Today January 2020!!!

luka

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Jan 13, 2015
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Once this happened to me after switching the stem.
yeah it's understandable if you change stem and/or spacers etc. I got that on my gravel bike recently when I put in a new cockpit. so I had to put a 7.5mm spacer where I only used 5mm before. but this bike came out of the shop this way, and I changed nothing at all. I guess I should have realized before last summer (a year into owning the bike) that headset was loose. it was probably almost imperceptible in the beginning, and gradually loosened up or something...

very interested to see how cannondale and the shop respond to this now. they told me it may take several days, and that is fine really. let's wait and see
 

luka

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that's my thinking exactly. I don't think there are any more rim brake hi mod frames being produced, new version or old. but they've been around up to 2017 or so, so stock should be available. otherwise not sure how we can come to an arrangement...
 

luka

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I don't normally watch this guy but am vaguely aware he can be "controversial" or "divisive" etc. so not really sure what brought me to this vid this morning, but gotta give due where due is... due?

 

pedalist

Maximum Pace
Today, I joined a local MTB group for a relaxed ride on local trails for the first time. Around 20 people showed up. A very friendly bunch of all kinds of people (various levels, ages, bikes etc.). While I was in the upper half ageswise, I definitly was at the way lower end by level. On flats or up the hill I was fine, but once we hit more tricky trails or DH sections I couldn't keep up. Good thing we always waited for everyone after those parts. Half way into the ride the group spilt into beginner and advanced level. The beginner level was challenging enough for me. But actually for inspiration I'd like to see what trails and how the others rode. Anyway, it was great to see how much control over their bikes some people have. Seeing those skills in real life (vs. YT videos) is very impressive, specially when following on the same trail.
Here are things I've learned today:
General safety (actually commonsense):
- in group rides only ride according to your own abilities (don't do what the big guys do)
- keep the practice for when you're only with a few others or alone
Next skills to practice:
- doing manuals, even just for a meter or two (base skill for jumping)
- jumping (not just dropping)
- drifting in corners
Next upgrade's on gear (luckily mostly quite simple and not so pricey investments):
- brakes (got them, just waiting for the disc wheel to arrive)
- wider handlebar (now 62cm, want around 70cm)
- different pedals/shoes (still don't really know what I want, clipless vs. flat vs. hybrid)
- dropper post
[- lighter and better fork (luxury)]
 

luka

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good for you @pedalist ! my location and other life commitments mean I cannot realistically ride MTB more than a few times a year max, even if I had one. so I won't be getting one anytime soon, but it is loads of fun. one can learn so much about handling and other skills you don't really get through road cycling alone, but which do translate into road eventually. the two disciplines are kinda complimentary. if I ever find myself in a situation where MTB riding could be more accessible, that is the only bigger investment I theoretically see myself making in cycling-related matters in the mid future
 

luka

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Jan 13, 2015
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some good info here, continuing on the theme of carbon steerer tubes, stem clamping forces, preventing headset play and supporting the steerer from the inside with a plug/expander. I actually have that same featherweight (and now not so reassuring after I've inspect it the other day for myself, and seeing this guys discards it like that) expander in my cannondale, but will be looking to replace it with something longer and sturdier, even if it means 20 grams or something more. just to see first what's gonna happen with the whole fork issue. a bit of plastic, rubber O ring and two small expandable aluminium rings in that setup leave me apprehensive, even if they somehow matched the bottom stem bolt clamping place perfectly, and that's a big if in itself. so a 45-50mm shaft is going in there soon methinks, along the lines of:

1578925424253.png

now for the actual video!

 
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joewein

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Oct 25, 2011
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Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
I had a nice ride in West Izu last Saturday (on Strava). At 163 km it was my second Century distance of the year. The elevation gain in Izu is always hefty, in this case over 2000 m of barometric count (significantly more according to Strava).

I'd been meaning to go back to West Izu since December, but first business travel and then other work got in the way. Finally I made it there again, thanks to our friend Ikuyo who is visiting from Australia, where she moved a year ago. So six of us met up at Mishima station, to ride down to Matsuzaki.

I arrived by car (via Tomei) and headed back that night while the others took the shinkansen and stayed at a ryokan in Matsuzaki to ride a bit further the next day.

This is the view from Heda, half way between Cape Ose on the northwest corner of Izu and Toi, one of the bigger towns on the coast. It was drizzling as I drove to Mishima, but it had mostly stopped by the time we started riding at 8:30 and cleared up during the morning. First the top of Mt Fuji was completely obscured by clouds, then we got a glimpse of the snow, then it was almost fully exposed.



We had lunch at a crab restaurant and four of us shared this monster size spider crab:



On the way to the coast we passed many villages where locals where preparing for ritual burnings of left-over shrine decorations from last year in big bonfires:



The pace was slower after lunch. As we got to Dogashima, only 5 km from Matsuzaki I decided to turn around and head back to Mishima to make the most of the daylight. I still ended up cycling about 7 hours in the dark.



Well, not quite because it was a full moon night so it was never pitch black. In fact I had Mt Fuji ahead of me for much of the time, with the snow covered slopes reflecting the moonlight. I think this was the first time I kept seeing Mt Fuji at night in Izu - usually the views end at sunset!

The Google Pixel 3 did quite well and even captured some stars:



I had a choice of heading east over the mountains from Toi towards Izunokuni or taking the same road as we'd come on, which I picked even though there's very little traffic there and large stretches without phone coverage, not so good for emergencies. But the elevation stays under 300 m, so no risk of ice. The whistling sounds of deer in forest accompanied me on my climbs and descents.

At a view point north of Heda I met a young cyclist on an adventure ride who was considering his course options. We talked for something like 20 minutes. He had only taken up cycling a year ago and was a local of West Izu. He was obviously not discouraged by the night and the cold on his entry level bike.

I got back to the car park near Mishima a little after midnight and (after some sleep in the car at a service area car park) got home before 03:00.
 
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bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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Miura, Japan
I have not really been on a bike in a while due to reasons....
Today messing around in front of the house on my Fisticuff, I rode a wheelie half way down he block.
I suck doing wheelies on my Ritchey Logic. I suppose it is the MTB influence on the almost a road bike...

Regardless, this bike is insanely fun to muck around on. I think it would be fine in a B pace road ride. A pace might be a stretch and A+ is out of my gearing ratio at 34x11 top gear.
 
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luka

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in case someone is interested, here's how my cannondale steerer saga played out. the shop I bought the bike from tells me that apparently cannondale says they couldn't see any deformations or cracks running parallel to the steerer, and nothing to indicate fibre and/or structural damage, so it's more or less natural wear and tear which they also see on their test bikes etc etc. the shop was kind enough to offer to pay for shipping of the fork to and from them, so they can inspect the thing, rather than just photos. but I don't wanna risk any damage during shipping, and am also aware this is still superficial and not structural damage, so close inspection by them would most probably result in similar diagnosis.

so I've taken it apart once more, was satisfied that the steerer can be trusted under proper setup, at least for another couple of thousand kms. I then proceeded to remove this ultra-light but flimsy cannondale explander plug-top cap:

1579324454443.png

and install a much sturdier and longer one:

1579324624507.png

also noticed those carbon spacers had really sharp edges to them, so filed them down a bit with 1000 sand paper. one was deemed too rough to be worthy of such an operation, and I just replaced it with an aluminium one (1g VS 3g!). had to also add another 2 or 2.5mm spacer to get the headset to properly close (another gram added).

so I'm now satisfied there is absolutely no play in there, no dirt, rust etc, everything is smooth and tight, and the steerer is also reasonably reinforced from the inside as well. in total, this adds 44g to the bike, but it's all well and good if I can jinx death (死死グラム). next weekend I'm gonna open my gravel bike and check how is that steerer doing (carbon one in a titanium frame), since that bike has seen much rougher riding. never had headset loose on that one, but want to check more than anything dirt/grime ingress, and how is the expander plug positioned relative to the stem, as my new stem is a whole cm larger at the clamping part than the first one around which the headset was initially setup.

putting winter miles into maintenance should pay off when the warmer and longer days come.
 

luka

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realizing I am away next weekend and won't be able to play bike maintenance, I opened the lynskey head parts today too. and it was a mess! in order of non-importance

1) expander plug O ring is broken. could perhaps bodge it with something similar, but effective support length is only 17mm on this one. so I'm getting another 50mm one for this bike too instead. who'd knew I now have a favorite steerer plug?

1579331713393.png

2) it was so grimy I couldn't believe it. it must be the copper paste, won't be using that again. grease never gets this messy. lower bearing is sticky, and I wanna replace it now. the upper one is perfect in comparison (to be fair, the bottom one will take much more grit and abuse anyway). if I can only find out what I need to buy. it only says cane creek 52mm (nothing on the angle of the contacting surface etc)

3) effing steerer again!! very subtle rings developing around bearings. apparently this is just gonna happen with carbon steerers? but more than that, it looks like it's developing a crack right in the middle! gonna contact lynskey about this and see what they have to say. no bueno

1579331906052.png
 

thooms

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Jul 6, 2019
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That's pretty disappointing about the crack, @luka. While have absolutely no idea what I'm talking about, that would definitely knock my confidence without getting an informed second opinion. You inspired (scared?) me to dismantle mine as well and have a look - fortunately for me I didn't find anything that looked suspicious.

My rear rim on my long-suffering 2007 Neutron Ultra wheelset is getting quite worn - down to around 1mm thickness in the middle. Not quite what they seem to consider dangerous, but I might finally start looking for a replacement. Bought them used with my student loan in 2008 while at university - they've been flawless the whole time.

I know it's dumb, but I've been wondering about trying some carbon wheels... Anyone got any advice? Seems like the braking (wet, in particular) on modern wheels has got a lot better in the last few years. My current wheels are ~1470g, shallow clinchers - if I have to replace them, I'd like to get something at least as good, ideally that feels like an upgrade (I don't like the idea of spending $600 on a replacement for them to feel worse than my current ones). Tubeless compatible would be a bonus. Considering the new Bora WTO 33...but that's a lot of money :S
 
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luka

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You inspired (scared?) me to dismantle mine as well and have a look - fortunately for me I didn't find anything that looked suspicious.
yeah I really think people should make it a habit of inspecting steerers regularly. I was kinda doing it about once a year during an overall, but am going to pay much more attention to this going forward. like 2-3 times a year, depending on mileage. better to discover crack in it today, than in my skull and/or teeth suddenly some day on a ride somewhere...

about carbon wheels, I guess you are after some rim braking ones? and want them to be shallow too, rather than deep "aero" ones?
 
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bloaker

Sincerely A Dick
Nov 14, 2011
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Miura, Japan
About to take the Fisticuff out this morning for a ride!
Not that this info is any different than normal for me to ride it, but today I am in a road kit for the first time in over a year... Not even sure where I am going, but the plan is simple... have fun and try to stick to pavement when possible.
 

thooms

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Jul 6, 2019
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yeah I really think people should make it a habit of inspecting steerers regularly. I was kinda doing it about once a year during an overall, but am going to pay much more attention to this going forward. like 2-3 times a year, depending on mileage. better to discover crack in it today, than in my skull and/or teeth suddenly some day on a ride somewhere...

about carbon wheels, I guess you are after some rim braking ones? and want them to be shallow too, rather than deep "aero" ones?
Indeed. A friend of mine suffered a steerer failure on an alloy fork a few months back. He was really beaten up - must’ve been a horrible experience. Worthwhile investment, will definitely make it a regular check.

That’s exactly it - after some shallow section, rim brake ones. Leaning towards Campag, but that’s only because I’m a knob and my existing Campag wheels have been amazing. Don’t trust myself building carbon rims, so will leave that to the experts. Noticed Bora One 35s are pretty (edit: that should probably read relatively) cheap at the moment (I guess because they’ve just been superseded) - they aren’t tubeless, but I don’t know how much that’s actually worth to me...

Have fun @bloaker - take some pictures :)
 
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