Heart Rate (Am I about to die?)

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
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#1
So my new garmin edge 800 has the nifty Heart monitor that you all know about.
I got to reading about zones and maximum heart rates on the net today. The max they said was 214 - (80% of age) (for men)

That would mean theoretically my maximum heart rate is 180.4

This morning I was getting all excited on my trip to the office and ran a kilometer or so at around 38km/hr. When I got to the office i saw that my heart rate went up to about 179 BPM. (trip average of 165BPM)

I have seen some others here with max heart rates over 200. (I think)

What kind of max heart rates are you guys getting to and where do you aim to sit on your training runs? Obviously the "guided max" is just that a basic guide with a lot of variables. But do you guys have a point that you cool off?

Thanks for any insight!
 
Jan 14, 2007
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Noda
japanichiban.com
#2
220 minus age used to be another rule of thumb.
I'm 48 and can get up to about 194. (does that mean I have a 26 year old heart?).

60-80% of your own real max is what you should be doing to maximize weight loss on long slow rides.
When I was racing I could handle 178 average for a short race.
I like to train at about 110- 124. Or hard training up to 160ish... and only go over 180 if I'm sprinting...
 

theBlob

Bokeh master
Sep 28, 2011
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#3
I guess fitter you get the lower your heart rate will be for any given speed. But by these guides it would seem that fitness isn't such a factor in determining max rates or the percentage ranges?
 
Jan 14, 2007
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japanichiban.com
#4
I guess fitter you get the lower your heart rate will be for any given speed. But by these guides it would seem that fitness isn't such a factor in determining max rates or the percentage ranges?
Your Max is your Max... like your ability to sing or jump or swim... I find it harder to get to my max as I get fitter...plus my max has probably dropped over the last few years...
 

Phil

Maximum Pace
#6
A couple of years ago I could just about get into the low 180s in a time trial event. Possibly I might have hit higher in a mass-start race (never wore the monitor for those), but probably not by much. In training I could never get it out of the 170s. On the other hand, I did manage to get the resting rate down to the low 40s once or twice. (At the time, probably mid-80 kgs range)
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
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#8
I'm 53 and my current max is 180 - but I ride most efficiently at 163 - 169. More than that and I hit my '8 minute max' before LAT totally wacks me. Below that and I'm probably in a grind mode or econo. When I do a long hillclimb I'll generally shoot a little lower so I have enough reserves to both make mini-attacks when required and also go over the top with enough juice left to descend without killing myself. It also takes me at least a good 30-40min of brisk riding to get my HR up and stable. I can't just hammer from zero and pull decent power or sustained max HR.
 

StuInTokyo

Maximum Pace
Dec 3, 2010
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#9
Well I'm 47 and fat :D

On climbs I have hit 181bpm my max should be 173 using the 220 - 47 = 173. When I ride I'm constantly hitting my max and going above it, I have to learn to go slower and not push so hard I guess, that is one reason I wanted a good HRM.
Now I just have to get out and use the darn thing :eek:
 

andywood

Maximum Pace
Apr 8, 2008
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#10
Heart rate varies between people, between rides you do, the time of year and your condition.

It's always interesting to compare your values to other people's, but this actually tells you very little...



I did a road race on Sunday. Flattish course. High speed. I was just uploading my HR data.



Polar stats for race including warm up:



  • 95 km
  • 400 m climbing
  • 93 / 123 av / max cadence
  • 44 / 68 av / max kmph
  • 159 / 184 av / max HR

My friend Oono san did 173 / 191 HR av / max in the same race. He's of similar age, similar ability and rode a similar race to me. So the difference in actual values don't tell you much.

What's more interesting is to compare heart rate zones or when either of you goes into the red (anaerobic).

Knowing figures like your resting, lactate and max HR, are important for this. These figures help you to estimate your heart rate zones and can also help you build a good training plan.

Moreover, using your HRM regularly can help you understand how your own body works. For me personally, I can ride an hour or so (ie. hill climbs) at 180 HR plus. For longer road races, I’ll aim at around 160. For something like the 300 km Tokyo ~ Itoigawa, 150 HR.

Knowing figures like this, although not rocket science, is the key to good training I think.

Andy



www.jyonnobitime.com/time
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
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Kochi
#11
If you want to know your max HR, my favourite story was to do a ramp session (i.e. keep increasing the intensity at a regular rate) and keep going until you pass out. The level your HR monitor records as you pass out is your max HR. So basically, don`t worry as you will pass out before you kill yourself. Your HR tends to be less when cycling, due to the different demands of cycling e.g. non weight bearing as compared to other sports. Running will record a higher HR, and (I`m guessing here) cross-country skiing would see the highest.

If you are going to train by HR, just read up on both its plusses and minuses, so you know what it can and can`t do for you.

here is a link for levels:
http://www.biketrainingtips.com/2011/08/rst-training-zones-based-on-heart-rate.html
 

FarEast

Maximum Pace
May 25, 2009
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Yokohama
#12
If you want to know your max HR, my favourite story was to do a ramp session (i.e. keep increasing the intensity at a regular rate) and keep going until you pass out. The level your HR monitor records as you pass out is your max HR. So basically, don`t worry as you will pass out before you kill yourself. Your HR tends to be less when cycling, due to the different demands of cycling e.g. non weight bearing as compared to other sports. Running will record a higher HR, and (I`m guessing here) cross-country skiing would see the highest.

If you are going to train by HR, just read up on both its plusses and minuses, so you know what it can and can`t do for you.

here is a link for levels:
http://www.biketrainingtips.com/2011/08/rst-training-zones-based-on-heart-rate.html
+1

Failure testing.... .been there, done that and it is "Evil" Anyone that is racing MUST do this, it will totally change your world and your perceived levels or exertion and what your body is capable of!

Please note that you must see a qualified physician and get the medical clearance before doing this as it can result in death. It should also be carried out with the assistance of qualified coaches in controlled conditions and environments as there is a high chance of injury or even death.
 

GSAstuto

Maximum Pace
Oct 11, 2009
945
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tokyo
www.roadfixie.com
#13
I posted before about the Tokyo Metro Gym program. Agree with FE - if you are planning to train and ride at your max effort, then its recommended to have a stress test at least once a year to determine not only your various levels, but also to spot any potential issues that may result from strenuous activities. And, oh, you won't 'pass out'. I've done a stress test at least 30x over the years and watched hundreds of others get theirs - no one passed out. A few puked, though. However, as FE said, this is NOT a lightweight test and if you have ANY pre-existing medical conditions (known or unknown) you could be putting yourself into danger of heart attack or other cardiac events. You are connected to an EKG and Gas Analyzer through the whole process and for a really good one, your blood is sampled at intervals as well. Any sign of abnormalities and the test is suspended.
 

Sikochi

Maximum Pace
Sep 13, 2010
1,147
45
68
Kochi
#14
+1

Failure testing.... .been there, done that and it is "Evil" Anyone that is racing MUST do this, it will totally change your world and your perceived levels or exertion and what your body is capable of!

Please note that you must see a qualified physician and get the medical clearance before doing this as it can result in death. It should also be carried out with the assistance of qualified coaches in controlled conditions and environments as there is a high chance of injury or even death.
+1 to what FarEast says to be on the safe side, but actually, this test was recommended by a doctor! Yes, max efforts are `evil` - did my VO2 sets on Monday - help! Sometimes you do wonder if the stress you place your body under is actually having more of a negative, than positive effect.