Help Jobs in Tokyo area for an American bike mechanic?

ibikemo

Warming-Up
May 1, 2017
2
0
1
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#1
Hello everyone. My wife is currently considering a postdoc job in Tokyo. I'm a service manager at local bike shop in the U.S. with no Japanese language skills (I'm trying to learn now!), and I'm wondering how difficult it will be for me to find mechanic work in Japan, or if it's even possible at all. I'm not sure where to start looking. Does anyone have any experience with this or know of any shops I can reach out to where I might have a chance?

Thanks in advance.
 

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
385
141
73
46
#4
Do you have any qualifications? Having them makes a referral worth a lot more and I would imagine you are going to need a word of mouth door opening. I wouldn't say it's impossible but perhaps you could consider volunteering at stuff till your language skills get off the ground. (You are lucky in that you will be learning the Japanese as you will hear in Tokyo. Rosetta Stone seems to be the most recommended program. I wouldn't bother with trying to learn the reading and writing). Do you race? If you are on a team and can show your skills that would also be a bonus. Good luck and keep asking any questions you may have.
 
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theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
2,863
1,450
129
...
#5
It's going to be tough for you to find work in a bike shop with no language skills. In most shops the mechanics also serve customers and order parts etc. without being able to do that side of the work it might be tough. Still not impossible. Best of luck!
 
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andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
1,584
1,271
133
Niigata
#6
Lots of Japanese can fix bikes. But not many can speak English.

Play to your strengths.

My advice is to teach a few people English on the side... and ride you bike into the sunset....

edit: that's actually sunrise, but yeah, maximise your time here to explore the amazing cycling that Japan has to offer...

Andy

www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 
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Bruno BQ

Maximum Pace
Mar 9, 2015
149
26
58
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#7
I am also a Postdoc here in Tokyo (biochemistry), I also got here with very little JP, now is just not much JP hahahaha

Well I can't help you with a job (I never went to the mechanic here) but I can help you with places to learn JP and any other stuff your wife my need with the Postdoc. I will send you my email by message so feel free to get in touch.
 
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ibikemo

Warming-Up
May 1, 2017
2
0
1
35
#8
What visa do you have? If you are a dependent on your wife's visa, you need to ask for a work permit. Then you can work up to 28 hours a week.
I'll be dependent on my wife's visa.
If you only work 28 hours a week don't expect to be handsomely rewarded but do expect no benefits.
Sorry to be down,but this what Japan is like nowadays.
Thanks. I know it won't be easy at all, but this is what I need to know before we go.
Do you have any qualifications? Having them makes a referral worth a lot more and I would imagine you are going to need a word of mouth door opening. I wouldn't say it's impossible but perhaps you could consider volunteering at stuff till your language skills get off the ground. (You are lucky in that you will be learning the Japanese as you will hear in Tokyo. Rosetta Stone seems to be the most recommended program. I wouldn't bother with trying to learn the reading and writing). Do you race? If you are on a team and can show your skills that would also be a bonus. Good luck and keep asking any questions you may have.
I have 4 years of full time bike mechanic experience (1 and a half as service manager), and have developed professional relationships with reps at Specialized, Giant, and Cannondale. We're a full service bike shop, so I do everything from flat repairs to frame up Di2 builds. I ride a bunch, but no racing.

Thanks for all the replies. This has already been really helpful.
 

George5

Maximum Pace
Oct 16, 2014
385
141
73
46
#9
Advertise your services on craigslist, many folk are afraid their lack of J language skills make going to a Japanese shop a bit intimidating. Good advice about English teaching. When you get settled let us know where you are situated and things might look more definite. Tokyo is rather a large place.