If you got new wheels what would they be?

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#1
Hi again all,

Here is a little about me, my goals with riding, budget, and what I'd like to see as far as characteristics in the wheel set.

I have been riding for just under 3 years, currently I do not ride in the winters so that is not exactly three years, but you get the idea. I ride an average of 3 times a week equalling 150+km, and this year I want to take that up a knotch - say 200+ per week. I am about 69-70kg as well.

Goals, I was told to take my time and build a base of fitness, that is, every year push the ride time higher and higher, but don't go nuts right out of the gate. So I plan to keep improving overall during the next few years and then I'd like to take part in some friendly competition, and also ride more often with different groups to help judge myself better.

Budget etc, $1,000 Canadian (about 75.6円)
Simply I'm looking for durability and performance, so for example I am looking for a wheelset that I can ride for 5+ years without having major repairs, and I'd like the wheel set to have a weight that won't punish me on climbs, but more importantly I want a very nice rolling wheelset.

Thanks in advance.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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www.roadfixie.com
#2
That's a no brainer -

Shimano DA 7900-CL24's , TL is also an option - it's slightly heavier and allows for use of Tubeless tires which may be more versatile over the course of several years.

Budget on these is about 86man - so slightly higher - but well worth it. Otherwise - save the money and get a set of 6700's you get nearly all the same goodness at about 40% less cost and only 250gr (1 water bottle) heavier.

Any wheel you ride at 200km+ week is going to require periodic maintenance and as for 'major repairs' not sure what you mean - but for sure you'd be looking at replacing freebody, bearings, etc. At least the Shimano are very 'rebuildable'. Sealed bearings used in most wheelsets will last only a year or so depending on environment or how much grittiness you can tolerate. Shimano still uses loose balls , so you can perfectly adjust and maintain. This has worked great in wheels for more than a century. If you keep them clean, dry and out of the harsh environment as much as possible, they'll last very very long.

On contrary - I've had customers bring in bikes / wheels that are really great brands - but because they don't protect them environmentally - they are corroded, rusted and basically shot out after only a couple years.

Other notables - Any wheelset built with DT , Chris King, White, Alchemy or Soul hubs are great. Some of the pure Asian brand hubs do pretty good, too. Like Novatec, HubSmith, YuHub, Chosen, Token. If it's a high quality, forged hub with anodizing, it will last. Bearings on all these are sealed, common , bearings. Easy to get and replace.

Rims - nice alloy rims are everywhere. Again, if you'r going for longevity and ease of service, then choose more conservative builds that use traditional spokes. Mavic, Ambrosio, H+ , Velocity, etc....

All good wheels (including Shimano) will use good spokes. Mainly by DT, Pillar, Sapim either directly or as OE. If you get wheels that use funky spoke systems , cool, maybe they will give you .001% better rigidity - but if you break a spoke or need some servicing - good luck! Not unsurprisingly, 'exotic' wheels rarely perform any better (or worse) than their conservative counterparts.
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#3
If I got new wheels...

that were durable all-rounders, I would almost definitely go with some kind of custom build. I'd probably want:

- Clinchers with aluminum brake track (better braking performance, better heat dissipation under braking)
- Shallower, lighter rims rather than deep section (perhaps a personal thing, but prefer to have less weight at the rim, and shallow sections handle a lot better in crosswinds, especially on descents)
- Decent spoke count for durability and the ability to continue riding after a spoke break
- Non-proprietary parts, particularly spokes (many factory wheels such as Mavic or Easton have proprietary spoke technology which requires you to send the wheel in for servicing, sometimes for months. A standard J-bend spoke can be replaced in the LBS in 5 minutes.)
- I'm also interested in the new wider rims that are all the rage now (23 mm)--I think HED started it but a lot of custom builders are offering them now as well. No idea if it's just a fad or there are real advantages, but I'd be interested in trying them out.

For your budget, you could get a very nice, durable but light set of custom wheels, easily under 1500 g. Here are some builder options:

http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com/
http://www.wheelbuilder.com/store/
http://www.bdopcycling.com/Wheels-Clinchers.asp#SPRINT
http://www.zencyclery.com/road-2/anna-purna-custom-wheelset.html
http://www.boydcycling.com/vitesse-alloy-clincher/

I'm thinking of getting a new wheelset myself this year and the Boyd Vitesse clinchers are currently at the top of my list.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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www.roadfixie.com
#4
We are seeing more interest (finally) in the slightly wider rims, as well. We've got a new lineup of CX (Cyclocross) series that uses mainly 23mm - 25mm alloy niobe rims (tubular and clincher) , Pillar Race spokes and ultra smooth forged hubs for under 3man. CX wheels tend to carry a few more spokes in more conservative builds due to the harshness of use. But they are also very suitable for larger , 'Clydesdale' riders - or just where you want extra load capacity or impact resistance.

The road 'Attack' series is based on same hub, but uses a 16DS /8NDS arrangement for a little less 'windup' flex. Also uses the PIllar 1422 (aerospokes) Niobe 30mm rim (19mm), and , again, very 'jam econo' pricing at around 3man.

If you want to try these - I have a few demo sets kicking around. Shimano (sorry, Phil) only freebody at the moment.
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#5
That's a no brainer -

Shimano DA 7900-CL24's , TL is also an option - it's slightly heavier and allows for use of Tubeless tires which may be more versatile over the course of several years.
I have read some great reviews about C24's and they all echo what you've said here, so these are definitely a top contender for me. My buddy has had a set of Dura Ace wheels since 07 and has had no major issues, and he basically just rides them and does his own truing.

With regards to 'major repairs' I consider a major repair to be anything that costs more than 80% of the original price.
 

AlanW

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Jan 30, 2007
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#6
Another vote for Dura-Ace

The Dura-Ace wheels are, well, Ace. Naomi-san and I have several thousand km on our DA wheels and they have never needed to be trued, the hubs roll super smoothly, never broken a spoke, it's easy to run tubeless tyres if you want, they come with top quality DA skewers and wheel bags, and have a 3 year warranty.
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
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Tokyo
#7
that were durable all-rounders, I would almost definitely go with some kind of custom build. I'd probably want:

- Clinchers with aluminum brake track (better braking performance, better heat dissipation under braking)
- Shallower, lighter rims rather than deep section (perhaps a personal thing, but prefer to have less weight at the rim, and shallow sections handle a lot better in crosswinds, especially on descents)
- Decent spoke count for durability and the ability to continue riding after a spoke break
- Non-proprietary parts, particularly spokes (many factory wheels such as Mavic or Easton have proprietary spoke technology which requires you to send the wheel in for servicing, sometimes for months. A standard J-bend spoke can be replaced in the LBS in 5 minutes.)
- I'm also interested in the new wider rims that are all the rage now (23 mm)--I think HED started it but a lot of custom builders are offering them now as well. No idea if it's just a fad or there are real advantages, but I'd be interested in trying them out.

For your budget, you could get a very nice, durable but light set of custom wheels, easily under 1500 g. Here are some builder options:

http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com/
http://www.wheelbuilder.com/store/
http://www.bdopcycling.com/Wheels-Clinchers.asp#SPRINT
http://www.zencyclery.com/road-2/anna-purna-custom-wheelset.html
http://www.boydcycling.com/vitesse-alloy-clincher/

I'm thinking of getting a new wheelset myself this year and the Boyd Vitesse clinchers are currently at the top of my list.
Some very interesting options here, and unfortunately I can't really comment because I've never heard or seen these before. I'll read up on the links provided. Thanks.

I do agree with what you said about the characteristics of a wheel set, I'm not too crazy about having to wait forever just to get some basic work done.
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#9
The Dura-Ace wheels are, well, Ace. Naomi-san and I have several thousand km on our DA wheels and they have never needed to be trued, the hubs roll super smoothly, never broken a spoke, it's easy to run tubeless tyres if you want, they come with top quality DA skewers and wheel bags, and have a 3 year warranty.
Yeah I have seen this with my own eyes, my buddy is not the most gentle guy with his Dura Ace wheels or the groupo, and he too has thousands of km's, rides them and puts them away wet (so to speak), and has never had an issue.
 

j-sworks

Maximum Pace
Feb 5, 2012
1,199
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Tokyo
#10
We are seeing more interest (finally) in the slightly wider rims, as well. We've got a new lineup of CX (Cyclocross) series that uses mainly 23mm - 25mm alloy niobe rims (tubular and clincher) , Pillar Race spokes and ultra smooth forged hubs for under 3man. CX wheels tend to carry a few more spokes in more conservative builds due to the harshness of use. But they are also very suitable for larger , 'Clydesdale' riders - or just where you want extra load capacity or impact resistance.

The road 'Attack' series is based on same hub, but uses a 16DS /8NDS arrangement for a little less 'windup' flex. Also uses the PIllar 1422 (aerospokes) Niobe 30mm rim (19mm), and , again, very 'jam econo' pricing at around 3man.

If you want to try these - I have a few demo sets kicking around. Shimano (sorry, Phil) only freebody at the moment.
Thanks Tim, I'll keep that in mind - do you have a spec sheet or web site so I can geek out a bit?
 

FarEast

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May 25, 2009
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#13
Yeah I have seen this with my own eyes, my buddy is not the most gentle guy with his Dura Ace wheels or the groupo, and he too has thousands of km's, rides them and puts them away wet (so to speak), and has never had an issue.
I raced almmost 1000km in the Tour of Cameroon on my Dura Ace 24's can't praise them enough. I took them to be serviced and the mechanic said apart from being a little dirty there is absolutely nothing wrong with them.

Some of the roads made the Pari Roubaix look like a velodrome.
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#15
I raced almmost 1000km in the Tour of Cameroon on my Dura Ace 24's can't praise them enough. I took them to be serviced and the mechanic said apart from being a little dirty there is absolutely nothing wrong with them.

Some of the roads made the Pari Roubaix look like a velodrome.
Thanks for the race feedback, I think I am pretty much set on the C24's (the Zipp wheels and the other Dura ace models are hot, but out of my price range)

Cheers,
Josh
 

j-sworks

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Feb 5, 2012
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#16
Map sports

chainreaction had a golden week special on the 7900 C24 wheels--it could come up again.
Thanks for the info about CRC, I found a pair of lightly used C24's on the site called Map sports for 59,830円. I'm considering to enquire into the history of these.