A vote here for non-insulated water bottles. Insulation just means it takes rather longer for the contents to become lukewarm (or, in summer, hot). But it will be lukewarm soon enough. Of course insulated bottles have a lower ratio of internal volume to external volume; they're also harder to squeeze.

For one-day but long rides (where you might want to carry a spare tyre, jacket, lock, chain-splitter, food, etc), I recommend the smallest (six-litre) version of this Topeak bag. Its rivals can be just as good but tend to be more expensive.

For a lazy "bike bag" -- remove front wheel, attach it to frame, throw cover over the result, tighten drawstrings, tuck drawstrings into tiny pocket -- I recommend the Giant "superlight bike bag", in regular or XL size. Get this from any Giant store. It comes with curiously numerous, poorly designed straps. Replace these with a small number of good straps (e.g. from a branch of Ishii Sports) and the total price will still be less than that of the similar Mont-Bell cover ("bag").
 

OreoCookie

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A vote here for non-insulated water bottles. Insulation just means it takes rather longer for the contents to become lukewarm (or, in summer, hot). But it will be lukewarm soon enough. Of course insulated bottles have a lower ratio of internal volume to external volume; they're also harder to squeeze.
I don’t think they are harder to squeeze, especially the previous-gen bottles. I prefer the insulated ones, because I usually drink my water or sportsmix faster than they warm. I also usually put ice in them and/or put the bottles in the freezer. When I refill them with something cold, it will likewise remain cold. You are right that the volume is slightly smaller. In either case, I would go for the large bottles.
 

kiwisimon

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Saddle Bag
I have three Topeak which means I can switch them in and out as rides change. My daily 30km loop I take a air charge and a tube and minitool in a fist size bag.
Longer rides I use a bigger bag with more space for gear (battery charger, wallet more spares).
Riding from Tokyo you should look at an expandable saddlebag.
Clothes I carry in my pockets as I take them off. Soft things in bike shirt pockets works fine but hard things should be in the saddle bag.
Mini Pump
I find the Lezyne Road Drive Alloy mini pump the best I've ever used. But you should get a floor pump as well.

Also is there anything that we will be using no matter which bike we change too? For example something we can invest in a really good one so even when we upgrade/change our bike we will carry it over.
Multi tool and pump. Thats why having the same brand's mounting brackets on different bikes makes it easy to switch.

Also for cycle wear, I wonder how do people here prepare for cycling in Winter haha.
Start with a basic range of PearlIzumi and then see what works and doesn't, You are from Singapore so I am guessing you will need three layers. Ask your LBS but you will need tights and a long sleeve thermal jersey. https://www.pearlizumi.co.jp/list/mens
 
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Ratchet21

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Thanks for all the recommendation! Will do some homework about it!
Other than tubes the rest I might need some time before I decide which to get, will need to double check about dimensions too for some pump size and saddle bag to avoid hitting the thighs from the back.

Maybe will have to skip cycling half fast or other friends this weekend to avoid cycling without the necessities...
 

OreoCookie

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Start with a basic range of PearlIzumi and then see what works and doesn't, You are from Singapore so I am guessing you will need three layers. Ask your LBS but you will need tights and a long sleeve thermal jersey. https://www.pearlizumi.co.jp/list/mens
Pearl Izumi makes great stuff, I love my 10+-year old Pearl Izumi Pro softshell jacket, one of my best pieces of kit ever. But: Pearl Izumi gear sold in Japan is made for Asians with shorter limbs. I find a lot of their gear sold inside Japan does not fit me.
 

kiwisimon

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Agree about PI having short sleeves in some cases. , definitely a try before you buy ,but they fit thin and a size up ot two will get that extra length.
 
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Cactaur

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Personally I hate tiny hand pumps for doing anything over 50psi. I got a lifeline pump that you brace against the floor. not for weight weenies but so much easier.

 
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kiwisimon

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Personally I hate tiny hand pumps for doing anything over 50psi. I got a lifeline pump that you brace against the floor. not for weight weenies but so much easier.
that's why I like pumps with hoses, spin the valve down to the bottom and brace the pump on your foot. So much easier than those pumps that connect directly to the valve.
Long and slim "mini" pumps are better than short and fat ones. Long (and relatively heavy) and ugly pumps are good. I can believe that some are better than this Bridgestone thing,
I tried one of them about 10 years ago but it shat itself 40kms from home. Had to wait over an hour for the next cyclist to roll along. No drivers stopped to see if I was okay:cry:. trashed it as soon as I got home.
 
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Cactaur

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Ha looks like my lifeline. Mines worked well so far touch wood. Sample size n=1
 
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microcord

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Sorry to hear about the shitty pump, @kiwisimon . Mine has been fine. And it has had plenty of use, used on others' tyres in preference to the riders' own stumpy little pumps.

I've been happy with Bridgestone inner tubes too. I've had little experience of Bridgestone tyres: the one pair I used lasted a surprisingly short time. Never again!
 

jdd

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I think this was the point of denouement: (and I was hoping it'd get here eventually!)

Hi all! Just got my bike back from LBS and took it for a ride to test out the setup! Wow, it feel so different compared to my folding bike, without realizing I actually cycled 20km and Im feeling fresh like I just stepped out of house.

Spez is doing the final check for me about the recall, but over the phonecall it seems like it is fine! The LBS also did some arrangement for me too with my inputs after the ride.

I'd like to thank everyone for the time and advise given here, I really appreciate all the kind inputs. Hopefully we'll have chance to cycle together some day!

Here's a pic with the bike fresh out of LBS!
View attachment 21038
Everything from there to here (and beyond) is epilogue.

...and I hope there's a happily ever after!
 

Ratchet21

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Thanks everyone! I roughly know what to get and complete everything!
Gonna get my bike to LBS and try to get everything I need at 1 go! Just a little worried about saddle bag because I definitely don't want it to hit my thigh while I cycle!

Thanks again and be back soon with more questions!!! (About other stuff!)
 

joewein

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+1 for Camelbak water bottles. I always ride with two Camelbak Podium bottles though I don't always fully fill both if the weather is cool. Mine are uninsulated for extra volume: Drinking warm water beats having run out of lukewarm water. The jet valve on the Podium works great. No need to lock / unlock to prevent spills, except when you stuff them in a bag where they may get squeezed (e.g. during train rides).

My pump is a Topeak Turbo Morph G which has good air volume (I use 42 mm tires), a hose and a pressure gauge. It has helped my ride mates numerous times (I hardly ever puncture). I own two of them, one on each bike.