Lightweight Tent for Cycling

Malte

Maximum Pace
Sep 26, 2011
496
54
48
Tokyo
#1
I am searching for lightweight tends that I can use for (1-2 night) touring. Maybe something like this. Do you have recommendations especially where to (online) shop?
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#2
I've seen one man tents that zip in to a sleeping bag - these are ultra small and ultra light:

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Couple of big stores down in Yokohama that stock stuff like this - Shika and MyX - you could also try Mont Bell and other big stores.
 

Gunjira

Maximum Pace
Oct 2, 2009
1,003
176
83
Tokyo
#3
A hammock will beat any tent hands down for weight and packing volume.
Warbonnet and Hennessy are my recommendations.
 

theDude

Maximum Pace
Oct 7, 2011
773
111
63
Tokyo
app.strava.com
#5
For motorcycles, I use lightweight backpacking tents.

the two i have experience with are:
MSR Hubba
Big Agnes Seedhouse SL 2

The Hubba is a single, not big, but decent vestibule. I don't think the vestibule is such a big deal on a bicycle, mostly cuz the bike won't fit in it, most gear should fit inside the tent. Hubba would be tight with some amount of gear inside. i really liked this tent, rain fly went wonky due to probably poor care by me.

To replace it, I got the Big Agnes. It's technically a 2 man, but a small 2 man. The key thing here is that the poles pack down to a very small size, so it isn't a "long" packed tent. Not a huge vestibule, enough space for gear inside. No space for a whole bike tho like the tent above.

both of these are pretty light tents.....
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#11
After spending alot of time bike touring and camping here's what I preferred:

1) MSR or NorthFace 'proper' dome tent. If you can carry it - it's worth the hassle and small weight. When you are away from your bike, your stuff has a 'home'. Surprsingly secure.

2) Hammock / Bivvy. Just awesome. Doubles as a sleep shelter anywhere - and of course in your tent if you're carrying that, too. Or as the required sleeping sack at hostels. I got my current bivvy sack at Victoria. I want Gunnar's Hammock!

3) Bear Pawd - these guys have the sweetest shelters out there! http://bearpawwd.com/ A shelter style cloth is very versatile - especially for camping in warmer climates.

4) Thermarest - man, this was the innovation of a century if you ask me. A thermarest makes all the difference between sleep and not. I really wish I had one on the last night of Haute Route - I froze to death with nothing but my bivvy sack and stolen table cloth. Therma-rest ... no issues!
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#12
Actually a hammock works quite well in the inclimate weather. Cause usually you are hanging it between or anchored in a tree! Then all you need for weather protection on top is a rain fly layer. Also - keeping your body off the ground a bit is a good thing when it starts getting really wet.

It doesn't keep you dry though if it rains.
 

Gunjira

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Oct 2, 2009
1,003
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83
Tokyo
#13
I thought the same, but they actually come with mosquito and rain cover.
I more wounder how difficult it is to find a good location/trees.

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I never took the tarp so far, but have slept a couple of times under the roof of an open hut. View attachment 1195
Your eyes get trained to judge the distance and find good spots and because the ridge line is variable you are quite flexible.
I'm using the war bonnet black bird, because it's the best fit for my size.
 

Forsbrook

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Feb 13, 2008
412
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48
Katsushika-ku
#14
GSAsututo,
"4) Thermarest - man, this was the innovation of a century if you ask me. A thermarest makes all the difference between sleep and not. I really wish I had one on the last night of Haute Route - I froze to death with nothing but my bivvy sack and stolen table cloth. Therma-rest ... no issues!"

I second you!
An essential part of any cycle tourist's kit!

I've been using an REI tent to much satisfaction.
 

theDude

Maximum Pace
Oct 7, 2011
773
111
63
Tokyo
app.strava.com
#15
GSAsututo,
"4) Thermarest - man, this was the innovation of a century if you ask me. A thermarest makes all the difference between sleep and not. I really wish I had one on the last night of Haute Route - I froze to death with nothing but my bivvy sack and stolen table cloth. Therma-rest ... no issues!"

I second you!
An essential part of any cycle tourist's kit!

I've been using an REI tent to much satisfaction.

+1 on thermarest. I've got a couple, one packs down much smaller than the other.

+1 on REI tents. I've never had one but used one once. Also, several friends with them have nothing bad to say. I don't think they are as light as the ultralight high-end tents, but certainly much more reasonably priced.