Looking for some easy, fast hills.

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,750
1,673
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
Given this is Japan, that can't be much more than 20万円 per hour ;)
 

DeltaForce

Maximum Pace
Sep 17, 2011
204
25
48
Toki, Gifu
Even though I live only 5 km from the Tama hills, I haven't really explored all the possible routes. But I can say I really enjoy going down the Yomiyuriland hill, it's my usual route to the Tama river. I am always coming from the South side and it's an easy climb.

I think if you can't afford the helicopter, the best you can do is take a long time to gain height gradually, then drop off the side of the hill somewhere.

If you come off the river at Noborito, you'll gain the 100m in height over about 6km. They'll hardly realize they are going up hill. Only the last 300m is a little troublesome. The downhill has it all; A tight switchback turn, multiple drain covers recessed into the pavement forcing you to adjust your line at the last moment, even a slightly off camber corner. They'll even catch up to cars if there are any.

http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/79312549/

Dave
 

zenbiker

Maximum Pace
Mar 4, 2008
807
246
63
Chofu
But I can say I really enjoy going down the Yomiyuriland hill,The downhill has it all; A tight switchback turn, multiple drain covers recessed into the pavement forcing you to adjust your line at the last moment, even a slightly off camber corner.
Dave
And the skin from my knee, hip and elbow...:eek:
 

yukun

Speeding Up
Feb 18, 2011
55
0
26
Setagaya Ward, Sangenjaya
Even though I live only 5 km from the Tama hills, I haven't really explored all the possible routes. But I can say I really enjoy going down the Yomiyuriland hill, it's my usual route to the Tama river. I am always coming from the South side and it's an easy climb.

I think if you can't afford the helicopter, the best you can do is take a long time to gain height gradually, then drop off the side of the hill somewhere.

If you come off the river at Noborito, you'll gain the 100m in height over about 6km. They'll hardly realize they are going up hill. Only the last 300m is a little troublesome. The downhill has it all; A tight switchback turn, multiple drain covers recessed into the pavement forcing you to adjust your line at the last moment, even a slightly off camber corner. They'll even catch up to cars if there are any.

http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/79312549/

Dave
Sounds great, so long as one dosen't crash I guess. Will look it up then, Thanks!!
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,750
1,673
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
I used to live across the street from a helicopter mechanic. He told me one of the biggest costs of flying helicopters is the cost of turbine replacement / overhaul which you divide by the specified operating hours before the replacement / overhaul is required.

On a bike you can keep going until for example the bottom bracket or hub bearings start making funny noises. Worst case, you end up rinko bagging it home from the nearest train station or you walk.

On a heli or other aircraft the manufacturer tests to find out after many operating hours are part might reasonably fail, then you regularly replace or overhaul that part in a fraction (like 1/3 or 1/5) of that time even if it is still perfectly usable, just to make sure your kit never fails in a flight. So many hours of engine life, complete overhaul. That many hours, swap it for a new part, which costs a fortune. I could be wrong, but I think he mentioned something about a million dollars for a new engine on a typical light helicopter used for monitoring traffic or inspecting high voltage power lines (two of the most common uses in Japan).
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
2,707
938
133
Kanazawa
Joe--Isn't that a bit like crashing your CF frame/fork, and deciding if you're going to risk your health by continuing to ride it?

((Early 70s I was in the army, ATC, and while I never touched a wrench or any safety wire, the mechs and ourselves were both enlisted and so we socialized pretty much all the time. All my heli knowledge dates from then, tho they're still flying those airframes. They check the power lines here with Bell Jet Rangers (OH-58), which barely hold four people. Last year in Tateyama they were still using hueys to lift in construction materials.))
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,750
1,673
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
Joe--Isn't that a bit like crashing your CF frame/fork, and deciding if you're going to risk your health by continuing to ride it?
No, the aircraft practice is more like finding from testing that bicycles tyres wear out, for example around 3000 km and then requiring cyclists to put new tyres on their bikes every 1000 km.

With cars (or bikes) it's quite different. Of course there are safety critical systems like steering or brakes where you can't take any chances, but for many other kinds of problems having to use a tow truck (or bike bag) is not too much of an inconvenience. Cars are built such that something like 99% of customers do not experience engine failure in 100,000 km, but that last 1% is acceptable. It probably wouldn't be for aircraft.
 

Wolfman

Speeding Up
Jul 31, 2007
631
18
38
Suginamiku
Hope your friends aren't like me - I hate descending, scares the life out of me, and is only something to be endured after the climb.

I would never go riding just for the descent.

Oh my god, I just saw that this is my 666th post.
 

yukun

Speeding Up
Feb 18, 2011
55
0
26
Setagaya Ward, Sangenjaya
Hope your friends aren't like me - I hate descending, scares the life out of me, and is only something to be endured after the climb.

I would never go riding just for the descent.

Oh my god, I just saw that this is my 666th post.
nah, no worries there, went out to recon one today, hardly managed to hit 45kph (smallish hills) on my mtb though the strong winds did make for some "fun" crosswinds.
 

yukun

Speeding Up
Feb 18, 2011
55
0
26
Setagaya Ward, Sangenjaya
No, the aircraft practice is more like finding from testing that bicycles tyres wear out, for example around 3000 km and then requiring cyclists to put new tyres on their bikes every 1000 km.

With cars (or bikes) it's quite different. Of course there are safety critical systems like steering or brakes where you can't take any chances, but for many other kinds of problems having to use a tow truck (or bike bag) is not too much of an inconvenience. Cars are built such that something like 99% of customers do not experience engine failure in 100,000 km, but that last 1% is acceptable. It probably wouldn't be for aircraft.
true, considering most major aviation incidents start off from one small part (e.g. bolt) failing and cascading from there or from very minute manufacturing flaws (inconsistencies in metallurgy of alloys has caused turboprop engines from flaming out even within Japan). Woops, this is a cycling forum, not pprune:D