Help Loctite in the wrong places

rommelgc

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#1
About 3 months ago I got a set of good looking crank bolt dust caps.

Put Loctite blue on them and installed them. Yesterday I wanted to test a different crank arm, so I had to remove the crank arms that are currently installed. I've stripped (rounded the hex hole) both dust caps and they haven't budged an inch. I've drilled two holes on one of the dust caps, with the idea of using a pin tool. I still can't turn the dust cap.

I'm sacrificing these Campy dust caps, so what other options do I have.
 

kiwisimon

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#2
Heat will break the plastic loctite bond, soldering iron, heat the dust cap and then use pinholes to torque it out. Good luck. Oh a flame thrower type lighter will do the job as well. I am presuming the caps are alloy?
 
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GSAstuto

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#3
Non-heat version is MEK or Methylene Chloride which is a common ingredient in aircraft paint remover. Acetone is also somewhat effective if you soak the parts in it and the Locktite used was blue. Heat usually does the trick for me, then some acetone after it's cooled a little. If they are the plastic ones, yeah, heat will melt them, but then you can dig them out.
 

rommelgc

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#5
Something to try on the weekend. Thanks guys!

@kiwisimon I've got a lighter converter, stick in a butane lighter and get a nice hand held torch. Tokyu Hands. Hmmn the magnet test shows that the dust cap is steel. (Not sure if my magnet is too strong that its sticking to the crank bolt through the dust caps.)
 
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theBlob

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Sep 28, 2011
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#6
last choice, take em to a metal fabricator or machine shop (some motorcycle shops)and have them weld a bolt on.
 

GSAstuto

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#8
By the way - what crankset is this? Some Campy cranks had self extractors (like the SRAM), so the dustcap was actually the extractor support flange. If it's just a dustcap, then heating it up will almost always work, followed by some liquid wrench or if you've locktited it, acetone. However, since you've stripped out the hex - then you can use a Dremel to simply slot it then peel it out. Or drill 2 holes close to the edge and use a set of pin pliers to try and turn it.

@Mike - Kleenstrip makes some FAA approved prdts - but their 'original' Aircraft Remover is not now officially approved. I spent 2 summers stripping aircraft (helicopters mainly) to prep for rebuild, restore and resale. The ME / MEK strippers were the best, however not 'officially' certified for use on 7XXX alloys due the problem of accelerated surface corrosion. Since the FAA does not allow use of any ME prdts these days, but Klean Strip still makes them for non-aircraft use, yet the name followed the product, they can still sell it as long as they clearly designate that it's not for Aircraft use. (Rules change, but the product hasn't). And it's about $200/gal cheaper than the 'real' FAA certified product.

If you do use ME to strip alloys, then you need to wash and etch it almost immediately following the removal process. Usually this will be a dilute acid wash followed by a zinc-chromate washing etch.

I go into a little detail here because modern bikes are not so unlike aircraft in their component materials and construction. And most lbs / home mechanics simply have no clue about proper materials maintenance.

If you have some time - here's a decent guide on aircraft corrosion maintenance -- http://www.faa.gov/regulations_poli...craft/amt_handbook/media/FAA-8083-30_Ch06.pdf

I really miss being back in the heartland of aviation (Seattle) because all the good stuff was literally within 10-20min drive. So many aircraft surplus (including Boeing) and supply places to source all the 'right stuff'. Here in Tokyo it's extremely challenging to find anything comparable or useful for bike tech. For example, try to source West Systems some time. Or Boeshield. Or Tuurco. Or even aircraft graded hardware. Improvisation is the key here.

IMO, Kinoshita san is the master of improv here in Japan. He's a journeyman plumber by trade and a master restorer by hobby. Mainly of Campy parts. Check out his FB posts sometime - he points out quite alot of domestic products that are useful for bike restore and maintenance.
 

GSAstuto

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#10
All Campy dustcaps screw in or out 'conventionally'. Meaning 'right to tight' , 'left to loosen' . Cranks are a different story - the carbon ultra-torque connecting bolt is reverse threaded on the Super Record.
 

rommelgc

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#11
By the way - what crankset is this? Some Campy cranks had self extractors (like the SRAM), so the dustcap was actually the extractor support flange. If it's just a dustcap, then heating it up will almost always work, followed by some liquid wrench or if you've locktited it, acetone. However, since you've stripped out the hex - then you can use a Dremel to simply slot it then peel it out. Or drill 2 holes close to the edge and use a set of pin pliers to try and turn it.
The crankset is an '80s Super Record. I installed these dust caps as replacements. No self extractor thingamajig, it just a bolt inside.
I might just have to slice it down the middle using a dremel and use a big screw driver (or a watch case back opening tool). Need to find some acetone.


You are turning it the right way, aren't you? I've been caught out before by tricksy left-hand threads in the crank/pedal region. Just in case.
All Campy dustcaps screw in or out 'conventionally'. Meaning 'right to tight' , 'left to loosen' .
Yep turning the right way. Lefty loosey, all the way.
 

GSAstuto

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#12
Since we never used the dustcaps for exactly this reason, I used to have dozens of them piled in my toolbox. I threw them away. Might have some laying around somewhere. Yeah, Dremel them out is probably the fastest way. Also, we never rode with dustcaps cause those cranks have a habit of loosening sometimes at poor times - so you'd be able to get them tightened on the road (moto-mechanic) or double check before you start. Last note on this - some people would use grease on the axle thinking this would 'help' to get the crank arm on more snug and creak-free. But usually what happens is that the grease lubricates too much and you end up over torquing the crank arm and then it starts to crack. So, best is keeping it super clean and if you feel the necessity to prep the taper, then use something that is not akin to a heavy grease but more a lacquer or anti-seize like locktite zinc anti-seize (doh!). Tapers are meant to be assembled dry.
 
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rommelgc

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#13
I'll resume working on it this weekend.

Though I just found the little Loctite bottle behind a counter ... hiding it seems. Its the 243 medium strength type.
Reading the spec sheet now and it seems that I'll be needing a lot of patience to get the caps off.
Maybe next time I'll thread lock my headset lock ring instead. Keeps loosening up after every ride.