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Hello from Suginami-ku

Oldham-man

Warming-Up
Jun 28, 2022
5
5
Been lurking a while but thought I should intro myself before I start spamming questions.

Long term Tokyo resident. Relatively new to cycling as a hobby. But already managed a spectacular accident when a BMW pulled across me on a green light.

Managed 400k+ per month May-Dec 2022 with a 100k ride each month. And over 700k in Dec..
Just managed 100k in the cold. (Can’t say I’m a fan but determined to keep momentum thru the winter.).

Now to the questions. Ha ha.

This year I’m intending to try bikepacking. Target is a Campsite up around Fuji 5 lakes.
Currently thinking to go all in on Restrap bags but open to suggestions and any advice.

Also keen for any recommendations for cycling routes from Suginami. (60-120k range)
I’m an awkward distance from the Tamagawa.
My two exercise routes are.
Up to Tachikawa and laps of the showa park.
Up to Tamako on the cycling road and laps of the reservoir.

Thanks in advance.
 

Cactaur

Maximum Pace
Feb 3, 2014
328
261
If you're just getting into it I wouldn't spend a lot on Restrap stuff. Slightly salty about the frame bag which scratched up my frame. The straps now have been redesigned but eh.

I have a Topeak frontloader and midloader, price is much better and quality decent. Blackburn outpost for the rear cos Topeak's doesn't have a separate drybag.
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
1,442
999
If you're living in Suginami-ku, you're probably close to a station.

On a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, ride to the station. Put your bike into a rinkōbukuro. Carry it onto a train and disembark some way to the west or north. Do your 60 to 120 km ride. Put your bike back into the rinkōbukuro, carry it onto the train back.
 

Half-Fast Mike

Lanterne Rouge-et-vert
May 22, 2007
4,598
3,620
Also keen for any recommendations for cycling routes from Suginami
Depends where in Suginami. Are you at all close to Arakawa? It's probably urban hell getting there, but once there it's a gateway to nice long rides - either flat or out to the west Saitama mountains.

One mostly peaceful way to get to upstream Tamagawa/Ome area is alongside the Tamagawa Jōsui aqueduct. I rode along that to Mitaka the other day.

 

DanBell

Maximum Pace
Apr 26, 2010
269
73
If you're dipping your toe into bikepacking or bike touring I'd recommend going with cheap kit to start. You may discover that you prefer a different set up to what you start out with. Cheaper items allow you to experiment without taking such a beating if you need to rehome some of the gear later if you find it doesn't suit you.

In my experience Topeak and RockBros are widely available, inexpensive, and decent enough quality for your first couple of trips. If you like the setup you can keep using them until they wear out or upgrade as needed (wanted) and sell or give away the cheap gear you start with.
 

Oldham-man

Warming-Up
Jun 28, 2022
5
5
If you're just getting into it I wouldn't spend a lot on Restrap stuff. Slightly salty about the frame bag which scratched up my frame. The straps now have been redesigned but eh.

I have a Topeak frontloader and midloader, price is much better and quality decent. Blackburn outpost for the rear cos Topeak's doesn't have a separate drybag.
thanks for that. I had alook a topeak. I think I can save money there and still get something with a seperate dry-bag for the rear. I found a comment on wiggle about frame rubbing and planned to buy the frame protector to compensate.
 

Oldham-man

Warming-Up
Jun 28, 2022
5
5
If you're living in Suginami-ku, you're probably close to a station.

On a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, ride to the station. Put your bike into a rinkōbukuro. Carry it onto a train and disembark some way to the west or north. Do your 60 to 120 km ride. Put your bike back into the rinkōbukuro, carry it onto the train back.
Sorry. I should have mentioned I do have one such bag. I just lack the confidence to get on a train so far. So I'm going to make that a challenge for this year. At least take the train in the early morning and then maybe have a route from Ome or similar. Cheers..
 

Oldham-man

Warming-Up
Jun 28, 2022
5
5
If you're dipping your toe into bikepacking or bike touring I'd recommend going with cheap kit to start. You may discover that you prefer a different set up to what you start out with. Cheaper items allow you to experiment without taking such a beating if you need to rehome some of the gear later if you find it doesn't suit you.

In my experience Topeak and RockBros are widely available, inexpensive, and decent enough quality for your first couple of trips. If you like the setup you can keep using them until they wear out or upgrade as needed (wanted) and sell or give away the cheap gear you start with.
cheers! cheaper kit seems like a smart move. wish I could find a shop stocking some so I could have a feel as it were...
 

BeerTengoku

Maximum Pace
Mar 14, 2021
201
303
Sorry. I should have mentioned I do have one such bag. I just lack the confidence to get on a train so far. So I'm going to make that a challenge for this year. At least take the train in the early morning and then maybe have a route from Ome or similar. Cheers..
Best thing to do is practice at home a few times to gain confidence and see what you need to get.
Perhaps a sprocket cover just in case? Do you need to adjust the shoulder strap to carry the bike? All these little things that you can practice so when you get to the station, the only thing you have to worry about is which end to ride.
 

Oldham-man

Warming-Up
Jun 28, 2022
5
5
t'd be reet weird to call 'erself that if she were frum 'uddersfield.

thread linked below might give OP some encouragement. Rinkō is easy.

https://tokyocycle.com/threads/bike-bag-rinkō-bukuro-輪行袋-top-tips.8075/
Let’s just say I’ll have a Holland’s pie or six each time I’m back in England.

Awesome thread. I just watched the rinko bag master video. I think that needs to be a residential course. But I will challenge myself to Rinko bag this year.
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
3,296
3,550
Let’s just say I’ll have a Holland’s pie or six each time I’m back in England.

Awesome thread. I just watched the rinko bag master video. I think that needs to be a residential course. But I will challenge myself to Rinko bag this year.

If you like your cheese and onion Hollands pies and you need a quick fix, these are great from Gyomu Supermarket. You can also get a variety of chips and canned baked beans!


Andy
 

DanBell

Maximum Pace
Apr 26, 2010
269
73
If you like your cheese and onion Hollands pies and you need a quick fix, these are great from Gyomu Supermarket. You can also get a variety of chips and canned baked beans!


Andy
Those things are way better than they have any right to be.
 

microcord

Maximum Pace
Aug 28, 2012
1,442
999
I just watched the rinko bag master video. I think that needs to be a residential course. But I will challenge myself to Rinko bag this year.
If you hope to take your bike on the shinkansen (or certain other trains), you should reduce its dimensions by removing its rear wheel. This brings about certain complications, notably much greater vulnerability for your rear derailer, which therefore needs protection, which means metal bits to carry around and fiddle with (or to forget).

If OTOH you just want to take the train out to, or back from, somewhere like Musashi Itsuka-ichi or even Ōtsuki, all the bike needs is a token reduction in dimensions, and a cover. So you can leave the rear wheel on. The whole process is now so simple that even a klutz like me has no trouble doing it (other perhaps than outdoors in a strong wind).

Just be careful that you buy the right cover. For the latter purpose, people tend to praise the simple, foolproof Mont-Bell; but when I last investigated (perhaps three years ago), (i) this came in two sizes; (ii) Mont-Bell also had a both-wheels-off model (possibly in two sizes).
 
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