Leg vein issues - cycling?

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#1
Hey all,

I have a strange question to ask, where better to ask than the Internet...

In the last 6 months or so I have noticed a few tiny purple veins on my legs that did not seem to be there before I started cycling, and I seem to remember hearing that some riders do develop vericose veins or other issues of that sort. I looked up spyder veins on google and while there is a resemblance, the ones on my legs are literally just a few random ones, not a cluster of many.

I know that many stores stock compression clothing for recovery purposes, would these things help this issue? Or is this not related to cycling?

Sorry for all the detail, but hey I have to ask
 
May 22, 2007
3,571
1,390
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#2
I have a strange question to ask, where better to ask than the Internet...
No problem. We love this stuff. Just try a 'saddle rash' thread and watch 'em squirm.

In the last 6 months or so I have noticed a few tiny purple veins on my legs
Either
They will disappear on their own, in time; or
They will not get any worse; or
Your legs are going to fall off.​
Or possibly some completely different result.

What might be happening is that you are gaining leg muscle and losing fat, so your blood vessels are becoming more prominent in places. Or you may have plague rabies.

According to the Cyclist's Book of Home Remedies (Machin, 2012), you should scrape them off with a rusty nail while biting down on a titanium seat post to stifle the screams.

Alternatively, if you're concerned, go see a medical professional. Stu recommended the Tokyo Vein Clinic elsewhere [thread].

(James, in contrast, has a season ticket at the Tokyo Vain Clinic, where he is the visiting professor meretricious.)

As I suggested in the thread linked above, you can do this...

proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fimg69.imageshack.us%2Fimg69%2F331%2Flegsup.jpg&hash=d14ca807f6c8e5ed1d2a7e8ca9f3f9cf


...for 20 mins. It can seem a really long time. Get an iPod or something. Best just before you go to bed. Once a day. Really helps with lower leg circulation disorders and mukumi (can't remember the English word now).
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#4
Hey all,

I have a strange question to ask, where better to ask than the Internet...

In the last 6 months or so I have noticed a few tiny purple veins on my legs that did not seem to be there before I started cycling, and I seem to remember hearing that some riders do develop vericose veins or other issues of that sort. I looked up spyder veins on google and while there is a resemblance, the ones on my legs are literally just a few random ones, not a cluster of many.

I know that many stores stock compression clothing for recovery purposes, would these things help this issue? Or is this not related to cycling?

Sorry for all the detail, but hey I have to ask
Very common in cyclists,

What are varicose veins and spider veins?

Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red, or flesh-colored. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They can be swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are often found on the thighs, backs of the calves, or the inside of the leg. During pregnancy, varicose veins can form around the vagina and buttocks.

Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. They also are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. They can be found on the legs and face and can cover either a very small or very large area of skin.

What causes varicose veins and spider veins?

Varicose veins can be caused by weak or damaged valves in the veins. The heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients to the whole body through the arteries. Veins then carry the blood from the body back to the heart. As your leg muscles squeeze, they push blood back to the heart from your lower body against the flow of gravity. Veins have valves that act as one-way flaps to prevent blood from flowing backwards as it moves up your legs. If the valves become weak, blood can leak back into the veins and collect there. (This problem is called venous insufficiency.) When backed-up blood makes the veins bigger, they can become varicose.

Spider veins can be caused by the backup of blood. They can also be caused by hormone changes, exposure to the sun, and injuries.
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
48
68
Tokyo
#6
Very common in cyclists,

What are varicose veins and spider veins?

Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red, or flesh-colored. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They can be swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are often found on the thighs, backs of the calves, or the inside of the leg. During pregnancy, varicose veins can form around the vagina and buttocks.

Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. They also are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. They can be found on the legs and face and can cover either a very small or very large area of skin.

What causes varicose veins and spider veins?

Varicose veins can be caused by weak or damaged valves in the veins. The heart pumps blood filled with oxygen and nutrients to the whole body through the arteries. Veins then carry the blood from the body back to the heart. As your leg muscles squeeze, they push blood back to the heart from your lower body against the flow of gravity. Veins have valves that act as one-way flaps to prevent blood from flowing backwards as it moves up your legs. If the valves become weak, blood can leak back into the veins and collect there. (This problem is called venous insufficiency.) When backed-up blood makes the veins bigger, they can become varicose.

Spider veins can be caused by the backup of blood. They can also be caused by hormone changes, exposure to the sun, and injuries.
Thanks for the great detail
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
242
103
tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#18
Well, he could be calling me 'hoss' - that's more what I heard from friends down Dixie way. I have Aussie biz partners and they're all about the 'mate' thing - so that's cool, too. But for the longest time (being mainly a Cali guy) the shoutouts were : 'homes' , 'dude' , 'yo' , 'bro' , 'ese' ...
 

Deej

Maximum Pace
Oct 13, 2007
1,018
149
83
Setagaya
#19
I've had too many English friends for too long, perhaps! And, what about you using the term "chuffed"? :p
Hee hee! I'm just playing. :) Our speech patterns are definitely influenced by those around us. When I return to the States, I'm sometimes told that I talk "different," and Britishisms (and Aussie-isms) have for sure creeped into my regular vocabulary.

And surely you knew that I tossed in the words "chuffed," "blimey" and "Yank" for effect.

But, yeah, "dude," "bro," mate" -- it's all good! Not so sure about "hoss", though. ;)

And as for the vein issue -- Mr. Kelly's bizarro quads (duals?) strike me far more than his veins do in that photo.

Deej