Lynskey frames this and that

luka

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I'm not there just yet, but have been eyeing Ti frames for a while, and specifically Lynskeys. My current commuter is a bit hard on me (Al frame - 35 mm tires) if I do 4-5 days of commuting a week (usually 30 km one way), and it's suffered somewhat over the past 4 years or so of use. So I'm thinking of a bike that would be mainly for commuting, but also for some weekend rides where off-road/ gravel is included (pretty rare I guess yeah). I've seen some of their frames take up to 45 mm tires, and can have mounts for fenders/ racks should I want to go that way. I believe some people here (@andywood @bloaker @Half-Fast Mike @anyoneelse?) have first hand experience with Lynskey, and as anecdotal as it may be I'd appreciate any input the forum might have on these or any other issues you think worth sharing:

- what's their customer service like?
- did you get slapped with import fees when first buying it from the States? how costly is that?
- I'm mainly out to get comfort and longevity - in your opinion is Lynskey frame going to deliver? more broadly, is Ti really significantly and noticeably superior in these fields to carbon and/or steel?
- the frames I'm looking at (like this or this) go for 1,400-1,500 USD (fork, headset, seatpost, rear axle, spare RD hanger, worlwide shipping incl) but do you think there are other makers/ brands worth considering (in Ti or broader)?
- any thoughts on 6AL/4V vs 3AL-2.5V Ti alloys?

The drivetrain (mostly shimano 7000 series) and brakes (TRP HyRd) will be transplanted from the current commuter, but I'm gonna need a new wheelset built around through axles for this eventually, so that's another expense that's holding me back for now.
 

stu_kawagoe

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They are obviously good bikes but I’m not a big fan of their perpetual “on sale” business model. I’d shop around if I was you before buying from them. Ti frames are getting pretty popular again and there are other builders out there offering similar quality and value. Just my two cents😉
 
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luka

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yeah, still not sold on Lynskey, just reaaaaly interested. still, they beat Japanese makers I could find, such as this one with 2011 website and even Grobal Site

1560655489667.png
 

bloaker

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I have limited experience with 'their' frame - I helped @Half-Fast Mike build his up.
Overall impression was that it is a nice/solid build. Welds are nicely done. Not art-worthy, however consistent and quality.
The bike went together as expected and looked quite nice when complete.

I have more experience with a Lynskey built "other brand" frame.
Lynskey has done some frames for other companies in the past. I own one. As with Mike's build, it is looks good (how can Ti not look good) and the welds are uniform. I initially hated the bike. It was an upgrade replacement to a steel frame that was warrantied. I likes the frame that was warrantied, so even though the replacement was an upgrade, it wasn't the bike I wanted. I was able to channel my anger into trying to break this bike. I was doing 2 meter drops, rock gardens, etc... If the bike should break doing it, I did it. I wanted it to fail so miserably it isn't even funny. But funny thing happened in the process. As the bike refused to break, I was getting more and more confident with it and trying dumber stuff. And the more I tried to break the bike, the more I liked it. In the end, I still own it a few years later and still enjoy riding it. However it has been shipped back to the states to be my ride back home when I visit.

As for "is Ti worth it?" - I don't know.
I have bought another two bikes since - and both steel.
I have shipped my Ti bike to the states and kept the steel and carbon ones here.
In the end, it is all about what you want to do with it and what you expect from it.
I prefer the ride of quality steel to anything.
My road bike, fargo and hardtail MTBs are steel.
Both my carbon bikes are full suspension, so steel isn't part of the equation here.

I know many swear by Ti and that is preference. I don't doubt them at all, but it just hasn't been my experience to freak out over Ti.

If you are not worried about speed....
https://salsacycles.com/bikes/fargo/2019_fargo_apex_1
This bike is just dumb fun. Swap out a few parts and it can be more road worthy.
Check your ego speedwise and just enjoy the ride as is.
Add fenders and a rack or two and you have a very capable touring setup with off road capability.
The bike can also take monster truck tires!!! A full blown 29x3 fits on this thing!

My wife has one of these...
https://salsacycles.com/bikes/vaya/2019_vaya_105
I will admit, I am a little jealous of this bike. Hers is built up with hand me down parts and her size/year was 26" wheels, so she even has my old Chris Kings on it. Like the Fargo, this won't win any local Crits, however it is a joy to ride and makes you want to go a little further down that abandoned road than a cross bike or road bike would.
 
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kiwisimon

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what's their customer service like?
Good, they stand behind their products %100
- did you get slapped with import fees when first buying it from the States? how costly is that?
I got hit for import taxes on my frame which is fair enough as I bought a new product worth a few grand into the country. Maybe you could bribe a US DOD sponsored person to get it shipped tax free on your behalf?

- I'm mainly out to get comfort and longevity - in your opinion is Lynskey frame going to deliver? more broadly, is Ti really significantly and noticeably superior in these fields to carbon and/or steel?
The material of the frame is probably immaterial. Any frame can be built to any ride characteristic. I have a 12 year gravel bike that is Ti. Rides very smooth but I went Ti only for durability and the lifetime warranty I got for the frame.

- the frames I'm looking at (like this or this) go for 1,400-1,500 USD (fork, headset, seatpost, rear axle, spare RD hanger, worlwide shipping incl) but do you think there are other makers/ brands worth considering (in Ti or broader)?
There are plenty of very good bikes out there. My son is riding a Alloy Spesh Diverge with carbon fork and it's ride is really smooth. In fact it's as smooth as mine, and lighter!
- any thoughts on 6AL/4V vs 3AL-2.5V Ti alloys?
How much are you willing to spend on a commuter bike that isn't going to be raced and where weight isn't a prime concern?
https://forums.roadbikereview.com/bikes-frames-forks/3al-2-5v-vs-6al-4v-77920.html

Take your time and consider many options, often times buying local is also a good option.

oh did you see this with free international shipping ?
https://lynskeyperformance.com/sportive-disc-road-frame/
Yum!!!
 
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leicaman

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I have a Litespeed T2 Ti bike and really like it. It’s 3/2.5 Ti and while I’ve never ridden the T1SL 6/4, I have zero complaints about the way it rides. It isn’t quite as smooth as my steel Field (with the same wheelset) but it weighs considerably less.
I have a gravel bike, the Niner RLT in steel. It’s a beautiful bike but if I had to buy again , I would probably get something like the GR270 you posted. That’s a pretty tempting price for a frame set with seatpost. One of my main reasons for liking Ti is that I don’t have to care about it getting scratched. I’m paranoid when I ride my Field and never take it on the train in a rinko for fear of the front wheel scratching all the paintwork. I never give it a thought when I throw my T2 in the rinko.

If I were you, I would get the Gr270. It will be a super versatile bike and would be a blast in the gravel roads around Tokigawa and further a field.
 
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luka

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thanks for the responses!

@bloaker yeah next bike (frame) is going to be either steel or Ti. I have a top range carbon one as a road bike, and wanna get a taste of one of these two metals (have had Al bikes over the years too). no racing or KOMing or anything, but I do have to get to and from work reasonably efficent, so fargo wouldn't do. just looking at that tiny chainring... Vaya might be viable tho

@kiwisimon Sportive one only takes 32mm tires. I'd like to fit at least 35-38 mm on this bike. also, if you add fork, seatpost, headset, industrial finish etc, it's not as appealing as the other ones any longer as there's no real price advantage.

@leicaman yeah, really tempted there. then again, just 200$ more and there's the PRO GR :)
 

andywood

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Every thing seems covered but I second that customer service is good. They are true to their lifetime warranty. When I took advantage of mine they also repolished the frame, added new decals, bolts, seat clamp etc. When it came back (very quick turnaround) we thought it was a new frame at first.

Bike still looks and feels like new. Forgot when I bought it...

Andy
 

andywood

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which one do you have again @andywood ? what happened with having to claim warranty?
R340?

Just an image from google but zoom into the dropouts. The fancy clover cracked.

I was hit by a car which may or may not have caused it.

But a design fault I reckon which is maybe why they did the repair with no questions asked.

Andy

p4pb11407229.jpg
 
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luka

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that's a stunner right there @andywood glad it worked out for you, but I was under the impression Ti is hard to fix (unlike steel) because the material properties do not really allow lotsa tinkering before the structural integrity is compromised?
 

thomas

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Every thing seems covered, but I second that customer service is good. They are true to their lifetime warranty. When I took advantage of mine they also repolished the frame, added new decals, bolts, seat clamp etc. When it came back (very quick turnaround) we thought it was a new frame at first.

Bike still looks and feels like new. Forgot when I bought it...
Very encouraging! The left chainstay on my R340 developed a 10cm-long crack, but I haven't contacted customer service yet. No problems on my R230 which seems to be of a much more solid build. My Ti Panasonic had a cracked seat tube which proved to be irreparable. So yes, titanium is absolutely not bomb-proof.
 

luka

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The left chainstay on my R340 developed a 10cm-long crack
My Ti Panasonic had a cracked seat tube which proved to be irreparable
wow, is this from just regular use and wear n tear or were you in some crashes etc? I know it's not theoretically bomb proof but I would never expect such a large probability of structural failure. more like 1/1000 or something......
 

luka

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also, @Half-Fast Mike I'd like to ask you several questions if you don't mind. I saw your build thread here, and I'm curious:

- do you remember how much did you pay in import duties (is it 8% to cover the VAT or?)
- is that finish the so called industrial mill or?
- what are your impression briefly on the frame so far?

thx
 

luka

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Check out Tim at GS Astuto. He's got Ti!
thx, I was under the impression he does wheels mostly. the website also seems to suggest so... the only frame shown there is a carbon one. you think Tim might actually source and weld Titanium under given specs, or just act as a local dealer/importer for foreign frames?
 

TokyoLiving

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thx, I was under the impression he does wheels mostly. the website also seems to suggest so... the only frame shown there is a carbon one. you think Tim might actually source and weld Titanium under given specs, or just act as a local dealer/importer for foreign frames?
Talk to him. I know he’s doing a custom Ti for a buddy I ride with. Don’t know details though.
 
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leicaman

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This is only a guess but I would think he gets the frames welded up in China. There are quite a few reputable companies welding Ti in China. Waltly immediately springs to mind. They do a lot of work for lots of companies with Ti bikes. Buying direct is an option but obviously not quite as easy as going through a middleman here.
http://www.waltlytitanium.com/
 
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