Hi members!

tedK

Warming-Up
Apr 4, 2013
2
0
1
63
#1
Hi members!

This is "tedK". I just become a member. Thank you for the help by Thomas!

I would like to introduce myself. I was born in Niigata, Japan. I studied and worked in the US from 1976 to 1992 before moving back to Japan. Bon Jovi and I have lots of common , (studied in New Jersey), (the same birth date, different year though), totally different looks. You can ask me lot about New Jersey as well as Tokyo, Kanagawa, Chiba, other area in Japan and of course Niigata, and Hawaii.

Now, I am very new to the cycling and I would like to ask you how I can become a professional like "you all". I am 5' 11" and 195lb. The second item is what has made me to decide to go for the Cycling while enjoying a life. Where to find the bicycle, what type of the bicycle for the beginner, where to ride the bicycle, I have lots of questions.

Please help!! And thank you for the help!
 
May 22, 2007
3,617
1,454
143
Kawasaki
halffastcycling.com
#3
... I would like to ask you how I can become a professional like "you all".
Learn to love pain. See Rule 20.

The second item is what has made me to decide to go for the Cycling while enjoying a life.
'Enjoying life' is probably incompatible with 'becoming a professional', unless you do what I said for question 1.

Where to find the bicycle
Bike shop. Or the TCC New Classifieds (eventually). What's your budget?

what type of the bicycle for the beginner
The best one you can afford that you like the look of. Seriously. Get a good bike and it will last you for 20 or 30 years, or at least until you get the urge to upgrade. Unless you crash badly.

where to ride the bicycle
Why not start out with Half Fast Cycling? We lead rides every weekend throughout the year when the weather allows. Mostly harmless and very tolerant of beginners.
 

tedK

Warming-Up
Apr 4, 2013
2
0
1
63
#4
Learn to love pain. See Rule 20.

'Enjoying life' is probably incompatible with 'becoming a professional', unless you do what I said for question 1.

Bike shop. Or the TCC New Classifieds (eventually). What's your budget?

The best one you can afford that you like the look of. Seriously. Get a good bike and it will last you for 20 or 30 years, or at least until you get the urge to upgrade. Unless you crash badly.

Why not start out with Half Fast Cycling? We lead rides every weekend throughout the year when the weather allows. Mostly harmless and very tolerant of beginners.

Hello Half Fast Mike!

Thank you for the information and your advise. 'Enjoying life' is my main concept. I will start looking for a bicycle. I saw "Half Fast Cycling" and liked the concept "Exercise and Beer". I would like to join "Half Fast Cycling". One concern that I have is that I go to business trips a lot. I will miss some rides. I would also like to join the club rmeeting. Unfortunately, I am not in Tokyo area on the many of the second Wendnesday of each month. Am I qualify to join the club?

Anyway, thank you again!!!

tedK
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#5
Now, I am very new to the cycling and I would like to ask you how I can become a professional like "you all".
Stick to the day job, cycling doesn't pay all that well :D actually most find that they have less money after they take up the sport.

Welcome to the forums btw!
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
914
294
83
Tokyo
#7
The best one you can afford that you like the look of. Seriously. Get a good bike and it will last you for 20 or 30 years, or at least until you get the urge to upgrade.
I'm sure the advice is well-meant, but is it good? I'd recommend something well made and built to last, but unglamorous and modest. Two years later you may want to sidegrade. Anyway, you'll then have a much better idea of what kind of bike you want to ride for the next 20 or 30 years than you do now.

And as for wonderful bikes, don't underestimate the risk of theft. . . .
 
Likes: joewein
Sep 2, 2009
5
0
0
#8
I'm sure the advice is well-meant, but is it good? I'd recommend something well made and built to last, but unglamorous and modest. Two years later you may want to sidegrade. Anyway, you'll then have a much better idea of what kind of bike you want to ride for the next 20 or 30 years than you do now.

And as for wonderful bikes, don't underestimate the risk of theft. . . .
Nice try, Dad.
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
5,528
538
193
Yokohama
#9
Two years later you may want to sidegrade.
Two years???? Try 2 minutes after you get it home and start looking at all the shiney stuff you can buy.

But my advice is this:

Get properly measured up for the bike 1st, spend the money so that you don't end up wasting your money on a frame 2 sizes too small - Treat it like buying an expensive pair of hand made Italian shoes, get properly measure up and then try on for size before committing. Many of the big brands allow the shops to change out stem, bar sizes so don't fall in to the trap of them telling you that you have to purchase these additionally.

Buy something slightly above your budget that puts a huge friggin smile on your face and makes you feel like a kid again.
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
914
294
83
Tokyo
#10
Uh, nice try yourself, but that should have been "Nice try, Gramps"! :cool:

Today I'll commute on the bike I bought last year for 36 thou (takkyuubin included), when it was about 30 years old. I'd like to say "It always brings a smile to my face"; but this isn't quite true now that I realize the outer chainwheel seems to be slightly bent. (I haven't yet investigated the inner one, let alone started to follow
HTML:
<a href="http://sheldonbrown.com/straighten-chw.html">Sheldon Brown's recipe</a>
for diagnosis and repair. No doubt metallurgy and engineering have advanced in the last three decades so newer bikes are less likely to suffer from whatever afflicts my transmission. But swings and roundabouts: today's brifters need (I'm told) more frequent attention than anything does on this bike. A thirty-year-newer descendant of my bike that fits tedK as well as this bike fits me should bring a smile to his face. But the bike's for "Criterium" -- that's what a sticker on the frame says, and who am I to argue with Miyata? -- and the ride may be exhilarating but I wouldn't want to go very far on it.

Really, I think some experience with a good bike helps to tell you which bike would be excellent bike for you.

[PS sorry about the messy attempt at a link above. This new interface is very swish, but....]
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
914
294
83
Tokyo
#15
I was talking about the old man;)

Pretty straight looking ride< original paint?
You want to see the engine? Now that really does look ratty. You wouldn't want to see that, believe me.

As for the bike, yes, original paintwork, I think. "LeMans" seems to have been Miyata's name for one (low?) price range of just about any sporty bike in those long-ago (pre-"mountain") days. So for example here http://kamagayabase.blog.fc2.com/blog-category-13.html is a "LeMans" touring frame that says "LeMans", that was made by Miyata, that was presumably made of steel, but that seems otherwise unrelated to my frame.