Losing weight

Yair

Maximum Pace
Nov 10, 2009
122
13
48
Hachioji
#1
As I recently came to the conclusion that further reducing my body weight (183cm, 69Kg ~ 70Kg) will be somewhat challenging, I decided to try and shed some weight off my Trek 2.1 bike, instead...
I already:
Replaced my wheels with Bontrager Carbon Aero (lost 450gr)
Switched to a carbon handlebar and stem (lost 100gr)
Changed crankset to FSA Carbon (lost 200gr)
Upgraded my seatpost to Bontrager Race X lite (lost 60gr)

Any ideas on additional "diet" I can apply to my bike?
 

AlanW

Maximum Pace
Jan 30, 2007
1,214
435
103
Tokyo
#2
You've already hit the highlights; wheels make the biggest difference. I assume you changed the tyres too.....

Your fork has an aluminium steerer....a full carbon fork like an Oval R900 can save you another 150 grammes.

I've got a spare pair of Dura Ace 7800 brake calipers that you could replace your Tiagra with - pm me if interested.

AW.
 

massa

Warming-Up
Feb 22, 2008
174
0
0
Setagayaku
#3
I guess your idea of loosing wight came from your desire to get more speed. Wheels, tires, tubes, crankest, cassette sprocket, pedals, chain and rear dérailleur are parts composing your bike which you give directly momentum to them. Getting more speed concerns, changing those items will be the best solution. On the other hand, changing other component like frame, handle bar, saddle, seat post so on are rather hard to make difference. As AW pointed you've already done main dishes. So, more training to get well-muscled body will be your next option.
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#4
- Saddles can vary a lot in weight; depending on before and after models you can easily shed 100 grams, and considerably more if going from one extreme to another:

http://weightweenies.starbike.com/listings/components.php?type=saddles

- Groupset, of course, but as you've already done the crank the dollar/gram ratio is going to be pretty steep on that one.

- Depending on your current stuff, a cassette and chain switch might net 100 grams+ also.
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
#5
- Groupset, of course, but as you've already done the crank the dollar/gram ratio is going to be pretty steep on that one.
Shifters can be suprisingly heavy. I switched my Ultegra shifters to SRAM Red, saving about 150 or so grams. I got some TRP calipers weighing 250g for the pair (DA are 305 according to that article). As Phil says, saddles can be a good place as well. I switched out my old selle italia genuine gel (250g) for an SMP carbon saddle that's only 165g; I also shaved another 40g off with some titanium skewers.

The Easton EC90slx straight fork is lighter than the Oval R900 by about 100g.

There's diminishing returns after a while though.

Given that we're practically the same height, I could lose 7kg to get to your level. That'd probably be the cheaper option for me.

How much does your current bike weigh?
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#6
It's funny that this has come up as this was one of the main topics along the Tamagawa on Sunday's ride.

They basically proven that the most important place to shed weight is the wheels and any drop in weight there purely outweighs any lossage else where. Contact points are basically where you should focus on weight loss for increased performance:

Wheels
Tires
Pedals
Cranks

Everything else is purely cosmetic in returns..... One option for major weight loss though on the bars and stems is going for an intergrated stem and bar set.

Also Yair.... you might also want to kick that filthy habit.... and Im not talking about walking!
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#7
With a MBI of 19 and a bike that weights not even 7kg, my options are limited.

My weight reduction programme is focused on what I carry around:

- Avoid anything I will likely not need
- Avoid anything that can be bought
- Make sure anything I carry is really light

This means:

- No bottle or bottleholder in winter
- Small and light saddle bag with minimal equipment and light rain coat
- Very small lights
- Only 1-2 powerbars, often bought on the way
- No documents, cards etc that I will not need

The only thing I still need to work on is a lighter bike bag, at least for rides where I don't end up on express trains with little space and thus the need for my current bag.
 

Yair

Maximum Pace
Nov 10, 2009
122
13
48
Hachioji
#8
Wolfman,

Thanks for all the tip and valueable info.

Although I have never actually weighed my bike, it was originally around 9.2Kg (without pedals, according to the catalogue ), and with the recent weight loss (+ pedals), I would say around 8.6Kg.
 

Yair

Maximum Pace
Nov 10, 2009
122
13
48
Hachioji
#9
Phil,

Thanks for the saddle tip; I liked the chart, as well... When I purchased the bike I promised myself never to become a gram-person, but I guess it is just stronger than me...

I'll defenitely check-out the saddle :)
 

zenbiker

Maximum Pace
Mar 4, 2008
801
228
63
Chofu
#11
You are all missing a huge and profitable weight saving!
The average human kidney weighs about 650gm. You have two of these slowing you down!:confused:
You only NEED 1!! You should be able to get at least $10,000 for a nice healthy one. Think of all the carbon that would buy!:cool:
 

Yair

Maximum Pace
Nov 10, 2009
122
13
48
Hachioji
#12
You are all missing a huge and profitable weight saving!
The average human kidney weighs about 650gm. You have two of these slowing you down!:confused:
You only NEED 1!! You should be able to get at least $10,000 for a nice healthy one. Think of all the carbon that would buy!:cool:
Touché ! :D