Liquids along Doshi Michi

snoogly

Maximum Pace
Oct 14, 2007
695
48
48
Machida, Tokyo
#1
I am planning to venture further along Doshi Michi than the route 76 junction that has been my limit thus far. But in this heat I worry about the availability of liquids en-route. Is there a reasonably plentiful supply of convenience stores and vending machines, or should I make sure my bottles and stomach are well stocked with liquids?
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#2
There is a free fresh water spring a few km up Doshimichi from the r76 branch-off, and there is a good conbini just before the Doshi michi no eki. There are also drinks machines every few km until the michi no eki. Nothing though between there and Yamabushi Toge.
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#4
This is the first summer when I take two 1l bottles on some rides into the deep mountains. But almost invariably I encounter the next chance to fill up my bottles before I have touched the second of the two. It is not difficult in Japan to find water - at least not if you are willing to seek out the taps of private houses in the country side or drink from mountain streams. In summer I avoid any liquids other than water, because they take far longer to be absorbed.
 

jdd

Maximum Pace
Hardest Crash
Jul 26, 2008
2,519
650
133
Kanazawa
#6
And another aspect of "liquids", does anyone ever jump in the water when out for a ride? (stream/lake/reservoir)

Shorts on or sans?
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,181
76
68
Kochi
#8
And another aspect of "liquids", does anyone ever jump in the water when out for a ride? (stream/lake/reservoir)
I was sorely tempted to paddle my tootsies today, but just settled for filling my cap with water at some of the `springs` and tipping it all over me. Went a bit too far one time and ended up with my socks squelching in my shoes so had to walk for a while on a section of hot tarmac to help them dry out a bit - DOH!!! :hammer:

This is the first summer when I take two 1l bottles on some rides into the deep mountains. But almost invariably I encounter the next chance to fill up my bottles before I have touched the second of the two. It is not difficult in Japan to find water - at least not if you are willing to seek out the taps of private houses in the country side or drink from mountain streams. In summer I avoid any liquids other than water, because they take far longer to be absorbed.
I always wonder about dong this, but knowing someone who once had a life-threatening illness due to a water-borne illness (drinking water that turned out to be unsafe) I`m unsure how safe it is. Obviously, the local villagers develop an immunity to any sort of infection but will it wreck havoc with my western stomach/system that hasn`t been exposed to such water since the day it was born???
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#9
I always wonder about dong this, but knowing someone who once had a life-threatening illness due to a water-borne illness (drinking water that turned out to be unsafe) I`m unsure how safe it is. Obviously, the local villagers develop an immunity to any sort of infection but will it wreck havoc with my western stomach/system that hasn`t been exposed to such water since the day it was born???
Is that someone in Japan?

I don't do this in other countries, for exactly this fear. And I don't take water from just any stream, anywhere. Many roads/rindos actually have designated springs. When I take directly from a stream, it needs to be a small one, ideally running over stones, no evidence of iron or other colouring, no roads or other civilization above the spring etc.

Anyhow, I'm doing this now for three years, and have never had a problem. Apparently the forest workers do the same.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,181
76
68
Kochi
#10
Is that someone in Japan?

Many roads/rindos actually have designated springs. When I take directly from a stream, it needs to be a small one, ideally running over stones, no evidence of iron or other colouring, no roads or other civilization above the spring etc.
No, they were in Thailand at the time and it was never possible to identify the precise cause - might have been just salad (from a restaurant) rinsed in water that wasn`t as clean as it should have been. Was an amoeba infection.

How do you tell a designated spring? On the mountains I climb, there are so many places where black hoses (plastic tubes) stick out of concrete walls, which implies to me they must be used as water sources for locals, but close inspection of these said hoses doesn`t fill with me with the confidence to drink the water therefrom. Maybe if I had a solar kettle...
 
#11
Once ate a salad on a Singapore Airlines flight...it tasted delicous and I devoured the entire plate. What happened afterwards, I will never forget :eek:

No, they were in Thailand at the time and it was never possible to identify the precise cause - might have been just salad (from a restaurant) rinsed in water that wasn`t as clean as it should have been. Was an amoeba infection.

How do you tell a designated spring? On the mountains I climb, there are so many places where black hoses (plastic tubes) stick out of concrete walls, which implies to me they must be used as water sources for locals, but close inspection of these said hoses doesn`t fill with me with the confidence to drink the water therefrom. Maybe if I had a solar kettle...
 

Ludwig

Speeding Up
Oct 9, 2008
871
0
36
Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
#12
How do you tell a designated spring? On the mountains I climb, there are so many places where black hoses (plastic tubes) stick out of concrete walls, which implies to me they must be used as water sources for locals, but close inspection of these said hoses doesn`t fill with me with the confidence to drink the water therefrom. Maybe if I had a solar kettle...
Always drink from them. Never a problem. And always tastes much better than water in Tokyo or water from a bottle.

There are also occasionally sources with proper taps etc. where people come and load up their cars with tons of bottles of water.
 

Pisces

Cruising
Dec 15, 2007
19
0
11
Zama City
#13
Anyone has a suggestion for a water bottle? i purchase polar bottle but water gets warm pretty quick almost same as regular bottle. I thought may be i should get a slim thermostant that same size as 750 ml polar bottle.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#14
HIGH5 Eurobottle's!!!

I know, I know, Im plugging a sponsor but just ask anyone that i've given these too. Once you use them you are smitten.

Bloody great ergonomic design, conform to all Japanese and Euro standards for non leaching materials. Dish washer proof, Great drinking spout and very easy to clean.

People attending the ePerformance camp will be getting them in the goodie bags.


In regards to keeping your water cool, sorry buddy but its impossible in the Japanese heat and really the only method I know of to date is the Camelbac hydration systems that are either carried on a wearable vest or in a back pack and those are the ones that use the thermo sleaving and pocket.

I've looked at military issue kit for the exact same purpose but there isn't anything out there.
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
1,454
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#15
Anyone has a suggestion for a water bottle? i purchase polar bottle but water gets warm pretty quick almost same as regular bottle. I thought may be i should get a slim thermostant that same size as 750 ml polar bottle.
The Polar bottle definitely keeps drinks colder for longer than a regular bottle. But as FarEast says, it's still not enough.

Here's what I do: half-fill Polar bottle with water and lay it down at an angle in the freezer several hours (or overnight) before riding. Top it up with coldest-possible water/sports drink just before setting out.

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The angle is to maximize the cooling surface area while avoiding ice build-up in the cap/spout.

Works for me, even on the hottest days. If I'm using two bottles I might completely freeze one and half-freeze the other. On group rides we often buy and share a bag of ice at convenience store stops.