Hello World

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
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Kawaguchi
#1
hello Tokyo.

ren here. I'll be moving to Tokyo to study this July until 2014 :) I've been mountainbiking since 2010 and I've just recently had myself made a custom Maldea steel road frame. :)

I was just wondering how much work it would take me to bring my bike from home(Philippines) to Tokyo, or would purchasing one over there be much more economic?

I've also been starting to read about track bikes and fixies. Is it possible to get one around 50,000 yen over there? I don't need a carbon frame, just something aluminum or cro-mo. something I can commute with on a daily basis. :D

I'll hope to ride with you guys soon! :D
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,656
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Japan
#2
Welcome to TCC, I would think bringing your bike would be much cheaper than buying one here but check with your Air line what their policy is for bringing bikes is. As for a cheap fixie, no problem getting something for under 50,000円.
I remembre reading about Ave Maldea bikes here, lots of good things said about his work. http://forums.roadbikereview.com/2675550-post38.html
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
63
Kawaguchi
#3
Welcome to TCC, I would think bringing your bike would be much cheaper than buying one here but check with your Air line what their policy is for bringing bikes is. As for a cheap fixie, no problem getting something for under 50,000円.
I remembre reading about Ave Maldea bikes here, lots of good things said about his work. http://forums.roadbikereview.com/2675550-post38.html
yep. Maldea the one and only. proudly Philippine made. :)

Airline transportation wouldnt be too much problem since I just have to pay a fee to register it as sports equipment. I'm more concerned about the bus ride to Tokyo with my bag and equipments hauled along.

How about the registration process?

50,000 budget for a fixie commuter. All i'd ask for would be flip flop hubs for versatility and maybe bullhorns. Don't the gianty defy bikes go around the same price range? would that be a reasonable estimate?
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,656
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Japan
#4
I'm more concerned about the bus ride to Tokyo with my bag and equipments hauled along.

How about the registration process?

50,000 budget for a fixie commuter. All i'd ask for would be flip flop hubs for versatility and maybe bullhorns.
Ship with a courier company such as " Yamato kuroneko" in the box direct to your door, cheaper than buying a big bag.
Registration do a search on here.
Flip flop on a Tokyo commuter? Not worth it in my opinion. I would just buy a beater bike and you could easily pick up second hand bullhorn bars.
found this very quicly on auctions so yes your budget looks good. http://page14.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/s249050270
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
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Kawaguchi
#5
Thanks for the really quick reply. I appreciate it.

I really want to get it shipped just because nothing rides like the Maldea. I still have a lot of time until July, so I can still decide between an entry level giant or throwing a leg over a fixie. By the way. why do you say it's not worth having a flip-flop?

I'm really excited on my big move :D
 

kiwisimon

Maximum Pace
Dec 14, 2006
2,656
475
103
Japan
#6
By the way. why do you say it's not worth having a flip-flop?
For commuting, by the time you changed over gears you would have been able to ride up any hills. Tokyo metro isn't flat but any reasonably fit cyclist can get around fine with just one gear. In the mountains I would presume you'll be riding the Maldea.
 

joewein

Maximum Pace
Oct 25, 2011
2,429
874
133
Setagaya, Tokyo
joewein.net
#7
Welcome to Japan, tigerkamen!

I'm more concerned about the bus ride to Tokyo with my bag and equipments hauled along.
I usually take the train (Keisei line) because it's far cheaper than the Airport Limousine Bus rides. The bus is 3000 yen, you can travel by train for around 1400.

User Malte had his foreign-purchased bike shipped from the airport on arrival for 3150 yen:
https://tokyocycle.com/bbs/showpost.php?p=39583&postcount=20

How about the registration process?
There is no penalty for not registering a bike. If you want to do it, you can take the bike to a local bicycle shop and have it done for 500 yen.

50,000 budget for a fixie commuter. All i'd ask for would be flip flop hubs for versatility and maybe bullhorns. Don't the gianty defy bikes go around the same price range? would that be a reasonable estimate?
The Defy 3 (Shimano 2300) is listed for just under 80,000 on the giant.co.jp website
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
63
Kawaguchi
#8
Tokyo metro isn't flat but any reasonably fit cyclist can get around fine with just one gear. In the mountains I would presume you'll be riding the Maldea.
I'm sure I can push up hills if I can't ride em', but it's the going down and stopping(safely)on a fixie is what I am worried about.

BTW: I ride a single speed mtb that's why I'm not really worried about climbing I regularly do Cat2 and Cat 3 climbs here at home on my mtb too. :)


Thank you for the advise too joewein. I will read into that.

The giant tcr2 seems reasonably priced at just below 100000 yen the tiagra 10 speed upgrade seems like it's worth the 20,000 yen. the Fixer R also seems like a reasonable budgeted bike.
 
Dec 17, 2011
267
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kanazawa
#11
Don't the gianty defy bikes go around the same price range? would that be a reasonable estimate?
Noob reporting in. The cheapest defy is the defy 3, for a street price of around 80.000yen (I bought it just a few weeks ago myself, and had a 10% store coupon). It ends up feeling kind of pricier than expected, be prepared! Also, I know almost nothing about fixies, but giant had a cheap (around 50.000ish yen) fixie on their catalog. Have a look at it, it might suit you.

Just out of curiosity, are you coming in Japan with some sort of scholarship?

Cheers and have fun in Japan!
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
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Kawaguchi
#12
Noob reporting in. The cheapest defy is the defy 3, for a street price of around 80.000yen (I bought it just a few weeks ago myself, and had a 10% store coupon). It ends up feeling kind of pricier than expected, be prepared! Also, I know almost nothing about fixies, but giant had a cheap (around 50.000ish yen) fixie on their catalog. Have a look at it, it might suit you.

Just out of curiosity, are you coming in Japan with some sort of scholarship?
I've been saving up for it. and I was given some money by my company to pursue further education but with a performance bond: ie: I'd have to work for them for at least a couple of years after coming back home. So it's both a yes and a no.

I'll probably just go for the fixie, and ship my bike over. :D
 

trad

Maximum Pace
Dec 4, 2006
393
30
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Tokyo
#13
if you do bring your bike on the plane and if you'll be staying at or close to a major hotel... i recommend the limosine bus. I've travelled to Japan 3-4 times a year with my bike (before airlines started charging heavy fees for bikes) and limosine buses do a great job with bikes.... Very easy to get out of customs and have the bus guys take/load your bike and take off the bus. I would NOT recommend taking the Keisei Liner or any other train. Hauling a big box around tokyo trains & stations is a major nightmare.
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
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Kawaguchi
#15
I finally have a first day of classes. October 8! :D

see you soon Tokyo! I'll be flying over near the end of September. time to HTFU!

Stoked to get lost on the countryside!

speaking of which. Would you guys recommend just getting a regular cellular phone plan or get an iphone with unlimited data? (The 6k yen per month seems pretty expensive though.)
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
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Kawaguchi
#16
now for a ride. help me decide.

As I've previously stated, I ride on my custom steel bike everyhere back home.

I'm not a climber, a bit on the clydesdale side,but nothing too extreme.

Help me choose. I've set my eyes on Giant. 2 models to be exact. The TCR and the DEFY.

the main concern i have for the 2 bikes will be the availability of 9 speed parts and 10 speed parts. I know for sure that the standard is 10s so parts should be easier to scout for. How about the 9s parts? A bonus of the TCR is the compact road geometry. The pros just ride a carbon version on the tour.

Next. would you guys know recommend any nice ride around that same price range? Trek's bikes are of a much lower spec at the same price point.
 

kpykc

Speeding Up
Jun 13, 2007
804
4
38
38
Tokyo
#17
According to Giant -
TCR is for training and racing
Defy is for riding

So, decide what you want to do more.
You should be ok for 9s parts - I think they are still supported by Shimano, so everything should be orderable from bike shops. 10s is more common and easily upgradable - stick with that.
 

WhiteGiant

Maximum Pace
Nov 4, 2006
1,192
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Kita-Ueno
#18
Giant

According to Giant -
TCR is for training and racing
Defy is for riding

So, decide what you want to do more.
You should be ok for 9s parts - I think they are still supported by Shimano, so everything should be orderable from bike shops. 10s is more common and easily upgradable - stick with that.
The one drawback to the "Defy" is the weight. They will be as comfortable on the flats as any other bike, but as soon as you start going uphill, you will notice the difference.
If you can afford to spend a little bit more, get the TCR!
 

tigerkamen

Maximum Pace
Jan 6, 2012
264
108
63
Kawaguchi
#19
Weight isn't an issue for me. really. I ride a steel bike at home.

I'm probably gonna go for the TCR though. 10 speed seems like a smarter choice.

Thanks for the help.

Any other brands you guys think are better specced? :)